Project Title

Combating Human Trafficking by Addressing Illicit Uses of Transportation 

Project Year

2019   

Project Number

TPT 04 2019A 

Project Session

Session 1   

Project Type

Standard 

Project Status

Project in Implementation   
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Project No.

TPT 04 2019A 

Project Title

Combating Human Trafficking by Addressing Illicit Uses of Transportation 

Project Status

Project in Implementation 

Publication (if any)

 

Fund Account

APEC Support Fund 

Sub-fund

ASF: Women and the Economy 

Project Year

2019 

Project Session

Session 1 

APEC Funding

50,000 

Co-funding Amount

60,096 

Total Project Value

110,096 

Sponsoring Forum

Transportation Working Group (TPTWG) 

Topics

Transportation 

Committee

SOM Steering Committee on Economic and Technical Cooperation (SCE) 

Other Fora Involved

 

Other Non-APEC Stakeholders Involved

 

Proposing Economy(ies)

United States 

Co-Sponsoring Economies

Canada; Papua New Guinea; Peru; Chinese Taipei 

Expected Start Date

01/09/2019 

Expected Completion Date

31/08/2020 

Project Proponent Name 1

Jason Hill 

Job Title 1

Senior Advisor 

Organization 1

US Department of Transportation 

Postal Address 1

Not Applicable 

Telephone 1

(1-202) 4930007 

Fax 1

Not Applicable 

Email 1

Jason.Hill@dot.gov 

Project Proponent Name 2

Nicole Bambas 

Job Title 2

Senior Advisor 

Organization 2

US Department of Transportation 

Postal Address 2

Not Applicable 

Telephone 2

(1-202) 4930007 

Fax 2

Not Applicable 

Email 2

Nicole.Bambas@dot.gov 

Declaration

Jason Hill and Nicole Bambas 

Project Summary

Human trafficking is a scourge on the APEC region.  Women and girls are disproportionately victimized by this crime, robbing them of their independence, economic opportunity, and ability to exercise agency over their careers. This project combats human trafficking by and developing tools to help identify potential victims who utilize transportation systems, which can reduce barriers for vulnerable populations to join the economy, increasing economic growth.  By surveying ongoing efforts among the APEC economies related to transportation, this project will develop a set of best practices and educational resources for employee training and public awareness to be shared in a spring 2020 workshop.  These resources can be used by each economy to educate transportation employees and the traveling public to report potential human trafficking to the proper authorities.

Relevance

Relevance – Region: Human trafficking is a $150 billion industry that disproportionally affects women and girls, not only making them victims of criminal activities, but also denying them economic opportunities and independence.  Of the 24.9 million people estimated to be victims of human trafficking globally, women and girls make up 99% of the victims in commercial sexual exploitation and 58% in other sectors.  Sixty-six percent are trafficked within the Pacific Rim, making this a problem that inordinately affects women globally and within the APEC region.  Human trafficking results from a broad range of factors, including poverty, lack of opportunities in the formal economy, and non-inclusive development.  Regardless of factor, the  women and girls trafficked lose their economic agency, inhibiting their ability to achieve economic opportunity and gender equality. 

When victims travel to meet their trafficker initially, or use transportation during the course of their victimization, an opportunity arises for properly equipped transportation employees and the traveling public to identify and report a tip to law enforcement. Transportation employees and the traveling public are uniquely positioned to alert law enforcement authorities to potential incidents of human trafficking that may occur on any form of transportation. 

This project is designed to identify and share best practices that APEC economies can use to better understand the above-mentioned factors and complicated root causes behind human trafficking and raise public awareness regarding human trafficking across all transportation, including through:1) the development of tools to promote economic inclusion for former victims of trafficking, in order to enable them to better access jobs and economic opportunity.2) the development of tools to identify and report possible incidents of human trafficking, and 3) mechanisms to improve how suspected cases of human trafficking are quickly relayed to law enforcement authorities.  This project directly links to APEC-wide efforts to stop human trafficking as well as facilitates greater economic opportunities and independence for women throughout the region. 

Relevance – Eligibility and Fund Priorities: This project aligns with the goals of the Women and the Economy Sub-Fund, particularly in its objective of advancing women’s economic inclusion and its effort to leverage the TPTWG’s previous work on combating human trafficking and engaging women in transportation careers through the Women in Transportation Task Force. Reducing the number of human trafficking victims, the majority of whom are women and girls, will enable these women to have greater economic agency (criteria 4D) and give them independent access to the market (4B), rather than having their financial outcomes forcibly taken from them.  By seeking to engage the public, law enforcement community, transportation industry, and other stakeholders, this project will bring together a broad range of groups, as required under criteria 3. 

Relevance – Capacity Building: Human trafficking is a global problem that affects every APEC economy.  Counter-trafficking efforts benefit from a comprehensive strategy that includes leadership commitment, including public/private stakeholders and survivors, policies, reporting protocols, employee training, public awareness, data collection, and information-sharing.  Each APEC economy can benefit from the identification and discussion of best practices and educational resources for training law enforcement, the transportation industry, and members of the public on identifying and reporting suspected cases of human trafficking.  While developing economies often have fewer resources to devote to combating human trafficking, their contributions to the development of best practices and resources are critical in creating effective solutions.

Objectives

The core objective of this project is to: 1) reduce the number of human trafficking victims in the APEC region, particularly women and girls, by building awareness regarding the role that transportation networks play in facilitating human trafficking, and 2) for public and private transportation entities to educate their employees and the traveling public on identifying and reporting suspected instances of human trafficking.  This project will survey efforts by APEC economies to promote economic growth, educate the public, law enforcement, and the transportation industry on how to identify, investigate, and report suspected cases of human trafficking.  The project will then develop a set of best practices and educational materials to be shared with APEC economies in a spring 2020 workshop.

Alignment

Alignment - APEC:  This project is in line with the APEC priorities and goals with respect to:

·  “discouraging the use of any transportation network by human traffickers within and across our borders. By training the general public, transportation service providers and APEC transportation ministries to identify human trafficking that is hidden in plain sight, we can save lives, halt illicit economic activity, …and demonstrate our integral role in the wellbeing of our respective societies.” (Transportation Ministerial Statement, Papua New Guinea, 2017)

·  “promoting the full advancement of women and girls as a means of realising sustainable development, economic growth and gender equality.” (The Chair’s Era Kone Statement, 2018)

·  “encouraging more women’s activities in transport and more enforced measures against human trafficking.” (Transportation Working Group Strategic Plan for 2018-2020)

Alignment – Forum: In its 2018-2020 Strategic Plan, a key objective of the Transportation Working Group is to increase measures against human trafficking.  This aligns with the 2017 Transportation Ministerial Statement, which tasked the working group with addressing the transportation’s role in facilitating human trafficking by developing tools to mitigate the crime.

TILF/ASF Justification

Not Applicable.

Beneficiaries and Outputs

Outputs: 

1

Research Work/Report:  U.S. project implementers will create a survey for all APEC economies asking key questions, including (1)What measures are most effective and adaptable in enhancing employment and inclusive growth; (2) what general and transportation-specific policies and practices has the economy put into place to combat human trafficking?; (3) has the economy developed any training materials or implemented any public awareness campaigns addressing transportation’s role in human trafficking?; (4) other questions as appropriate.  Input regarding these surveys will be combined into a baseline desktop report, self-funded by the project implementer, of existing transportation-related counter-trafficking efforts within the APEC region, which will inform the planned workshop discussions.  This work will primarily take place at the U.S. Department of Transportation, and is anticipated to occur from September 2019 (creation of survey) through March 2020 (final draft of the baseline desktop report).

2

Workshop:  U.S. project implementers will host a one-day workshop on the margins of TPT-WG 49 (April/May 2020, To Be Confirmed) focusing on three major elements: (1) Briefly reviewing the outcomes of the baseline desktop report and gaps in capacity, training, and resources identified from the surveys; (2) Discussing how transportation systems are susceptible to human trafficking by highlighting case studies and known examples; (3) Highlighting the role of human trafficking awareness campaigns to educate transportation operators, employees, and the general public on identifying and reporting suspected cases of human trafficking;  (4) Discussing the resources, personnel training materials, and public awareness materials (signs, advertisements, etc.) needed to address APEC-specific challenges economies are facing in fighting human trafficking within the transportation system (including highlighting many existing resources available from the implementing economy as well as from a range of stakeholders from the APEC region).  At the conclusion of the workshop, project implementers will  conduct an interactive exercise to encourage participants to share key observations and takeaways that will help build and augment the best practices that will be shared in the Project Report (see Output 3) to support economies in their counter-trafficking efforts.  In total, each discussion section represents one module of the workshop, with approximately 1.5 hours devoted to each section, and a 45-minute concluding exercise.

3

Best Practices (published as a Project Report)Following the conclusion of the workshop, U.S. project implementers will revise and clarify the best practices developed at the conclusion of the workshop, working by email and conference calls with workshop participants to finalize a set of best practices in the form of a Project Report that share lessons learned as well as the location of available training and public awareness resources, as discussed during the workshop.  These practices will be finalized in the June/July 2020 timeframe and will be shared with all TPT-WG members, as well as at the next TPT-WG meeting, with regional stakeholders, including NGOs and the transportation industry, and published formally through the APEC Secretariat.

The Best Practices will focus on high-level strategies for: (1) understanding that transportation systems can facilitate the movement of human trafficking victims; (2) responding to transportation’s role in human trafficking by creating countermeasures that reduce its effectiveness for criminal activity; and (3) sharing techniques for the development and implementation of awareness campaigns that inform transport operators, their employees, and the general public of how to identify potential trafficking and how to report it.

The Project Report in total will be approximately 8-10 pages.  It will include one to two pages of the Best Practices.  Following that, the Project Report will also outline the discussions during each module of the workshop and include links to the resources and training materials discussed above (and in Outcome 1).

4

Completion Report:  Project implementers will develop the Completion Report, which will be submitted to the Secretariat at the conclusion of the project.  This Report will outline the results and efficacy of the above outputs, and track initial outcomes following the workshop and distribution of the Project Report.

Outcomes:

1

Implementation of an economy-level counter-trafficking awareness campaign:  Based on the best practices addressed at the proposed workshop, each economy will be encouraged to use the available resources and training programs identified during the workshop to develop and implement a counter-trafficking public awareness campaign, specifically focusing on the role of transportation in human trafficking, its effects on economic opportunities for women, and methods transportation operators and the general public can employ to report suspected cases of human trafficking.  Specifically, these training materials include:  (1) literature, web-based educational tools, PowerPoint information slide decks, and other written materials that inform transportation operators and their employees on how to identify potential human trafficking victims and report their suspicious to appropriate authorities; (2) literature, information, and written materials distributed to government transportation authorities to share with their law enforcement agencies on how to receive and respond to reports of suspected trafficking; and (3) visual and written information materials that transportation agencies and operators can put up in transit stations and distribute to customers making the general public aware of human trafficking and how to identify and report suspected cases.

This metric can be tracked by the number of economies that  have launched or are preparing to launch human trafficking awareness campaigns; further, it can also be tracked by the number of transportation companies or operators who have partnerered with their transportation authority and commited to training their employees to identify and report suspected cases of trafficking, informing their passengers through advertising campaigns, or both.

2

Reduction of transportation’s role in facilitating human trafficking:  The best practices will highlight training materials and resources that economies and their domestic transport operators can use to reduce cases of human trafficking by providing transportation employees with the tools to identify and report suspected cases of human trafficking.  By improving the transportation sector workforce’s overall knowledge of human trafficking and how it occurs within the transportation system, employees can be empowered to notify law enforcement and other officials to take immediate action to address suspected cases.  This metric can be measured in two ways:  (1) initially, by the number of transportation employees that have been trained by their companies or agenciesas a result of the proposed workshop and the best practices; and (2) tracking the instances of where victims have been identified and rescued as a result of a positive identification and reporting by a transportation operator, employee, or passenger.

Beneficiaries: The primary project participants are transportation policymakers employed by Transport Ministries, transport operators, and members of the law enforcement community who enforce counter-trafficking rules. These participants should have experience addressing counter-trafficking training and awareness campaigns, and/or should regularly interface with transport operators (including bus, road freight, passenger rail, maritime, transit, trucking, or aviation sectors).  They should be of an appropriate level to be able to develop and implement policies and public campaigns on behalf of their organization.  These stakeholders can use the primary deliverables of this project, including the Baseline Desktop Report, workshop, and the best practices to develop and implement economy-level counter-trafficking programs that specifically address the factors that contribute to human trafficking and the transport sector’s role in this illicit practice. 

All three groups benefit in different ways, but each has a critical role to play in recognizing transportation’s role in facilitating human trafficking and mitigating it through awareness education and adequate follow through.  For example, Transport Ministries (and government agencies that supervise transportation operators) should develop policies encouraging transportation operators to recognize their systems’ vulnerabilities for facilitating trafficking.  The operators (in the form of agencies or companies, such as a rail company or airline) should be aware of the risk of trafficking victims, and educate their employees on the signs of potential trafficking and how to property report it.  The law enforcement agencies should be trained on how to collect the reports of suspected cases and follow through on those to investigate potential cases.  All three groups rely on each other to be able to implement effective anti-human trafficking policies and programs. 

Given that a majority of the victims of human trafficking within the APEC region are women and girls, typically from lower-income areas, this project will place particular emphasis on engaging civil society groups that focus on women’s participation and inclusion in the economy to amplify the importance of counter-trafficking efforts.  This project will also collaborate with counter-trafficking institutions working directly with human trafficking survivors to ensure that the Baseline Desktop Report and best practices are survivor-informed. 

Because human trafficking is often a part of larger criminal and illicit enterprise, the deliverables from this project will also be shared with the Counter Terrorism Working Group (with respect to the training and best practices developed to inform transportation employees and transportation users about human trafficking and how to identify it) as well as the Travel and Tourism Working Group (with respect to this working group’s interface with transportation companies). 

The general public in participating APEC economies will also benefit through their economy’s creation of awareness campaigns that will give them tools to identify and report suspected cases of human trafficking. 

Trafficking victims will benefit through an anticipated increase in reporting as awareness is raised regarding human trafficking among transportation employees and the general public.

Dissemination

The best practices developed during the workshop and revised in conjunction with the workshop participants will subsequently be widely shared with the TPT-WG member economies and potentially be used as the basis for subsequent project proposals focusing on future implementation work.  The best practices will be reported to the next Transportation Ministers Meeting in 2020 and to TPT-WG 50 in 2021.  Additionall, the Project Report, in the form of the best practices, will be published formally through APEC.  It will also be shared with NGOs, transportation industry groups, and other organizations seeking information on mitigating transportation’s role in human trafficking. 

The target audience is Transport Ministries, transport operators, and law enforcement agencies across the APEC region. 

The project implementers have no plans to sell or monetize any of the resources related to this project, including the best practices or any of the resources or training materials identified by the workshop or baseline report.

Gender

Given that a majority of the victims of human trafficking within the APEC region are women and girls, typically from lower income areas, this project will place particular emphasis on engaging civil society groups that focus on women’s participation and inclusion in the economy to amplify the importance of counter-trafficking efforts.  For example, there are several economy-level and regional NGOs from across the APEC region dedicated to reducing human trafficking’s deleterious impacts on women particularly, so these groups’ participation in the conversation as subject matter experts will be invaluable for sharing experiences and information with participants.  These organizations have their own information and training materials (the types discussed in Outcome 1) that can help economies, their transport ministries, transport operators, and law enforcement agencies reduce transportation’s role in the trafficking of women and girls. 

Additionally, this project will also set a goal to have a 50/50 gender balance at the workshop, and will use bodies like the TPTWG Women in Transportation Task Force to specifically invite female participants to join the workshop.

The project implementer is committed to collect sex-disaggregated data for all speakers and participants (and not only the APEC funded) from the project event. This data will be included as part of the submission of the Completion Report to the Secretariat when the project completes and will serve to guide future POs on their own gender parity targets.

Work Plan

TIME

TASK

DELIVERABLES

September 2019

Design survey, including specific questions needed to complete baseline desktop report that will be used to design agenda and subsequent best practices

Assemble list of potential workshop invitees

October 2019

Distribute survey to all TPT-WG member economies and follow-up as necessary to achieve a high degree of responses (>85%)

Survey for distribution to each economy

November 2019

Collect any outstanding surveys and analyze results.

Share initial findings in an interim presentation to the Intermodal and ITS Experts Group, Aviation Experts Group, and Maritime Experts Group at TPT-WG48 in Moscow, Russia

PowerPoint presentation on initial findings for delivery to TPT-WG Experts Groups

December 2019

Begin drafting of survey responses into a baseline desktop report that will identify gaps in capacity, resources, and training tools faced by responding economies

Use survey responses regarding which agencies lead counter-trafficking efforts to develop list of desired invitees to workshop

Begin distributing invitations and coordination of travel preparations for invitees

List of invitees for April/May workshop

January 2020

Continued writing of baseline desktop report identifying gaps in capacity, resources, and training tools faced by responding economies

Continued coordination of travel for invited participants

Identification of potential non-member participant invitees to attend workshop as subject matter experts (including industry stakeholders and civil society groups)

Begin development of agenda based on invitee responses

Draft agenda for April/May workshop

February 2020

Distribute Baseline Desktop Report to economies

Confirm meeting space and other logistics for holding the meeting with TPT-WG 49 hosts

Confirm consensus of TPT-WG HODs to host the workshop on the sidelines of the upcoming TPT-WG 49 meeting

Baseline Desktop Report identifying gaps in capacity, resources, and training tools

March 2020

Confirm final list of workshop participants and work with contractors and other necessary groups to ensure that travel details for all invited, funded participants are confirmed

Finalize agenda based on input from economies regarding the Baseline Desktop Report

Confirmed participant list for workshop

April 2020

Host one-day workshop on sidelines of TPT-WG 49 based on the agenda created prior to the workshop in collaboration with invitees and based on the determination of the Baseline Desktop Report

At the conclusion of workshop, develop best practices on how economies can develop and establish anti-human trafficking programs that create awareness campaigns for transport operators and the public, and also train transportation workers to identify suspected trafficking cases

Delivery of a one-day workshop

Draft best practices

April 2020

Project implementer will develop and submit a Monitoring Report per APEC Project Guidelines

APEC Monitoring Report

May 2020

Revise best practices electronically with workshop participants and then share the final version with all TPT-WG colleagues

Follow up with all economies that participated in the workshop to support development of an anti-human trafficking program in line with the best practices

Final best practices and Project Report

Economy-specific follow up

June 2020

Continue work on an economy-by-economy basis to support the development of an anti-human trafficking program in line with the best practices

Economy-specific follow up

July - August 2020

Continue work on an economy-by-economy basis to support the development of an anti-human trafficking program in line with the best practices, and confirm which economies are actively considering employee training and public awareness campaigns as a follow-up to the workshop

Economy-specific follow up

October 2020

Develop and submit final Completion report incorporating all deliverables to share with APEC Secretariat

APEC Completion Report

June 2021

Participation in the Long Term Evaluation of APEC Projects conducted by the Secretariat, as required by all APEC funded projects

Risks

The primary risks to this project consist of: 

(1) Potential non-response by economies to initial survey, which could limit the utility of the Baseline Desktop Report.  Each economy’s counter-trafficking trafficking efforts may exist within different agencies or ministries of government, meaning that TPT-WG recipients of the survey may not know which agency is responsible for leading these efforts, and might not be able to appropriately capture the scale of their economy’s efforts to mitigate this issue.  The project implementers will rely on contacts from other APEC working groups, particularly the Counter Terrorism Working Group to assist with identifying the appropriate survey recipients, as well as using locally-based U.S. colleagues (such as Embassy staff in region) to assist with the identification of appropriate Points of Contact to receive the survey.  The Project Implementer will set a 50% target response rate, anticipating that a minimum of 11 economies submit at least basic responses to the initial survey. 

a. If survey results do not meet the 11 economy threashold, project implementer will use internal resources (self-funded) to research counter trafficking efforts from APEC economies to help fill in the overall regional picture of counter trafficking efforts.  Implementers may also work with experts from regional NGOs that have subject matter expertise in this area to stand in for a lack of survey results. 

(2)  Difficulties that workshop participants and best practices recipients face in developing and implementing an counter-trafficking trafficking programs that seek to establish an effective public awareness campaign and training program for transportation employees.  Although this project does not focus on developing pilot projects for specific economies (which might be the subject of future concept notes), this project does devote three months to giving specific, case-by-case support for economies as they begin to implement the best practices.  This support work will take the form of direct, one-on-one follow up from implementer to all workshop participants checking in on their progress raising awareness within their own economy and organizations of transportation’s role in trafficking, and also on their progress establishing awareness campaigns.

Monitoring and Evaluation

Indicators will be developed to track the overall progress of the project, as well as the effectiveness of the workshop.  

To monitor the overall outcomes of the project, project implementers will look at the number of economies that respond to the initial survey as well as the number of economies that participate in the workshop and then form the best practices as key references for the overall efficiacy of the project.  The project implementer is setting a target response rate of 50%, or at least 11 economies.  (If 50% threshold is not reached, implementer will use internal resources to research anti-trafficking efforts in the APEC region to fill in gaps, as well as reach out to alternative sources, such as NGOs dealing with trafficking, to collect information.)  As mentioned above, the survey will ask questions about current economy-level programming to ascertain the extent to which economies are stuggling with human trafficking, the types of interventions that they already have in place, and any available human trafficking statistics (disaggregated by the sex of the victim).  This data will serve as a baseline for judging initiatives undertaken following the workshop and the development of best practices.  Additionally, should any ongoing initiatives not align with the best practices, another metric will be whether the economy in question adjusts their programming to align with the best practices.  At the conclusion of the project, the implementers will then work with and interview each participating economy to understand what actions their economy has started to address human trafficking, particularly along the lines of the best practices, and then collect data on how these programs are addressing human trafficking, including on the lines of gender-specific programming. 

For the workshop, project implementers will employ pre and post-workshop surveys to understand the efficiacy of the information presented and the quality of the speakers and content.  Given the critical nature of addressing the high number of women trafficked in the APEC region, project implementers will pay specific attention to having representation by civil society organizations that support women’s participation in the economy to ensure that there is a gender lens in the presentations and discussions throughout the workshop.  Project implementers also plan to invite a large proportion of women representatives to attend the workshop.

Specific metrics to be tracked will include:

·  number of participating economies in the workshop (at least 50%, or 11 economies),

·  number of participants (at least 26),

·  participation rates of female participants and speakers (at least 13 female participants, and half of the speakers, to be determined), and

.  number of economies intending to apply the best practices/implement public campains (at least 75% of participating economies).

Linkages

Given the Policy Partnership on Women and the Economy’s (PPWE) interest in improving the economic opportunity and agency for women, this project supports their goals by combating human trafficking, which inordinately affects women and girls within the APEC region.  By highlighting the importance that women’s economic participationand the role that transportation plays in facilitating human trafficking, , the TPTWG can collaborate effectively with the PPWE to combat this criminal enterprise by designing a project that will address the problem through education and public awareness.

Because human trafficking is often a part of larger criminal and illicit enterprise, the deliverables from this project will also be shared with the Counter Terrorism Working Group (in respect to the training and best practices developed to inform transportation employees and transportation users about human trafficking and how to identify it), Human Resources Development Working Group (in respect to this working group’s work to enhance employability, provide quality employment, and create economic opportunity) as well as the Travel and Tourism Working Group (in respect to this working group’s interface with transportation companies). 

This program follows-up on an earlier, economy-specific APEC project, also sponsored by the U.S., that targeted three economies (Australia, Thailand, and Viet Nam) on counter-trafficking projects.  Lessons learned from that project will be integrated into the development of the Baseline Desktop Report and best practices, and economies that engaged in this project will be specifically invited to share their experiences and lessons learned from their earlier project at the proposed workshop. 

APEC is an ideal source of funding and support for this project because an inordinate number of women in the APEC region are affected and victimized by illicit human trafficking. Funding through the ASF’s Women in the Economy Sub-fund will enable the project implementers to invite practitioners from across the APEC region, enriching the workshop with a wider set of perspectives and experiences fighting human trafficking, while ensuring that developing economies suffering the most are able to participate in workshop discussions and the best practices.

Sustainability

Although this project does not focus on developing pilot projects for specific economies (which might be the subject of future concept notes), this project devotes three months to giving specific, case-by-case support for economies as they begin to implement the best practices following the workshop, including sharing U.S. lessons learned and suggestions for success in developing and launching economy-level programming. 

As part of the final report prepared in July 2020, the project implementers will give a readout on the steps each economy has undertaken to start developing their economy’s counter-trafficking programs.  The U.S. will also ask engaged economies to share periodic updates on their economy’s programming at subsequent TPTWG meetings.  Additionally, U.S. DOT intends to follow up with a Concept Note that targets developing economies that are struggling with high rates of women being trafficked, and then support the development of pilot programs based on the best practices above and beyond the work they complete following the workshop. 

Project implementers will be coordinating with each economy that participates in the workshop, and other economies based on interest, to support their development of programming that supports the two key outcomes in section 5.  For the three months following the delivery of the workshop, project implementers will be regularly checking in by email and telephone to ensure that economies have guidance and support in designing effective public awareness campaigns and training programs for transportation workers based on publicly available resources.

Project Overseers

The U.S. TPT-WG Head of Delegation, Mr. Jason Hill, will serve as the primary project overseer.  He will work closely with the U.S. Department of Transportation’s (U.S. DOT) staff-level lead on the Department’s counter-trafficking program, Ms. Nicole Bambas, and her team, including Ms. Maha Alkhateeb, to coordinate the delivery of this project. 

Together, the U.S. DOT will coordinate and administer the program, using contract staff to supplement work such as the administration of the survey, drafting related reports, and leading the developing of the workshop. 

Logistical details surrounding the workshop hosting will be handled by the U.S. delegation, which will also be hosting the TPT-WG 49.

Cost Efficiency

Not Applicable.

Drawdown Timetable

Not Applicable.

Direct Labour

Not Applicable.

Waivers

Not Applicable.

Are there any supporting document attached?

No 
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Project No.

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Project Status

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Project Year

Project Session

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Co-funding Amount

Total Project Value

Sponsoring Forum

Topics

Committee

Other Fora Involved

Other Non-APEC Stakeholders Involved

Proposing Economy(ies)

Co-Sponsoring Economies

Expected Start Date

Expected Completion Date

Project Proponent Name 1

Job Title 1

Organization 1

Postal Address 1

Telephone 1

Fax 1

Email 1

Project Proponent Name 2

Job Title 2

Organization 2

Postal Address 2

Telephone 2

Fax 2

Email 2

Declaration

Project Summary

Relevance

Objectives

Alignment

TILF/ASF Justification

Beneficiaries and Outputs

Dissemination

Gender

Work Plan

Risks

Monitoring and Evaluation

Linkages

Sustainability

Project Overseers

Cost Efficiency

Drawdown Timetable

Direct Labour

Waivers

Are there any supporting document attached?

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Reprogramming Notes

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PD Sign Off

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