Project Title

Promotion of Indigenous Vegetables for Coping Climate Change and Food Security in APEC 

Project Year

2011   

Project Number

ATC 01 2011A 

Project Session

Session 1   

Project Type

Standard 

Project Status

Completed Project   
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Project No.

ATC 01 2011A 

Project Title

Promotion of Indigenous Vegetables for Coping Climate Change and Food Security in APEC 

Project Status

Completed Project 

Publication (if any)

 

Fund Account

APEC Support Fund 

Sub-fund

ASF: General Fund 

Project Year

2011 

Project Session

Session 1 

APEC Funding

81,553 

Co-funding Amount

60,500 

Total Project Value

142,053 

Sponsoring Forum

Agricultural Technical Cooperation Working Group (ATCWG) 

Topics

Agriculture 

Committee

SOM Steering Committee on Economic and Technical Cooperation (SCE) 

Other Fora Involved

Not Applicable / Other 

Other Non-APEC Stakeholders Involved

Not Applicable

Proposing Economy(ies)

Chinese Taipei 

Co-Sponsoring Economies

China; Thailand 

Expected Start Date

29/04/2011 

Expected Completion Date

31/12/2012 

Project Proponent Name 1

San Tai Wang 

Job Title 1

Associate Researcher 

Organization 1

Fengshan Tropical Horticultural Experiment Branch, Agricultural Research Institute 

Postal Address 1

No.4, Yuanyi Ln., Wenshan Rd., Fengshan Dist., Kaohsiung City 830 

Telephone 1

886-7-7310191-ext:701 

Fax 1

886-7-7315590 

Email 1

stwang@fthes-tari.gov.tw 

Project Proponent Name 2

Not Applicable 

Job Title 2

Not Applicable 

Organization 2

Not Applicable 

Postal Address 2

Not Applicable 

Telephone 2

Not Applicable 

Fax 2

Not Applicable 

Email 2

Not Applicable 

Declaration

San-Tai Wang 

Project Summary

Food security and climate change are now recognized as the major problem facing the globe. Climate change and food security can be addressed together by transforming agriculture and adopting practices that are “climate-smart”. Through the promotion of indigenous vegetables (IVs) can mitigate the impact of climate change on vegetable supply in the APEC region, balance year-round nutrition, provide new market opportunities and enhance farm income. Furthermore, since vegetable growing in multiple cropping systems requires high labor inputs, the project could benefit rural women by creating employment opportunities in the developing economies. Besides, this project may also enhance balanced nutrition and prevent degenerative diseases in both developed and developing APEC member economies.

Four days workshop, including one day field trip, will be held in Chinese Taipei in November 2011. The workshop will be conducted to facilitate the exchange, evaluation, and utilization of indigenous vegetable in the APEC region.

Relevance

Climate change is now widely recognized as the major environmental problem facing the globe. Agriculture not only contributes to climate change and is affected by it, consequently the food supply; it is also one of the few sectors that can provide solutions. Climate change and food security can be addressed together by transforming agriculture and adopting practices that are "climate-smart". A number of production systems are already being used by farmers and food producers to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, adapt to climate change, and reduce vulnerability. Among them, indigenous vegetables (IVs) stand out. Indigenous vegetables refer to those plants grown primarily in their centers of origins or diversity, or to those introduced species that adapt to the environment in a given area over a defined time. They are often used in marginal areas of the globe because of their adaptability to harsh environments with various types of stresses. On account of this, IVs could help solve problems associated with global warming by reducing the demand on pesticides and fertilizers derived from non-renewable energy source and so lessen the carbon footprint of the food supply chain.

Apart from the above, for anyone concerns about farm income and micronutrient deficiency in developing APEC member economies, in particular women, IVs offer an important entry point. Indigenous vegetables provide an important means of livelihood. And for many actors, mostly women, of the food supply chain; they are a major source of income. Moreover, IVs are excellent sources of vitamins and minerals to prevent the occurrence of micronutrient deficiency, especially among women of childbearing age and children under five years old. This is a major cause of weakened immunity to diseases, leading to increased mortality in vulnerable groups. Indigenous vegetables are valuable because of their ability to fit into year round production and having their nutritional value. Other than micronutrients, some IVs contain also varying amounts of health-promoting phytochemicals that can fight against a broad range of degenerative diseases, including cancers, diabetes, heart disease, and eye diseases. This feature benefits not only the poor in developing APEC member economies but also the rich in developed APEC member economies.

Objectives

The overall goal of this project is to increase utilization of IVs that can contribute to enhance people’s health, economic and social status, and to “climate-smart” production system that mitigate as well as adapt climate change. The key objectives of the project are:

       To discuss climate change impact on vegetable production and consumption
      as related to nutritional and economic security for rural and urban poor

       To deliberate possible options for mainstreaming indigenous vegetables
      into “smart-agriculture” and food security


       To identify the needs and areas of collaborative research and development
      on IVs in the APEC region


       To establish the mechanism for exchanging promising indigenous vegetables
      among member economies
that include member economies with large
      collections of plant genetic resources such as Japan, People's Republic of
      China, Russia and the United States, and with high diversity of  indigenous
      vegetable like Indonesia, Thailand, Mexico and Peru.

Alignment

The proposed project is in response to the 17th 2009 APEC Economic Leader’s Meeting on “Sustaining Growth and Connecting the Region” in November 7-10, 2009. At this meeting, the leaders agreed that Declarations and Ministerial Statements which indicated the climate change and food security is the most important issue relevant to the sustaining growth. The project also responds to the pleas by APEC Senior Officials that APEC should explore opportunities to work to share experiences and knowledge to enhance research and development cooperation in food security-related fields. Besides, this project is endorsed by the Ministerial Meeting on Food Security, Niigata, 2010.

Climate change offers an opportunity for us to think beyond the classical approach to food production. New vegetable crops using native species hold the key to the future of sustainable agricultural production in the APEC region, especially for the member economies that are resource poor.

As the effects of climate change are increasingly felt around the world, there is a strong demand among international communities to find solutions to problems facing crop production such as drought and heat stresses. The APEC member economies may play a significant role in finding solutions to problems caused by climate change. This may involve exchange of genetic materials, and collaboration in research and development.

TILF/ASF Justification

Not Applicable

Beneficiaries and Outputs

·  The primary beneficiary of this project would be the APEC developing economies government agricultural policy-makers of member economies who can see themselves and have taken advantages of using indigenous vegetables to cope with climate change and food security after the workshop. This project can also provide capacity for agricultural policy-makers from APEC developong economies. ·  The secondary beneficiary of this project would be those researchers and extension agents from developing economies who may not usually have the resourse and technology. This project will also increase their knowlodge an dto share ideas ·  The third beneficiary of this project would be the private sectors, and ABAC included, who are engaged in vegetable seed, food processing and health food industries. They will be in a better position to capitalize indigenous vegetables for the development of small and medium enterprises in developing member economies.

·  The overall beneficiary of the project would be the rural and urban vulnerable population who are suffering micronutrient malnutrition, farmers, especially women, who are impacted by climate change, and the general public who face food insecurity and suffer from unbalanced diets.

Dissemination

a. The nature of the target audience

The target audience would be mostly agriculture-related officials (preferable senior officials) and experts who are familiar with the issues of concern. The results of the project should also be accessible to the researchers and general public as well.

b. The form and content

Information on APEC member economies’ food/nutrient security policies as related to climate change and the role of vegetables in generating income and overcoming micronutrient malnutrition.

c. Format (e.g. hard copies, floppy discs, internet uploading)

All related documents will be uploaded to the APEC/ATCWG website for publicity.

d. Number of copies for the publication;

Documents will be made available online.

e. A publicity plan

1) Press releases on the value of indigenous vegetables for the media as well as online links.

2) The follow-up, collaborative activities will include field demonstrations, school gardening, farmers’ schools, marketing promotions, etc.

Gender

In the development of this project, female participants are always the critical part, and at the same time, we will invite the female delegate from each Economy.

Most vegetable farmers in developing member economies are female. Most women in these economies are also suffering from micronutrient malnutrition. Indigenous vegetables have special significance to the women. One of the objectives of the project is to look at food security issues from a broader perspective, including gender concerns and the viewpoint of the most vulnerable.

By brining gender concerns into the deliberation of policy options towards the food crisis, this project would provide gender sensitive policy recommendations for government officials. Potential outcomes of the project may include: commitment to strengthening human capital investment and supporting small and medium enterprises, so that little girls and women can attain their full potential socially and economically. That way, women can fully participate in more productive farming activities and be well integrated into mainstream economy, in both the national and global levels.

Most importantly, we will also invite the active participations from GFPN, stating from the organization to the implementation of this project.

Work Plan

Timeline

Key Events and Deliverables

April 2011

Submission and approval of the full proposal

May 2011

Communication to ATCWG and member economies for their recommendation of scientific committee members and potential resource persons; formation of the local workshop organizing committee

June 2011

Preparation of the tentative workshop program; invitation to the member economies; communication to the member economies for the preparation of member economy reports on types, production scale, use, seed source, research programs and institutions on indigenous vegetables; and invitation to the resource persons

July 2011

Booking of the venue and hotel accommodation

August 2011

Selection and preparation of promising indigenous vegetables for the workshop field demonstration

September 2011

Care of indigenous vegetables in the field demonstration plots

October 2011

The workshop program agenda finalized; venue set; and demonstration plots prepared for observation; transportation for the workshop participants arranged

November 2011

The workshop on “Collaboration on the promotion of indigenous vegetables for coping with climate change and food security in APEC” conducted; ATCWG indigenous vegetable network formed; network coordinator selected; the mechanism for the exchange of promising IVs among member economies established; promising IVs and problem areas for collaborative research and development selected; institutional framework for collaborative research and development harmonized;  principles and procedures for establishing IV database or knowledge bank established; training workshops on specified areas planned

December 2011

The workshop proceedings on CDs and ATCWG website published; project report prepared and submitted

January 2012

Identification of funding support for the agreed follow-up network activities such as collaborative trials of promising IVs, database and/or knowledge bank on IVs, training workshops, etc.

Risks

Duplication:

After reviewing the APEC Project Database, this project is not duplicated with all of the APEC projects and activities. Possible risk management strategies: close consultation and cooperation with relevant member economies.

Lack of participation:

Among the ten members of ASEAN, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, Brunei Darussalam, Thailand and Viet Nam are also member economies of APEC. They are fully aware of the potential contributions of indigenous vegetables to meet the challenges of climate change and food security, thus proposed the above mentioned program on indigenous vegetables. This very workshop will widen the partnership among APEC member economies to engage in the realization of the potentials.

Outputs not of sufficient quality:

The workshop organizing committee will invite several resource persons who are internationally-recognized experts in indigenous vegetables, climate change, food security, and social marketing of orphan crops to facilitate the workshop proceeding to reach its objectives.

Monitoring and Evaluation

·  The themes and topics for deliberation, design of report for member economies, correspondences with resource speakers and facilitators, preparation and distribution of workshop program and announcement ·  Number of resource speakers and facilitators, number of participants, resolutions reached for the mechanism to follow-up collaborative research and development activities ·  Information gathered on the agro-ecological setting, production, cultural managements and socio-economic significance of indigenous vegetables (IVs), food and other uses of IVs, seed production and availability of IVs ·  Information gathered on botanical, physiological, agronomic and nutritional aspects of specific IVs ·  Before ending of workshop, poll will be conducted for each session to survey responses of participants

·  Proceedings and resolutions for the follow-up collaborative R&D activities

Linkages

The very workshop in a sense is a capacity building on strategic planning for research and development on indigenous vegetables for some member economies. The capacity strengthening of strategic planning is part of the objectives of the Human Resources Development Working Group. And for this reason, the communication on the workshop will be effected with this working group

Potential areas of collaboration between ATCWG and other APEC working groups after the workshop include: capacity building activities, rural infrastructure and efficiency of the food supply chain, efficient use of energy, social safety nets and health care in the rural areas, agriculture-related small and medium enterprises in the rural areas, and public-private partnership in vegetable seed industry and agricultural biotechnology. Thus during the workshop deliberations on follow-up, collaborative R&D activities, the participants will be directed to discuss the possibility of linkages with the following APEC working groups on specific areas of complementary efforts:

·     Human Resources Development Working Group: to design appropriate methods to share knowledge, experience, and skills in strengthening R&D capacity on IVs. ·     Telecommunications and Information Working Group: to improve information infrastructure for sharing knowledge and information on IVs, and to build the database on IVs. ·     Industrial Science and Technology Working Group: to strengthen research and development management capacity on IVs. ·     Small and Medium Enterprises Working Group: to capitalize and transform the potential of health-promoting values of IVs into SME in developing member economies.

·     Gender Focal Point Network: to integrate gender considerations into the follow-up, collaborative activities on IV research and development focusing on improving women’s income generation and nutrition.

Sustainability

·   Resource persons from AVRDC-The World Vegetable Center, Biodiversity International, Crops for the Future, Kasetsart University, Asia and Pacific Seed Association, University of California-Davis, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, and others will be invited to facilitate the workshop deliberations. The workshop is designed to engage all participants in interactive discussions with the resource persons, as well as to identify concrete options for designing collaborative R&D strategies on IVs in the context of climate change and food/nutrient security. ·   The workshop should provide the participants with enhanced capacity to: identify/understand impacts, vulnerability and adaptation of climate change on vegetable production and consumption; select and implement adaptation actions with promising IVs; and enhance regional cooperation to better address climate change and food security. ·   The workshop’s proceedings and documentation will be electronically published on APEC internet and the most relevant outcomes will be used as the base for future collaborative R&D. ·   The mechanism for the exchange of promising IVs will be devised during the workshop so to facilitate the follow-up activities. ·   Specific areas of follow-up, collaborative R&D activities will be identified during the workshop. Likely activities include: exchange of promising IVs for evaluation of abiotic and biotic stress tolerance as related to climate change, and nutrition and health values as related to overcome micronutrient malnutrition by participating member economies; establishment of IV database and knowledge bank; social marketing of proven promising IVs, etc. And projects will be developed with ATCWG and other relevant APEC working groups for the possible funding and linkage with on-going programs such as Horticulture Collaborative Research Support Program supported by the US Agency for International Development, and others.

·   With the help from AVRDC, Chinese Taipei will endeavor continuelly to implement and promote the research related to this project.

Project Overseers

San-Tai Wang will oversee the project. He is a vegetable breeder specialized in leafy vegetables which include important indigenous vegetables of amaranth and non-heading Chinese cabbage. He has established evaluation system of amaranth resistant to white rust which is a serious problem in hot and humid tropical conditions, and developed and released a white rust resistant amaranth cultivar. He has also developed a evaluation method of kang-kong resistant to white rust. Besides, he has developed two hybrids of non-heading Chinese cabbage from local open pollinating population. He is currently cooperating with pathologists to confirm different races of black rot of crucifer crops in Chinese Taipei. In accordance with the objectives of ATCWG, Mr. Wang will implement the project under the direction of Dr. Junne-Jih Chen, Director-General of the COA’s Agricultural Research Institute (ARI); Dr. Kan-Shu Chen, Director of Fengshan Tropical Horticultural Experiment Branch of ARI; and Dr. Su-San Chang, Director-General of the COA Department of International Affairs.

The project will also invite Chungchi George Kuo, senior advisor of Science & Technology Policy Research and Information Center of National Applied Research Laboratories in Chinese Taipei as a consultant. Prior to his current position, he had served as plant physiologist, head of plant physiology department, director of crop improvement program, and director of international cooperation program at AVRDC-The World Vegetable Center since 1975. His scientific research and administrative responsibilities at AVRDC covered stress physiology, plant biotechnology, crop improvement, vegetable-based approaches to enhance health, indigenous vegetables, identification of opportunities for developing collaborative projects with the national agricultural research and extension systems, and effective cooperative programs in Southeast Asia, Central Asia, Central America, South Asia and West Africa. His current research interest is in agricultural science and technology policy and technology foresight. He has a published an acclaimed book on indigenous vegetables.

Cost Efficiency

       A high level of self-financing from supporters contributing to labour, facilities,
      travel and other budget areas


       Disseminating project outputs electronically, rather than publishing hard
      copies


       Making efficient use of consultant or clerical hours


       Employing consultants with experience and a good reputation working on
      similar projects


      Using workshop/symposium participants as presenters, enhancing
      participatory processes


       Providing capacity and resources for participants to return to their economies
      and organize similar events (e.g. training the trainers), or support for
      implementation of outputs (e.g. for best practices or recommendations) in
      APEC economies


       Sustainability of outputs and their relevance – demonstrating that reports,
      websites, research etc. will be used and updated so it remains relevant in the
      medium to long term.


       Demonstrated value of outputs or outcomes to other APEC fora.

Drawdown Timetable

Not Applicable

Direct Labour

Not Applicable

Waivers

Not Applicable

Are there any supporting document attached?

No 
Attachments
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Version HistoryVersion History

Project No.

Project Title

Project Status

Publication (if any)

Fund Account

Sub-fund

Project Year

Project Session

APEC Funding

Co-funding Amount

Total Project Value

Sponsoring Forum

Topics

Committee

Other Fora Involved

Other Non-APEC Stakeholders Involved

Proposing Economy(ies)

Co-Sponsoring Economies

Expected Start Date

Expected Completion Date

Project Proponent Name 1

Job Title 1

Organization 1

Postal Address 1

Telephone 1

Fax 1

Email 1

Project Proponent Name 2

Job Title 2

Organization 2

Postal Address 2

Telephone 2

Fax 2

Email 2

Declaration

Project Summary

Relevance

Objectives

Alignment

TILF/ASF Justification

Beneficiaries and Outputs

Dissemination

Gender

Work Plan

Risks

Monitoring and Evaluation

Linkages

Sustainability

Project Overseers

Cost Efficiency

Drawdown Timetable

Direct Labour

Waivers

Are there any supporting document attached?

hdFldAdmin

Project Number

Previous Fora

Secretariat Comments

Reprogramming Notes

Consolidated QAF

Endorsement By Fora

PD Sign Off

Batch

Forum Priority

Committee Ranking Category

Committee Priority

PDM Priority

Priority Within Funding Category

Monitoring Report Received

Completion Report Received

PMU Field 1

PMU Field 2

PMU Field 3

On Behalf Of

Proposal Status

Originating Sub-Forum

Approval Status
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