Project Title

Transport, Energy and Environmental Benefits of Intermodal Freight Strategies 

Project Year

2010   

Project Number

TPT 01 2010A 

Project Session

Session 1   

Project Type

Standard 

Project Status

Completed Project   
View Budget TableView Budget Table
|
PrintPrint

Project No.

TPT 01 2010A 

Project Title

Transport, Energy and Environmental Benefits of Intermodal Freight Strategies 

Project Status

Completed Project 

Publication (if any)

 

Fund Account

APEC Support Fund 

Sub-fund

ASF: Energy Efficiency 

Project Year

2010 

Project Session

Session 1 

APEC Funding

74,776 

Co-funding Amount

75,000 

Total Project Value

149,776 

Sponsoring Forum

Transportation Working Group (TPTWG) 

Topics

Transportation 

Committee

SOM Steering Committee on Economic and Technical Cooperation (SCE) 

Other Fora Involved

Not Applicable / Other 

Other Non-APEC Stakeholders Involved

Not Applicable

Proposing Economy(ies)

United States 

Co-Sponsoring Economies

Australia; Canada; China; Philippines 

Expected Start Date

25/03/2010 

Expected Completion Date

31/12/2011 

Project Proponent Name 1

Mr. Jeff Skeer 

Job Title 1

Chair, EWG Task Force - Biofuels, Energy Working Group 

Organization 1

Office of Policy and International Affairs, United States Department of Energy 

Postal Address 1

U.S. Department of Energy (PI-32), 1000 Independence Ave S.W. Washington DC 20585, United States 

Telephone 1

+1-202-586-3662 

Fax 1

+1-202-586-0013 

Email 1

jeff.skeer@hq.doe.gov 

Project Proponent Name 2

Mr. Walt Kulyk, P.E 

Job Title 2

Chair, Intermodal and Intelligent Transport Systems Experts Group, Transportation Working Group 

Organization 2

Director, Office of Mobility Innovation, U.S. Department of Transportation 

Postal Address 2

Federal Transit Administration, 1200 New Jersey Avenue S.E. East Building, Room E43-302 Washington DC 20590, United States 

Telephone 2

+1-202-366-4995 

Fax 2

+1-202-366-3765 

Email 2

walter.kulyk@dot.gov 

Declaration

Not Applicable 

Project Summary

This joint project will assess the energy, transport and environmental benefits of intermodal freight strategies that can help APEC economies to shift freight transport from energy-intensive transport modes like trucks to energy-economising modes like rail, barge and ship.  The project will also consider the opportunities for the use of alternative fuels in shifting freight transport from energy intensive transport modes to rail, barge and shipping modes. The project will have comparative case studies of benefits from developed and developing economies, with particular findings on capacity building in intermodal transport for developing economies which are planning major infrastructure expansion.  Benefits of intermodal freight transport would be evaluated in terms of reduced oil imports, reduced greenhouse gas emissions, and reduced transit times for freight shipments in the APEC economies that have adopted them.  The project will be conducted in four phases.

Phase 1 (first four months): Development of an analytical approach to assess the energy and environmental benefits of intermodal freight strategies in both developed and developing economies

Phase 2 (next six months): Analysis and preparation of a draft report of energy and environmental benefits of intermodal freight strategies based on the approach developed in phase 1. Phase 2 will include comparative case studies of benefits from developed and developing economies, with particular findings on capacity building in intermodal transport for developing economies

Phase 3 (next four months): Further work towards a final report, building on the draft report from phase 2 with further in-depth analysis and comments from the Expert Group on Energy Efficiency and Conservation and the TPT-WG Intermodal and ITS Experts Group

Phase 4 (final four months); Produce a final report and hold a workshop as part of a TPT-WG meeting on project findings, with particular attention to capacity building for developing economies.

Relevance

This is a joint project by the APEC Transportation and Energy Working Groups, which will assess the energy, transport and environmental benefits of intermodal freight modes like trucks to energy efficient modes such as rail, barge and ship, with particular findings for capacity building in intermodal transport in developing economies. The project proposal is in response to relevant directives from APEC Leaders and Ministers as well as Ministers for Energy and Transportation.  This is the first project in either Working Group to address the issue, building upon a survey of efficient transport policies which identified intermodal freight as a major option. This joint project will not duplicate any other completed or ongoing TPT-WG project(s) but will take into consideration relevant elements (intermodal and other aspects) of EWG and TPT-WG projects (finalised and current)”. Current TPT-WG projects see para 3 answer to Question 8 below.

At the Sixteenth APEC Economic Leaders Meeting (AELM) in November 2008 in Lima, Peru, Leaders urged officials to pursue regional energy efficiencies and maximize the potential development of clean energy technology. At the Twentieth Annual Ministerial Meeting (AMM), which also took place in 2008 in Lima, Peru, APEC Ministers encouraged APEC economies to consider participation and continue to seek greater energy efficiencies which promote energy security, economic competitiveness and minimize environmental impacts. APEC Ministers encouraged greater cooperation between the Energy Working Group and Transportation Working Group in assessing approaches to fuel-efficient transport. 

At the Seventh Energy Ministerial Meeting (EMM-7) in 2005 in Gyeongju, Korea, energy ministers agreed that an effective response to growing oil import dependency for the region as a whole requires a mix of demand- and supply-side measures, including increased energy efficiency in transport.  At the Eighth Energy Ministerial Meeting (EMM-8) in 2007 in Darwin, Australia, energy ministers reaffirmed the importance of fuel-efficient transport, stating that they “encourage APEC economies to manage their growing dependence on oil for transportation through policies and measures to promote energy efficiency in transportation.”  Transport is highly dependent on oil and by far the greatest user of oil in APEC economies, so more fuel-efficient transport is essential to curbing oil dependency.  Intermodal freight strategies for shifting freight shipments to less energy-intensive transport modes are effective for boosting transport energy efficiency.

APEC Transportation Ministers at their Sixth Ministerial Meeting in Manila, the Philippines in April, 2009 instructed the APEC Transportation Working Group to take an active role in collaborating with the APEC Energy Working Group in providing and adopting energy efficient processes and technologies and the APEC Agricultural Technical Cooperation Working Group to promote the development of next generation biofuels as directed by the APEC Leaders in November 2008 in Lima, Peru. Ministers also instructed the Working Group to identify opportunities for the development and promotion of fuel efficient transport policies and practices, including the use of alternative fuels for transportation vehicles and aircraft and to identify barriers to implement such policies and practices and determining appropriate actions to be taken.

Objectives

The objective of the project is to assess the energy, transport and environmental benefits of intermodal freight strategies to assist APEC economies in shifting from energy-intensive transport modes like trucks to energy-economising modes like rail, barges and ships.

The project includes comparative case studies of benefits from developed and developing economies with particular findings on relevant capacity building for developing economies.  The project should be of particular relevance to developing economies since their infrastructure is less fully developed and thus more subject to direction by policymakers.  Some of the policy questions that the project results will help to address include the following: What is the appropriate mix of investment in infrastructure expansion, as between highways for trucks and other road vehicles, railroads for freight and passenger traffic, and port facilities for ships and barges?  If the energy savings from moving to rail and water modes of transport are substantial, should a greater share of investments be devoted to these?  How can expanded infrastructure be designed so as to facilitate the easy transfer of freight between trucks, rail cars, and boats?  To what extent can long-run energy costs and environmental impacts be minimized by planning for such seamless transport infrastructure?  Developing APEC economies are well-positioned to expand their transport infrastructure in a way that is environmentally and economically sustainable and contributes to energy security. These questions will be more timely and relevant in the context of the recent stimulus measures by developing economies to maintain growth and employment following the recent global financial crisis. In addition, inputs will be sought from industry and business through the APEC Business Advisory Council (ABAC) involvement in the implementation of the project.

Benefits of intermodal freight strategies would be evaluated in terms of reduced oil imports, reduced greenhouse gas emissions, and reduced transit times for freight shipments in the APEC economies that have adopted them.  Through a better understanding of these benefits, the expansion of intermodal freight strategies should be encouraged throughout the APEC region, especially in developing economies where infrastructure is expanding rapidly.  Since transport is highly dependent on oil and by far the greatest user of oil in APEC economies, this expansion of intermodal freight strategies should ultimately help to curb the region’s oil dependency.


To follow up on the project and help ensure that its recommendations are implemented, several steps will be taken.  First, the project findings will be presented to the Energy Working Group, Transportation Working Group and ABAC for dissemination to appropriate ministries and key industry bodies in APEC economies.  Second, the findings will be conveyed to upcoming meetings of energy and transport ministers, particularly a combined meeting of energy and transport ministers that is envisioned for 2011.  Third, through an outreach workshop, a network of transportation experts and city planners from a wide range of APEC economies will be formed to publicize and implement the findings in major metropolitan areas. The central premise of this strategy is that improved understanding of the energy and environmental benefits will encourage wider application of the strategies identified.

Alignment

Not Applicable

TILF/ASF Justification

Not Applicable

Beneficiaries and Outputs

This project  would  benefit energy consumers, and stakeholders in logistics supply chain trade in all APEC economies.  It  would also provide considerable assistance to transportation planners in developing economies where policy choices about rapidly expanding infrastructure can encourage the greater use of energy-saving modes like rail and barge for freight shipments that bring goods to consumers  By building understanding of how intermodal freight strategies can reduce the time and fuel required for freight shipments from one place to another, the project should encourage the wider application of such strategies, as well as investment in rail and port facilities to facilitate the transfer of freight from trucks to other modes.  Through an outreach seminar, the project should build capacity in developed and developing APEC economies to put such strategies in place. 

For oil exporting economies, greater use of intermodal freight strategies to limit internal oil consumption should make additional oil available for export, with positive impacts on balance of trade and economic growth.  For oil importing economies, it can curb rising oil import dependency and ease pressure on world oil markets, boosting energy security and improving trade balances.  In all APEC economies, intermodal freight strategies can reduce shipment times and costs for freight companies, ultimately lowering delivered costs of goods to consumers.

By fostering more fuel-efficient road transport and transportation systems, intermodal freight strategies are also likely to have significant benefits for the urban and global environments. The wider application of intermodal freight strategies will translate into reduced combustion of oil and reduced emissions of carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxide that contribute to urban smog, with consequent health benefits for growing urban populations in the APEC region.  The health benefits in terms of reduced incidence of diseases like cancer and emphysema should be especially pronounced in developing economies that have not yet invested fully in pollution controls to limit such atmospheric emissions.  Globally, the application of energy-saving intermodal freight strategies will mean lower emissions of carbon dioxide, which will help to limit concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Transport is estimated to contribute to about 20 percent of the global greenhouse gases.

------------------------

The first main project output will be a report on the extent to which intermodal freight strategies can reduce freight transit times and costs, curb oil consumption and imports, and limit urban air pollutants and greenhouse gas emissions in APEC economies that adopt such strategies.  The emphasis will be on simple, workable, practical, cost-effective ways to shift freight from trucks – which are very oil-intensive and leave a large carbon footprint – to railroads, ships and barges.  For each such intermodal freight strategy that has been tried (or is planned), the report will document the percentage of freight that has been (or is expected to be) shifted to these less oil-intensive, less carbon-intensive modes of freight transport, and associated benefits in terms of reduced oil use, pollution (smog, sulphur dioxide, nitrogen oxide), and carbon dioxide emissions.

The second main project output will be a capacity building outreach workshop, with both government and industry participation from APEC economies. Active participants from the EWG and TPT-WG will be especially sought.  The workshop will be organized back-to-back with a meeting of the TPT-WG so that a broad range of APEC economies is represented by officials and experts who have a wide range of active contacts in the transportation field in their home economies.  In this way, it is expected that the key findings of the study will first be disseminated to a core group of experts, and then disseminated by that core group to larger groups at home.

Members of the Intermodal and ITS Experts Group under the TPT-WG will be especially encouraged to attend and participate since this Experts Group houses key professionals and officials involved in Intermodal freight activities in their respective APEC economies. Plans are to attract approximately 20-30 participants for the workshop.  Most will be able to participate on a self-funded basis, without APEC support.  But five expert professionals involved in freight management and logistics, as well five transportation officials from APEC economies, will be invited to the event, with their airfare and per diem to be reimbursed through project funding.  Through a mix of experts professionals, key economy officials, and members of the TPT-WG (including members of the Intermodal and ITS Experts Group) the workshop will generate good feedback to project report results and make follow-up recommendations to improve overall APEC Intermodal freight strategies in accordance with objectives of the project.

The primary purpose of the capacity building outreach workshop will be to disseminate the findings of the report and build capacity of officials and businesses to implement fuel-efficient freight strategies in a wide variety of developed and developing APEC economies.  Some of the key questions to be raised in the workshop that will build upon findings of the report include the following:  What approaches were found to be practical?  Which ones are too risky or costly or difficult or time-consuming to be worth undertaking?  What are the potential energy savings that can be expected?  Once these key findings are conveyed to the core group of experts, they can be more widely advertised and incorporated in transport, energy and economic development policies and programs throughout the APEC region.

In addition, the capacity building outreach workshop will be used to obtain feedback from participants about what fuel-efficient freight strategies are really being put in place, and which strategies are really practical and cost-effective, in order to improve the project report.  During the workshop, principals associated with the project development and outputs will review key findings from the report, highlight key facets of successful intermodal freight strategies for developing economies, and assess the potential energy and environmental benefits in developing economies in light of anticipated infrastructure investment.  Workshop participants will then have an opportunity to react to the findings and offer further perspectives on what would appear to be practical and beneficial in their own economies.  The final report will be improved substantially as a result of this “reality check” from developed and developing APEC economy participants.  The capacity building outreach workshop will seek participation of experts and officials from as wide a range of developing APEC economies as possible, in order to promote the widespread application of project findings and accelerate the adoption of energy-saving freight strategies.

-----------------------------

APEC member governments will participate in planning, implementation and evaluation of this project through the Intermodal and ITS Experts Group (IIEG) of the APEC Transportation Working Group; and the Expert Group on Energy Efficiency and Conservation (EGEEC) of the APEC Energy Working Group. The private sector will be involved through the APEC Business Advisory Council (ABAC).  The Project Overseers will ensure close collaboration with key ABAC members on various stages of implementation. The IIEG, EGEEC and ABAC have both men and women members. Civil society, which influences choices about energy and transport in APEC economies, will be a key focus of information developed by the project on effective intermodal freight strategies for the APEC region.

The project will also be undertaken in consultation with the APEC Agricultural Technical Cooperation Working Group as directed by Transportation Ministers in Manila, March 2009.

In addition, the project will also collaborate with officials involved with the TPT-WG’s current intermodal transport-related projects, including: Using More Inland Rivers in Intermodal Transport; Study of International Visitor Flows and Greenhouse Gas Emissions; Study of Secure and Smart Container Development for Intermodal Transport; and Study on Innovative Technology in Passenger and Intermodal Supply Chain Transportation Systems.

The project will be undertaken in close consultation with the American Public Transportation Association, responsible for the research and standards development relating to a large model shift in transportation in the United States in coming decades from private automobile to mass transit. This is to maintain the standard of living in the economy and reduce carbon emissions in the face of macro economic trends, including rising population and car ownership costs.

Dissemination

a.      the nature of the target audience;

The target audience includes policy makers in energy and transportation ministries, as well as local transport planning authorities, environmental NGOs and researchers, civil society and the general public who can benefit from more efficient fuel use in transport.

b.      the form and content;

A Report on energy and environmental benefits of intermodal freight strategies for developing and developed APEC economies will be made available in electronic form on the websites of the APEC Secretariat, Energy Working Group and Transportation Working Group, on other websites suggested by the Expert Group on Energy Efficiency and Conservation and the Intermodal and ITS Experts Group, as well as in hard copy and on CD, as required.  The report will comply with all APEC publication guidelines, logo formats, and copyright provisions.

c.      format (e.g. hard copies, floppy discs, internet uploading);

The primary mode of transmission will be internet uploading to the APEC Publications Database website. Energy Working Group and Transportation Working Group websites and other interested websites will also be utilized.

Additional transmission through hard copies and CDs will be made to interested parties by members of the Energy and Transportation Working Groups.

d.      number of copies for the publication;

         Five hard copies and electronic copies will be made available to the APEC Secretariat.  Additional hard copies and CDs will be provided to participants on an as-needed basis.

e.      a publicity plan for:

i)    briefing the general or specialist media about key components of the project;

Press releases will be prepared on key findings from the study.  Members of the Intermodal and ITS Experts Group and the Expert Group on Energy Efficiency and Conservation will be encouraged to brief the general press as well as publications that specialize in energy and transport, on the findings, and to translate the press releases into their respective languages.

 
ii)     the promotion of sales or other dissemination of the final product; and

The Report will be made available through the websites of the APEC Secretariat, Energy Working Group and Transportation Working Group. The Working Group members, as well as EGEEC and IIEG members, will be asked to distribute copies and publicise the key findings within their economies in their respective languages. An outreach workshop with both government and industry participation will be organized to disseminate the project results.

Gender

The project will actively seek to involve men and women equally in the planning, development and implementation of the project. Women will definitely participate in the project’s management and approval of the analytic approach taken, since the Lead Shepherds of the Energy Working Group and Transportation Working Group are women, and since women are members of the Intermodal and ITS Experts Group and the Expert Group on Energy Efficiency and Conservation that will help to guide and implement the project.

Many freight shipment companies are small and medium enterprises (SMEs) of which women make up a significant proportion.  Research shows that women-owned enterprises tend to face different issues than male-owned enterprises related to factors such as their business size (usually small and micro), the sectors in which they cluster (services), gender based discrimination and the disproportionate burden of family responsibilities.  These differences will be considered in evaluating effective strategies for fuel-efficient freight transport that will be attractive to women and can benefit both men and women in a wide range of APEC economies.

Research shows that there are considerable differences in how women and men access information, and that men and women tend to use different communication channels.  This will be addressed in the project by including a gender-sensitive strategy for awareness raising and publicity regarding potential strategies for enhancing the use of energy-efficient transport modes such as rail and shipping.  The project overseer will also urge individual economies to include relevant women’s networks when raising awareness of such strategies in their own economies.

-----------------------------

Intermodal freight strategies should benefit both men and women in APEC economies by reducing pollutant emissions that harm air quality, by reducing the costs of household goods (through pass-through of lower costs for  shipping components of goods to manufacturers and finished goods to retail centers), and hence by increasing the portions of family budgets available for health and educational needs.  Inclusion of women in project implementation can also help support the changes needed to implement and benefit from intermodal freight strategies in APEC economies. Implementation of new intermodal freight strategies will require qualified freight companies and personnel, thereby giving women more business and job opportunities as owners or employees of such companies. Women from policy making governmental bodies and industry will participate in the outreach workshop on the results of the project, thereby helping address their capacity-building needs.

A key aim of the project is to examine strategies for reducing the energy needs and costs of freight shipment companies.  Since women make up a significant proportion of the small and micro enterprises that are involved in shipments of freight within and across APEC economies,  the project will have direct benefits for these women. The project will examine the social, gender and economic impacts of strategies to promote fuel-efficient freight transport which can inform the development of future transport and tourism policies.  Insofar as the project contributes to understanding and development of oil displacement and climate change mitigation strategies, it should benefit men and women in developing and developed APEC economies alike.

Work Plan

(a)     Development of Analytical Approach: During the first four months of the project, the consultants will develop an analytical approach to assessing the energy and environmental benefits of intermodal freight strategies in both developed and developing economies.  The approach should detail equations and data sources to be used in calculating the potential for intermodal freight strategies to reduce shipment times and costs, curb oil use and imports, and limit emissions of urban pollutants and greenhouse gases.   The approach will include comparative case studies of benefits from developed and developing economies, with particular findings on capacity building in intermodal transport for developing economies. The approach will be developed in consultation with the EWG Expert Group on Energy Efficiency and Conservation (EGEEC) and the TPT-WG Intermodal and ITS Experts Group (IIEG).

There is a risk that the consultant would not be able to come up with an effective and analytically sound approach.  However, this risk should be minimized by the competitive bidding process, as many consultants in APEC economies are well qualified in analysis of transport, energy and environmental issues, and as members of the EWG EGEEC and TPT-WG IIEG can suggest suitable candidates.  The risk should also be limited by the ability of experts from EGEEC and IIEG to review and modify the analytic approach proposed by the consultants. In addition, the Project Overseers in close collaboration with Program Director Andrey Plam will ensure that the timeframe for the project will be effectively implemented by the consultants with expected outcomes within the proposed budget.

 (b)    Preparation of Draft Report: During the second six months of the project, the consultants will analyze energy and environmental benefits of intermodal freight strategies according to the approach developed.  They will select case studies from APEC economies that have adopted intermodal freight strategies, drawing upon examples identified in the Survey of Policies and Programs that Promote Fuel –Efficient Transport (May 2008) and follow-up workshop (March 2009).  They will then apply the agreed methodology to these cases and draft a report on the extent to which such strategies have reduced freight shipment transit times and costs, curbed automotive fuel requirements, and limited emissions of carbon dioxide and other pollutants.

There is a risk that the chosen consultants would be insufficiently capable or diligent in selecting the case studies and carrying out the analysis according to the agreed methodology.  However, this risk should be small if the consultants are selected from a competitive field of analysts. Project managers will also actively engage the Expert Group on Energy Efficiency and Conservation and the Intermodal and Intelligent Transport Systems Expert Group to elicit a wide and representative range of case examples for intermodal freight in APEC economies.

 (c)    Preparation of Final Report:  During the next four months of the project, the consultants will consider comments on the draft report from the Expert Group on Energy Efficiency and Conservation and the Intermodal and ITS Experts Group.  They will then prepare a final report incorporating the comments received, revising the analysis as appropriate to take the comments into account.  The report will contain a two-page executive summary of key findings.

There is a risk that comments from the two Expert Groups would be insufficiently substantive or prompt to allow a useful revision of the draft report.  There is also a risk that the consultant would be insufficiently attentive to the comments received or insufficiently capable of taking them into account.  However, these risks should be minimized by the diversity and variety of experts commenting and the competitive selection process for the consultant chosen. Project managers will work with the consultants to ensure that expert comments are incorporated.

(d)       Capacity Building Outreach WorkshopDuring the final four months of the project, the consultants will organize and convene a capacity building outreach workshop to disseminate the project results.  Particular attention will be paid to ensuring that participants from developing and developed economies alike are able to assimilate the key findings of the report so that they can replicate and carry forward successful, energy-saving intermodal freight strategies in their economies. The workshop will review key findings from the report, highlight key facets of successful intermodal freight strategies for developing economies, and assess the potential energy and environmental benefits in developing economies in light of anticipated infrastructure investment.  Experts and officials from a wide range of APEC economies will be invited to help ensure that effective energy-efficient freight strategies can be widely adopted throughout the region.  Funding is specifically sought for the participation of five experts from travel-eligible economies, but participation of additional experts and officials is also anticipated, both from travel-eligible economies and non-travel-eligible economies that are expected to be interested. The workshop will be organized back-to-back with a meeting of the Transport Working Group to ensure that experts and officials from a wide-range of APEC economies, with a wide network of active contacts within their home economies, are able to participate without additional expense.  There is a risk that the consultants would lack sufficient skill in organizing and conducting the capacity building outreach workshop.  There is also a risk that too few experts and officials from too narrow a range of APEC economies would participate.  However, the first risk, related to workshop organization, should be small in view of the likely availability of conference organizers that could be subcontracted to take care of logistical arrangements.  Project managers will be actively engaged with the Energy Working Group and Transportation Working Group to solicit the participation of key policy makers and experts from each economy. Project managers will also closely supervise the consultant to see that the workshop sessions are comprehensive and that the report on workshop discussions is concise and comprehensive.  Finally, by organizing the meeting back-to-back with a meeting of the Transport Working Group, which is always well attended, broad and highly qualified participation is virtually assured.  The second risk will be mitigated through the active involvement of project overseers in ensuring that the capacity building outreach workshop is publicized through the Energy Working Group and Transportation Working Group, and by the delegates to both of these groups in their respective economies.

----------------------

It is anticipated that more than half of the APEC economies may participate in the project, in view of the number of economies that are actively in the work of the Intermodal and ITS Experts Group and the Expert Group on Energy Efficiency and Conservation.  This is particularly likely since several economies have already put intermodal freight strategies in place and should be interested in knowing more about their potential benefits.  These economies include Australia, Canada, Japan and New Zealand among developed APEC economies and China, Indonesia, Thailand and Vietnam among developing APEC economies.  The Philippines will participate as a co-sponsoring economy, in addition to Canada, China, and Australia. All interested economies are expected to provide information about the intermodal freight strategies they have put in place, including such information as may be available on the costs and the measured impacts on freight transit times and costs, energy use, and emissions of atmospheric pollutants.

Risks

See Work Plan

Monitoring and Evaluation

Current status:  Several APEC economies have individually implemented intermodal freight strategies that reduce the energy-intensity of freight transport by encouraging freight shippers to shift from energy-intensive transport modes like trucks to energy-economising modes like rail, barge and ship. The use of less energy-intensive transport modes for freight shipments subsequently results in a reduction of transport fuel requirements.  According to the Survey of Policies and Programs that Promote Fuel-Efficient Transport in APEC Economies (EWG 03/2007A, completed in May 2008) and a follow-up workshop in Singapore (EWG 02/2008A, March 2009), economies with important examples of intermodal freight include Canada, Japan, New Zealand, and United States.  Developing economies such as China, Indonesia, Thailand and Viet Nam could also benefit from improved coordination between road, rail and shipping of freight.  But there is no systematic understanding across the APEC region of the extent to which intermodal freight strategies can shorten freight transit times, reduce energy needs and costs for businesses, and limit atmospheric emissions of urban air pollutants and carbon dioxide.

End-of-project target: By sharing information in a systematic way, the project will make it possible to give transport, energy and environmental ministers and leaders a clear understanding of the potential for intermodal freight strategies to reduce energy needs and oil imports, and reduce the overall carbon footprint of transport in APEC economies.  This should broaden and accelerate investments in freight-oriented vehicle, system, and infrastructure development, thereby limiting upward pressure on freight transit times and costs, oil prices, oil import dependency, and global carbon emissions.  Capacity for implementation of cost-effective intermodal freight strategies will be enhanced in both developed and developing APEC economies, with resultant fuel savings and carbon emissions reductions.

Linkages

The project has been jointly developed by the Intermodal and ITS Experts Group of the APEC Transportation Working Group and the Expert Group on Energy Efficiency and Conservation of the APEC Energy Working Group. It has been endorsed by both EWG and TPT-WG.

-----------------------------

The project will help fulfill the opportunity to enhance energy security through more fuel-efficient transport that Energy Ministers identified at Gyeongju in October 2005 and reaffirmed at Darwin in May 2007, and which APEC Ministers and Leaders noted in Lima in 2008. It will build upon the survey of policies for fuel efficient transport that was completed in May 2008 and the workshop on fuel efficient transport policies that was conducted in March 2009.  Proposed future projects related to this proposal include the examination of the energy and environmental benefits of other key policy options identified, including transit oriented development and bus rapid transit systems.   Since the APEC region consumes about half the world’s energy and oil and accounts for about half the world’s carbon emissions, it is a highly appropriate grouping of economies in which to examine the range of measures by which oil consumption could effectively be limited and carbon emissions reduced.  The findings of this and related projects on the energy and environmental benefits of fuel-efficient transport options willl be reported to energy and transport ministers at forthcoming meetings, in order to encourage the endorsement and dissemination of these options throughout the region.  Expert professionals, economy officials, and others (including Intermodal and ITS Experts Group members and others from the TPT-WG) who review the project report and participate in the outreach workshop will be able to take the key lessons home to networks of transportation planners, energy policymakers and freight companies in their home economies to be applied. Then more fuel-efficient freight transportation tstrategies could be applied in a broad range of APEC economies, reducing the oil dependency and carbon footprint of freight transportation.

Sustainability

Not Applicable

Project Overseers

Not Applicable

Cost Efficiency

Not Applicable

Drawdown Timetable

Not Applicable

Direct Labour

Not Applicable

Waivers

Not Applicable

Are there any supporting document attached?

No 
Attachments
Version: 7.0 
Created at 31/08/2012 17:13  by System Account 
Last modified at 02/10/2017 15:56  by Lucy Phua 
Version HistoryVersion History

Project No.

Project Title

Project Status

Publication (if any)

Fund Account

Sub-fund

Project Year

Project Session

APEC Funding

Co-funding Amount

Total Project Value

Sponsoring Forum

Topics

Committee

Other Fora Involved

Other Non-APEC Stakeholders Involved

Proposing Economy(ies)

Co-Sponsoring Economies

Expected Start Date

Expected Completion Date

Project Proponent Name 1

Job Title 1

Organization 1

Postal Address 1

Telephone 1

Fax 1

Email 1

Project Proponent Name 2

Job Title 2

Organization 2

Postal Address 2

Telephone 2

Fax 2

Email 2

Declaration

Project Summary

Relevance

Objectives

Alignment

TILF/ASF Justification

Beneficiaries and Outputs

Dissemination

Gender

Work Plan

Risks

Monitoring and Evaluation

Linkages

Sustainability

Project Overseers

Cost Efficiency

Drawdown Timetable

Direct Labour

Waivers

Are there any supporting document attached?

hdFldAdmin

Project Number

Previous Fora

Secretariat Comments

Reprogramming Notes

Consolidated QAF

Endorsement By Fora

PD Sign Off

Batch

Forum Priority

Committee Ranking Category

Committee Priority

PDM Priority

Priority Within Funding Category

Monitoring Report Received

Completion Report Received

PMU Field 1

PMU Field 2

PMU Field 3

On Behalf Of

Proposal Status

Originating Sub-Forum

Approval Status
Attachments
Content Type: Standard Proposal
Version:
Created at by
Last modified at by
Go Search