Project Title

APEC Best Practice Guidelines for Establishing and Enhancing Energy Efficiency Incentive (EEI) Schemes 

Project Year

2018   

Project Number

EWG 09 2018A 

Project Session

Session 2   

Project Type

Standard 

Project Status

Project in Implementation   
View Budget TableView Budget Table
|
PrintPrint

Project No.

EWG 09 2018A 

Project Title

APEC Best Practice Guidelines for Establishing and Enhancing Energy Efficiency Incentive (EEI) Schemes 

Project Status

Project in Implementation 

Publication (if any)

 

Fund Account

APEC Support Fund 

Sub-fund

ASF: Energy Efficiency 

Project Year

2018 

Project Session

Session 2 

APEC Funding

100,000 

Co-funding Amount

55,425 

Total Project Value

155,425 

Sponsoring Forum

Energy Working Group (EWG) 

Topics

Energy 

Committee

SOM Steering Committee on Economic and Technical Cooperation (SCE) 

Other Fora Involved

 

Other Non-APEC Stakeholders Involved

 

Proposing Economy(ies)

Australia 

Co-Sponsoring Economies

Chile; China; Hong Kong, China; Japan; Russia; Singapore; United States 

Expected Start Date

30/09/2018 

Expected Completion Date

30/12/2019 

Project Proponent Name 1

Keith Tarlo 

Job Title 1

Principal Policy Officer 

Organization 1

NSW Office of Environment and Heritage 

Postal Address 1

PO Box A290 Sydney South West NSW 1232, Australia 

Telephone 1

(61-2) 99956316 

Fax 1

Not Applicable 

Email 1

Keith.Tarlo@environment.nsw.gov.au; michaelh.smith@act.gov.au 

Project Proponent Name 2

Not Applicable 

Job Title 2

Not Applicable 

Organization 2

Not Applicable 

Postal Address 2

Not Applicable 

Telephone 2

Not Applicable 

Fax 2

Not Applicable 

Email 2

Not Applicable 

Declaration

Keith Tarlo 

Project Summary

This capacity building project will provide APEC energy efficiency policy practitioners with practical information on how to design, establish and operate new energy efficiency Incentive (EEI) schemes as well as enhance existing EEI schemes, relevant for government priorities and policy objectives. EEIs are proven policy mechanisms that drive large reductions in energy intensity by harnessing market innovation, competition and delivery of lowest cost energy saving goods and services. EEIs involve two main elements: (i) a target and commitment/Incentive to procure savings, and (ii) a set of methodologies to quantify and verify the amount of savings delivered across a range of activities and sectors. Currently, EEI schemes have been established in more than 50 jurisdictions, including in the USA, Canada, Republic of Korea, Europe and four sub-jurisdictional schemes in Australia, yet few currently exist in the Asia-Pacific. There is an opportunity amongst the many APEC members in sharing the lessons of international best practice to guide the potential design and creation of new EEI schemes. This project will also help enhance existing EEI schemes in multiple ways and thus provide benefits also to those jurisdictions which already have EEI schemes. 

The project has three major deliverables:

1) a "how to" handbook on how to establish EEI schemes based on learnings gained from existing successful EEI schemes.

2) 2 X workshop for energy efficiency policy practitioners in Asia in conjunction with a relevant APEC EWG’s Energy Efficiency Working Group meetings and 1 X workshop in conjunction with the Australian EEI scheme cross-jurisdictional meetings or COAG NEPP meetings; and

3) Project outputs and other relevant resources relevant to establishing and running EEO schemes collated for inclusion on an appropriate APEC EWG project webpage. Targeted end user consultation with energy efficiency policy officers will be undertaken at the start of the project to ensure deliverables meet the needs of APEC members.

Relevance

Relevance – Region: The APEC Economic Leaders’ Meeting in Honolulu in 2011 set a goal to reduce the aggregate energy intensity of APEC economies by 45% by 2035.  Identifying effective methods to achieve this goal is an important APEC priority.  Energy efficiency Incentives (EEIs) are one particularly effective method.  EEIs reduce energy intensity by improving energy efficiency in the residential, commercial, SME and industrial sectors.  EEI schemes are a proven energy efficiency policy approach having been established at economy-wide or sub-economy level in more than 50 jurisdictions to date in Europe, and in five APEC members: Canada, China, Republic of Korea, the United States and 4 at the sub-jurisdictional level in Australia.  They vary in coverage and design detail, to reflect local circumstances.  EEI schemes are proving successful in reducing the energy intensity of many economies A recent research paper analysed the different EEI schemes implemented in the European Union, the United States and Australia, and found that the EEI schemes are successful in all regions, saving a substantial amount of energy cost-effectively (see Table 1 below). 

Table 1: Energy Savings Achieved by Selected European EEI Schemes

Time period

Final Energy Savings per Year (ktoe)

Sector

United Kingdom

2008-2012

237

Household sector

Denmark

2015

291

All sectors excluding transport

France

2011-2013

377

All sectors

Italy

2015

500

All sectors

Source: Nadel, Cowart, Crossley and Rosenow (2017[1])

In the design and legislation of EEI schemes, energy efficiency policy makers set annual energy saving and/or greenhouse saving targets which have to be met by energy retailers/utilities. Therefore EEI schemes are also useful for governments enabling them to set and “lock in” a definite amount of energy efficiency savings per annum. This can help APEC members commit to and achieve milestones in energy intensity reduction targets from 2018 to 2035.

This project will provide energy efficiency policy practitioners from all APEC economies with practical information on how they could benefit from establishing new EEI schemes and why they should enhance existing EEI schemes. Targeted end user consultation with energy efficiency policy officers will be undertaken at the start of the project to ensure the three project deliverables meet the needs of energy efficiency policy officers interested in this project. The project workshops will provide opportunities for face-to-face engagement and help build an ongoing network of APEC energy efficiency policy practitioners working on or interested in energy efficiency Incentive schemes. The project deliverables and project web site will ensure sustained benefits for all APEC economies, whether with or without current EEI schemes. This project focusses directly on activities that will contribute to achieving APEC's aggregate energy intensity reduction goal.  Since EEI schemes typically focus on energy efficiency measures in the residential, commercial, SME and/or industrial sectors, they offer a useful mechanism to achieve urban emission reduction, as promoted by the APEC Low Carbon Model Towns (LCMT) program, led by Japan, and the activities of the APEC Sustainable Energy Center (APSEC) in Tianjin, China.  EEI schemes have great potential to significantly increase investment in energy efficiency in the many APEC members that currently do not have them,and enhancing existing EEI schemes will make them still more effective to help achieve the 45% energy intensity reduction APEC target. 

Relevance – Eligibility: This project focusses directly on activities that will contribute to achieving APEC's aggregate energy intensity reduction goal.  Since EEI schemes typically focus on energy efficiency measures in the residential, commercial, SME and/or industrial sectors, they offer a useful mechanism to achieve urban emission reduction, as promoted by the APEC Low Carbon Model Towns (LCMT) program, led by Japan, and the activities of the APEC Sustainable Energy Center (APSEC) in Tianjin, China.  EEI schemes have great potential to significantly increase investment in energy efficiency in the many APEC members that currently do not have them,and enhancing existing EEI schemes will make them still more effective to help achieve the 45% energy intensity reduction APEC target. 

Relevance – Capacity Building: This capacity building project will enable APEC member economies to obtain, share, strengthen, maintain and develop knowledge, abilities, skills and technical know-how to design and implement effective new EEI schemes, improve the performance of existing schemes and help adapt EEI Schemes to each economy’s unique circumstances and operating environments.  The project will collate and assess the learnings gained from EEI schemes implemented in both APEC and non-APEC economies.  These learnings will be effectively communicated to energy efficiency policy practitioners from all APEC economies through a “how to” handbook, workshops and an appropriate existing APEC website.  This information sharing will enable APEC members to explore establishing new EEI schemes and improve the performance of existing schemes. Key EEI scheme design options and steps to develop new EEI schemes will be explained clearly in detail to empower APEC members to develop EEI schemes with confidence. This aspect of the project’s outputs will also address the EEI scheme design questions relevant for whenever existing EEI schemes undergo a formal review and renewal process. This often happens every 5 years. The project’s outputs will also address key issues relevant for both APEC members seeking to design new schemes or to enhance existing schemes such as: 

-  What are the major energy efficiency technology market transformation opportunities?

-  How can EEI schemes best help to reduce electricity demand growth to reduce electricity supply infrastructure costs and put downward pressure on electricity prices?

-  What are the barriers to development of EEI Schemes in developing member economies, and how can these be overcome?

- How can EEI schemes be designed to better assist achieve policy priorities such as reducing energy poverty, helping low income households, improving industry competitiveness and reducing greenhouse gas emissions?


[1] Nadel, S., Cowart, R., Crossley, D. and Rosenow, J. (2017).  Energy saving obligations across three continents: Contrasting approaches and results.  Proceedings of the ECEEE 2017 Summer Study “Consumption, Efficiency and Limits”.  Toulon/Hyères, France, ECEEE, pp 295–308.  Download 

Objectives

This project will enable and support participating APEC energy efficiency policy practitioners:

·  To design new and enhance existing energy efficiency obligation schemes in their economies; and

·  Create a lasting online project resource to help energy efficiency makers over the long term.

Alignment

Alignment - APEC:  The project will directly contribute to achieving the APEC goal to reduce the aggregate energy intensity of APEC economies by 45% by 2035 as well as economy-wide energy efficiency or energy productivity targets.  The project is also aligned with the second theme in the APEC Mission- ‘strengthening quality growth’ and specifically with the topic within this theme ‘sustainable growth’. 

Alignment – Forum: The project is closely aligned with the Strategic Plan of the APEC Energy Working Group ‘to build the capacity of APEC members to strengthen domestic and regional energy security and lower the carbon intensity of energy supply and use across the region, facilitated by information and data exchanges, joint research and development, and open trade and investment’

TILF/ASF Justification

Not Applicable.

Beneficiaries and Outputs

Outputs: The project has three major deliverables: 

1) Best Practice Handbook on how to Create and Enhance Existing Energy Efficiency Incentive Schemes: This will be a 100-150 page handbook provided in English and published online as an APEC Publication. This will be based on learnings gained from existing successful EEI schemes, particularly in developing economies (where they exist), and informed by issues raised during APEC members during the initial project consultation (e.g. how should an energy savings target be set?). This will include best practices and an overarching framework on how to set up and run EEI schemes, and how to review and improve existing schemes. A minimum of 3 successful EEI schemes will be included in the handbook’ as case studies. This will equip policy officers with the necessary skills to confidently know how to:

·  develop business cases for creating new EEI schemes within their relevant jurisdictions;

·  design the overarching architecture of an energy efficiency scheme that suits the relevant operating environment of that economy;

·  design specific scheme elements such as scheme metrics (i.e. energy, carbon, energy bill saving or hybrid metrics, scheme targets) to best achieve domestic policy goals;

·  choose and develop a suite of EEI scheme eligible energy efficiency saving activities, and

·  periodically review and enhance existing EEI schemes.

2) Energy Efficiency Incentive Workshops: Two workshops in total, consisting of:

a) One workshop for energy efficiency policy practitioners in Asia, in conjunction with the APEC Expert Group on Energy Efficiency and Conservation (EGEEC) meeting,. This workshop will provided face to face training based on the “Best Practice Handbook” (Output #1) covering all the key issues, topics and knowledge needed to empower energy policy officers from APEC members to create EEI schemes and then be able to review and further improve EEI schemes. The aim of the project is to capacity build leading energy efficiency policy practitioners so aligning this workshop with the EGEEC meeting will help ensure as many eminent policy officers can attend as possible. The issues covered in the workshop will discuss:

·  the economic case for creating new EEI schemes and how they complement existing energy efficiency policies;

·  how best to design key EEI scheme design options; and

·  the key steps to develop new EEI schemes and where existing examples of legislation can be drawn on.

The workshop will also cover:

·   What are the major energy efficiency technology market transformation opportunities, and how can EEI Schemes help provide market pull for such technologies;

·   What are the barriers to development of EEI Schemes in developing member economies, and how can these be overcome?; and

·   How can EEI schemes be designed to better assist achieve policy priorities such as reducing energy poverty, improving industry competitiveness and reducing greenhouse gas emissions?

b) The 2nd Workshop: A 2nd workshop will be held in conjunction with both:

i) the annual meeting of Australia EEI scheme policy officers; and

ii) the Energy Efficiency Expo trade event (https://www.energyefficiencyexpo.com.au/en-gb.html)  being held in Melbourne, Australia from October 22-24th 2019 run by the Energy Efficiency Council. This 2nd workshop will be run over 2 days with the first day covering training on how best to design, create, legislate and run new EEI Schemes and the the second day covering how to review and enhance existing EEI Schemes. At this two day workshop, APEC member representatives will benefit from training by the consultants and from hearing presentations by a selection of EEI Scheme reps from the existing Australian EEI Schemes. This will enrich the training. This two day workshop will run in parallel to the Energy Efficiency Expo. (NB Please note that this Energy Efficiency Trade Expo is a domestic trade event as can be seen on its web site (https://www.energyefficiencyexpo.com.au/en-gb.html) not an international trade event.)

APEC member energy efficiency policy representatives from travel-eligible economies of APEC’ will be offered to fly out to this event for this workshop and trade event. APEC member policy officers not from travel eligible economies of APEC will also be invited. This will allow APEC member representatives to receive further workshop training, learn from leading EEI scheme policy officers in Australia about their experiences setting up, running, reviewing and improving EEI schemes. This will also enable APEC member representatives to meet the energy efficiency service companies which operate in the 4 X Australian EEI schemes. The benefit here of holding this workshop in Australia is that APEC member energy efficiency policy officers can build relationships with and receive ongoing mentoring from the over 60 Australian energy efficiency policy officers who currently work on EEI schemes. Also APEC member representatives can meet face to face current energy service companies experienced in delivering energy efficiency upgrades as part of these schemes, ask them questions, and potentially lead to further knowledge sharing, collaboration and trade with APEC members.

The two workshops will allow sharing of knowledge and the opportunity to collaborate with energy efficiency practitioners across APEC member economies. It will also allow the project team to survey practitioners to understand policy scenarios across participating economies, barriers to uptake and to assist them through specific policy issues. 

3)  Publication of supporting resources for EEI Schemes: The 100-150 page best practice handbook will be made available as an APEC publication in accordance with APEC Publication guidelines on the APEC website, the APEC Energy Working Group site, and the APEC Energy Smart Communities Initiative – Knowledge Sharing Platform (ESCI-KSP) page. All project outputs (The Best Practice Handbook, Workshop Presentations, Survey results and Key inputs) will also be made available as an APEC project report to be published on the APEC Publications Database This project will also explore other possible sites for inclusion, like the International Energy Agency webpage (IEA). Targeted end user consultation with energy efficiency policy officers will be undertaken at the start of the project to ensure deliverables meet the needs of APEC members. This will involve energy efficiency policy officers either choosing to fill out an online survey, or a phone survey to make sure the project consultants capture what each APEC member is looking for from this project.

Outcomes: 

Participants apply knowledge of EEI schemes and policy to their roles: Participants will have a greater understanding of energy efficiency policy and how EEI schemes can be used to achieve government objectives. This knowledge will be disseminated through these participating organisations and will also have the tools to review and improve EEI schemes (where they exist). The workshops will also create a network of contacts to other energy efficiency policy makers and experts, where participants can share challenges and learnings, and stay across latest developments in utilizing and improving EEI schemes and other energy efficiency technology opportunities. 

Resources used as a basis for policy recommendations and conducting stakeholder reviews: Key EEI scheme design options and steps to develop new EEI schemes will be explained clearly in detail to empower APEC members to develop business cases to propose new EEI schemes with confidence. Key learnings from APEC and non-APEC member economies with existing EEI schemes will ensure resources create a strong and robust platform for promoting them as viable tools to meet government objectives. Tools to conduct stakeholder reviews will ensure that development of any EEI Scheme will take into account any complexities in that economy’s operating environment. 

Empowering members to implement policy changes: With the relevant skills and resources, and the ability to link the advantages of EEI Schemes to government policies, APEC members will be able to implement EEI Schemes within their economies. The key benefits of EEI schemes to APEC economies are that they reduce energy poverty, help low income households, improve industry energy productivity and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. In turn, this will also support reducing peak electricity demand and demand for new electricity supply infrastructure required over the longer-term. Over time, the benefits of policies that support EEI Schemes will be enjoyed by the large majority of the population where they’ve been implemented. 

Beneficiaries:

1)
Direct Beneficiaries: 

a) Government organisations: The main beneficiaries will be energy efficiency policy makers at both the economy and sub-jurisdictional levels of government from all participating economies. Project workshop participants will be selected on the basis of their roles as active and influential energy efficiency policy practitioners in their respective APEC economies, and will use the project outputs to further develop energy efficiency policy and provide business cases for EEI Schemes and the direct benefits it can add to their economy. These resources will also be used by these practitioners to share learnings with other related government industries and policy makers alike. Outputs will also create a network of energy efficiency policy makers and experts across multiple jurisdictions to provide ongoing engagement, collaboration and experience sharing. 

b) Indirect Beneficiaries 

i) Utilities: Utilities benefit from EEI Schemes as these Schemes reduce the cost of, and the need for, additional energy generation, transmission and distribution infrastructure. This reduces the pressure and the cost of replacement infrastructure, and delay having to build additional capacity into the network. EEI Schemes also assist in reducing energy consumption during peak demand events, ensuring reliability of supply.

ii) Energy Efficiency Industry: The work completed on establishing and implementing EEI Schemes will provide an overview for businesses that specialize in energy efficiency as to how they can enter the market and participate in these Schemes, ensuring long-term success of these government policies. This will also create opportunities for businesses working in related fields to develop new business models focused on reducing energy consumption. The 2015 Review of the Energy Savings Scheme in New South Wales (Australia) found that benefits also include job creation, attracting more investment, improving local economies and stimulating business innovation. These benefits have also been reported in reviews of various other EEI Schemes. 

iii) Businesses and Households: The benefits of EEI schemes are shared across households and businesses, resulting in energy (and bill) savings for occupants and businesses alike. This reduces bill stress on households, and allows businesses to become more competitive. The delayed expansion of distribution networks by Electricity Retailers/Suppliers also reduces the rate of electricity bill increases. Finally, all citizens and the environment benefits from EEI schemes, as a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions from the electricity sector improves air quality and environmental resilience.

iv) Research institutions: The outputs of these projects can be utilized by both policy-specific institutions, and as a resource by universities that offer energy-related courses and qualifications. This will give greater insight into how Governments use market instruments/mechanisms to drive policy outcomes.

Dissemination

Target audience: The target audience for this project are energy efficiency policy makers, from both economy and sub-jurisdictional levels of Government, across various APEC members. Other stakeholders will include energy efficiency incentive scheme experts, energy efficiency product and service providers and companies that have business models set up around energy efficiency. 

Dissemination of project outputs: The following steps highlight how project outputs will be made available and used by other relevant stakeholders, to ensure benefits of this project extend further than those that are directly engaged in the consultation and workshops.

·  For publication on APEC website: the Best Practice Handbook

For the relevant Fora website and in the APEC Project Database: other project outputs not suitable for inclusion in the published Best Practice Handbook (such as workshop presentations, survey results and key inputs) 

·   Workshops: There will be two workshops held as part of this project. One of the key steps in future planning during the workshop will be for participants to develop action plans, to engage them on what steps will need to take place, and who they will need to disseminate this information to. 

·   Online Publication via websites: The 100-150 page best practice handbook will be made available as an APEC publication in accordance with APEC Publication guidelines on the APEC website, the APEC Energy Working Group site, and the APEC Energy Smart Communities Initiative – Knowledge Sharing Platform (ESCI-KSP) page. All project outputs (The Best Practice Handbook, Workshop Presentations, Survey results and Key inputs) will be made available on the relevant Fora website and in the APEC Project Database.. This will allow all APEC member economies access to the project outputs, and resources used during workshops so that workshops can be re-created for other government policymakers in various jurisdictions. 

·   Network of Energy Efficiency Policymakers: The workshops will create networks of energy efficiency policy makers across APEC economies, and will foster collaboration, information sharing and exchanging of experiences post project. A cross-jurisdictional network of representatives from the 4 EEI schemes in Australia has been created that will act as a secretariat for this network and support and knowledge share with other policy officers via an email network.

Gender

The project will ensure that, at our workshops, the nomination of female speakers and participants are strongly encouraged. The project is targeting at least 20% of speakers are female, and that at least 30% of participants are females. PO is committed to collect gender disaggregated data for all speakers and participants (not only the APEC funded) at the project event. This data will be included when submitting a Completion Report to the Secretariat at the completion of the project, achieved as well as giving future POs guidance on their own gender parity targets. 

The project will also arrange a speaker to talk substantively on the issue of gender and energy efficiency during the workshops. 

Finally, there will be a substantive analysis of gender in energy efficiency across all project outputs.

Work Plan

Date

Task

Deliverables

Nov-Dec 2018

Project Commencement

Writing of Request for Quote

Engagement of steering committee

Engagement of APEC EWG

Steering committee created

Terms of Reference drafted

Nov 2018-Jan 2019

Writing and issuing of Request for Quote

Run tender process and select successful consortia.

Jan 2019 – Feb 2019

Preferred contractors recommended to APEC Secretariat

Steering committee meetings

Targeted end-user consultation with policymakers from APEC member economies

Invitations to APEC member energy efficiency reps to attend the workshops.

Detailed project management

Fortnightly check-in meetings

Terms of Reference finalized and approved

Contractors engaged.

Compile list of APEC member energy efficiency reps with APEC secretariat

Undertake online survey to invite their views to help ensure all their needs are addressed in the project’s Best Practice Handbook.

Invite APEC member energy efficiency policy representatives to the project workshops to ensure plenty of time for them to gain approvals and organize travel.

March-April 2019

Completion of initial research and review

Initial selection and communications to potential participants for workshop 1

Pre-event engagement for workshop 1

Planning of event logistics for workshop 1

First draft of EEI handbook – “International Best Practice Guidelines – Part A - How to Design and Create new EEI schemes” completed and submitted to APEC for review.

First version of the Best Practice Handbook – Part A shared with EGEEC policy officers inviting feedback.

Feedback on EEI resources collected

April-May 2019

Detailed project management

Fortnightly check-in meetings

First version of Best Practice Handbook – Part A shared with expert network of energy efficiency policy officers inviting feedback.

Feedback on EEI resources collected

June 2019

Detailed project management

Fortnightly check-in meetings

First version of the First draft of EEI handbook – “International Best Practice Guidelines – Part B - How to Review and Enhance Existing EEI schemes” completed

Feedback on EEI handbook Part A received

June– August 2019

Hosting the First Project Workshop

Detailed project management

Fortnightly check-in meetings

First Project workshop held in conjunction with an APEC Expert Group on Energy Efficiency and Conservation meeting

Revised version of EEI handbook provided

APEC Monitoring Report

August  2019

Incorporating feedback from the 1st workshop to revise the project outputs – eg: Best Practice Handbook, workshop powerpoints.

Detailed project management

Fortnightly check-in meetings

Revised version of EEI resources provided

July 2019 –

Sept 2019

Initial selection and communications to potential participants for workshop 2

Pre-event engagement for workshop 2

Planning of event logistics for workshop 2

Sept – Oct 2019

Final drafts of all project deliverables to be refined based on workshops to further ensure they meet the needs of the target audience.

Final EEI Handbook

Final EEI Resources

Evaluation survey report

October 2019

Second Workshop and Trade event

Second Project workshop and trade event in partnership with Australia’s Energy Efficiency Council’s Energy Efficiency Trade Expo (Oct 2019)..This will include a specific trade event organised by the Australian Energy Savers Industry Association (peak industry body for Australian energy efficiency service companies which deliver all the energy efficiency upgrades for the Australian EEI schemes. The workshop will align with the meeting of energy efficiency policy officers from the 4 Australian EEI schemes.

Nov 2019

Project conclusion with finalized project outputs added to the project website.

Project conclusion with all project outputs (final versions) added to relevant websites (see dissemination section).

Publication of EEI Handbook

Feb 2020

APEC Project Completion Report Drafted

Submit APEC Project Completion Report to APEC EWG

July – Dec 2020

Project Evaluation

Participation in the Long Term Evaluation of APEC Projects conducted by the Secretariat.

Risks

Lack of sufficient attendees from APEC developing economies for the projects two workshops:

We still start on this as soon as the project starts to ensure this is organized and planned well in advance of the workshops. We will leverage our international networks (eg IEA, IPEEC) to identify the appropriate participants and speakers to both workshop events We expect to be able to have more than the required number of participants. We will choose attendees based on their capacity to contribute to achieve the objectives of the project. 

Lack of interest from Governments in using the project outputs to implement Energy Efficiency Incentive Schemes in participating member economies: The successful consortia of consultants will build on the fact that 7 APEC members have co-sponsored this Concept Note and ensure they and other leading energy efficiency policy makers are engaged from the start by inviting their input into the project. A questionnaire survey will be sent inviting the target audience to provide feedback on what would be most helpful for them to meet their needs?  This pre-workshops and pre-handbook survey will identify members from participating APEC member economies that are most active in the energy efficiency policy space, and will use their perspectives to shape the deliverables and ensure they address the concerns of the APEC members. Consultation will begin early in the project and will engage both supportive and oppositional stakeholders, to ensure deliverables are as robust as possible. Consistent and frequent feedback will be solicited by participants to capture advice and concerns, and that the deliverables continue to meet the needs of members’ policy directives. The project will also create networks of cross-jurisdictional energy efficiency experts and give members support channels when faced with challenging scenarios after the project has concluded. 

Stakeholder pushback in participating member economies: There may be pushback from some stakeholders in different economies due to concern about the possible burdens of an Energy Efficiency Incentive Scheme. A stakeholder analysis will be conducted early in the project to assess the risk of stakeholder pushback and identify appropriate solutions for engaging them. 

Contractor/s do not have adequate knowledge of Energy Efficiency Incentive Schemes: The Request for Proposal (RFP) will include an exhaustive list of requirements to ensure strong candidates are selected to complete this project. An inter-jurisdictional panel of Australian Schemes will also be created to ensure feedback is captured from other States and can assess potential candidates on a plethora of different attributes. 

Project delays: The risk of project delays will be minimized by fortnightly progress meetings, allowing early indications of project delays and time to rectify. There will be allotted time within the workplan in case potential issues arise to ensure there is time to address concerns before affecting project deliverables. The Terms of Reference will clearly state if there are delays (such as disagreement between different stakeholders) how this is to be resolved and the project progressed. Finally, frequent consultation with all stakeholders will provide opportunities to identify project delays and put in place strategies to address them. 

Duplication of work already completed/published: There has been previously no Asia Pacific focused energy policy maker capacity building project, like this one, to assist APEC members design, create and legislate new EEI schemes.  This project builds upon the IEA’s (2012) Best Practices in Designing and Implementing Energy Efficiency Incentive Schemes guide. This previous IEA report was solely focused on how EEI Schemes can be used by OECD economies. It did not address the question of how EEI schemes can best be designed to assist developing and emerging economies? This 2012 IEA report is also now significantly out of date. Much has been learnt over the last 6 years of international EEI scheme experience. This project and its outputs aims to create new up to date user friendly capacity building resources still more relevant for all APEC members including emerging and developing economies.

Monitoring and Evaluation

Monitoring and evaluation forms an integral part of this project and will be implemented by the PO from project inception. Regular communication channels between the PO, the contracting entity delivering the project, the APEC participants and the APEC Secretariat will be established at the beginning of the project, offering a continuous feedback loop from multiple sources. 

Monitoring: In order to ensure the project is on track to meet its objectives, the following methods will be used throughout the project’s duration (please see workplan for relevant deliverables):

·  Fortnightly check-in meetings: The PO will meet weekly with the contracting entity to understand completion of key tasks and deliverables, to remain informed of any changes and to provide any updates/further information from the APEC secretariat, the EWG and participants.

·   Initial Survey of APEC participants: Initial meetings and surveys of APEC participants will ensure that deliverables are shaped to specific policy needs and address the barriers faced by policy makers in implementing energy efficiency initiatives.

·  Initial circulation of draft resources: A first version of resources will be circulated before being finalized, so that there is an opportunity to address any concerns that participants, the PO, steering committee or APEC Secretariat and the EWG/EGEEC may have, before a revised version of resources is published.

·  APEC Monitoring Report: The monitoring report (due in April 2019) will also be used to communicate to the APEC Secretariat (and EWG) progress against objectives, timeframes and deliverables.

Evaluation: From an evaluation perspective, the project will be considered successful if participants can demonstrate knowledge of EEI Schemes, their benefits and have the appropriate tools and mechanisms to provide a business case for establishing an EEI Scheme, and make recommendations to implement them, in their home economy. To quantify this, the following methods will be used to collect data, specifically looking for the indicators listed below:

·  Engagement from participants at workshops: The contractors delivering the workshops will provide written feedback on engagement from participants during the workshop, highlighting strengths of the workshop and highlighting any areas they have for further development.

·  Evaluation survey: Post-workshop surveys will quantify how well the workshop itself and the resources provided meets the needs of individual member economies and their policy frameworks.

·  APEC Completion Report: The completion report post-project will also be used to determine whether the project was effective in meeting its objectives.

Indicators: The following indicators will be used to determine whether the project was successful:

·   Alignment of resources and workshop to specific government policy needs, via stakeholder feedback and the evaluation survey

·   Participation from at least 10 different APEC member economies

·   Gender inclusion targets (see Q8 above for more detail)

Linkages

Consultations with APEC and non-APEC stakeholders during the development of the project handbook, 2 X workshops, and the project web resources will provide mechanisms for enabling collaboration with, and broad input from, APEC and non-APEC stakeholders. Consultations will be held with relevant non-governmental organisations (NGOs), academics, and economy-level policymakers. This will also help in creating resources for policymakers about building a groundswell of support and partnerships with NGOs and the private sector. The project has deliberately included two workshops to ensure adequate face to face stakeholder engagement as well. This project also compliments other energy efficiency policy work by many APEC members to improve energy efficiency building and appliance standards. This project builds upon the IEA’s (2012) Best Practices in Designing and Implementing Energy Efficiency Incentive Scheme’s guide. This previous IEA report was solely focused on how EEI Schemes can be used by OECD economies. It did not address the question of how EEI schemes can best be designed to assist developing and emerging economies? This 2012 IEA report is also now significantly out of date. Much has been learnt over the last 6 years of international EEI scheme experience. This project and its outputs aims to create new up to date user friendly capacity building resources still more relevant for all economies, including emerging and developing economies.

The IEA has shown that there is a large global energy efficiency investment gap that, unless addressed, makes it not possible to achieve the Paris Climate Change Agreement. This project and its outputs addresses this directly. This project will also link to previous APEC work on energy efficiency policies including EWG10 2016A which produced the ‘Compendium of Energy Efficiency Policies in APEC Economies’.

·  APEC’s comparative advantage: Why is APEC the best sources of funds for this project?

APEC EWG is the best source of funds for this project because:

·  EEI schemes are now well established in Europe, North America and Australia but not established in many other APEC member economies. Hence there is a need for this project to enable APEC members, like Australia, share international best practice knowledge of how to design, create and legislate new EEI schemes to help achieve the APEC 2035 energy intensity reduction target.

·  There has been previously no Asia Pacific focused energy policy maker capacity building project to assist APEC members design, create and legislate new EEI schemes.

·  APEC EWG has unique convening capability to bring together relevant energy efficiency policy makers for a capacity building project such as this.  This project has potential to lead to the creation of new EEI schemes amongst APEC members that will result in greater investment and trade in energy efficiency services and enabling technologies.

Sustainability

To provide ongoing certainty that project deliverables are used post-project, the following steps have been put in place: 

Adoption of best-practice guides and resources: Not only will the EEI Guidebook and resources follow best-practice and offer pathways for navigating common policy issues when setting up EEI schemes, all project resources (such as presentations, survey results and key inputs) will be available and disseminated through a sub-page on the APEC EWG site. This gives all APEC economies the option of using these resources and re-creating workshops and engagement activities on an as-needs basis. This will sustain knowledge sharing, and that key findings and recommendations are transferred as a resource to all energy efficiency policy makers in their home economies. 

Network of Energy Efficiency experts: This project will create a network of EEI Scheme experts and energy efficiency policymakers across the APEC region. Contractors engaged to complete this project will include experts across multiple economies, and they will be able to draw on their experience alongside from multiple energy efficiency agencies and entities. This will equip participants with a network of contacts and resources for continued work in the energy efficiency space and will sustain capacity building and experience-sharing. The Australian EEI Schemes have an existing cross-jurisdictional EEI network that will exist long into the future. We will expand this network with interested energy efficiency policy officers in APEC members using IPEEC and IEA networks. 

Monitoring of future actions by Governments: Through the regular network of contacts set up post-workshops, the network of experts will continue to track progress with participants (through conversation and post-workshop survey) as to business cases and the progression of policy that will support EEI Schemes in participating APEC member economies. Action plans will be set up with member economies to help them identify next steps in taking learnings from the workshops and applying them to their specific political contexts, including dissemination of the workshop to other key policy makers in relevant government departments. We will send an online questionnaire – 6-12 months between June – Dec 2019, as part of the project evaluation. We will ensure that attendees are chosen based on genuine interest in moving to implement EEI schemes. Australian EEI schemes have already hosted a visit of Japanese government representatives in Australia in 2018 because the Japanese Government was keen to learn from Australian EEI schemes.

Project Overseers

Keith Tarlo is a Principal Policy Officer for Climate and Resource Efficiency Policy at the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage and will be a key contact for this project. Keith led the establishment of the NSW Energy Savings Scheme - a comprehensive market based energy efficiency target and trading scheme; he has also led the evaluation of the NSW Energy Efficiency Strategy. Keith holds a Master of Science. 

Bradford Jefferies is a Policy Officer at the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage and will be a key contact for this project. He has spent several years working on the mechanics of the NSW Energy Savings Scheme, introducing new energy efficiency activities, revising methods for calculating energy savings and investigating energy savings from behaviour changes. Bradford holds a Master of Environmental Science and is a Certified Measurement and Verification Professional.

Cost Efficiency

Not Applicable.

Drawdown Timetable

Not Applicable.

Direct Labour

The NSW Office of Environment and Heritage will select a contractor through a competitive restricted tender procurement process to deliver the outputs listed in this proposal. APEC procurement guidelines will be followed in selecting and contracting the staff. 


Key Tasks 

Key tasks and expected timeframes for each output are in the table below:

Project Outputs and tasks

Expected timeframe

Output One: EEI Handbook

Stakeholder consultation

Initial scoping of potential eligible attendees and pre-workshop consultation on key focus areas, any areas of concern, and how best to structure outputs to help meet needs of individual economies, including:

·  Development of consultation questions

·  Stakeholder interviews

·  Synthesising of key themes and areas of concern

·  Project plan adaptation based on stakeholder consultation outputs

70 hours (2 weeks)

Research and analysis:

·  Identify key successful EEI schemes and review for key elements of design, including (but not limited to) policy objectives, legal authority, fuel coverage, targets, compliance, incentives, funding and administration

·  Identify and provide examples of eligible energy saving activities

·  Provide synthesised report on key elements

·  Design of a business case framework based on best practice in key elements of EEI schemes, adaptable to different operating environments and specific jurisdictional goals

225 hours (6.5 weeks)

Case studies:

Provide selected case studies on key successful EEI schemes, including their operation, areas of success and potential areas of development:

·  Research on best practice in reviewing EEI schemes, including development of guiding principles on how best to reform already established schemes.

·  Synthesis of information to provide overview for EEI handbook publication

105 hours (3 weeks)

Project management

Revisions of the document as requested by the PO and APEC Secretariat, regular meetings, administration and publication of document, including design and quality assurance checks, discussion and planning with guest speaker

35 hours (1 week)

Output Two: Energy Efficiency Workshops

Development of materials, collateral and structure for the workshops, including

·  A detailed overview of EEI schemes and their operation

·  Development of structured activities and templates for policy staff (e.g business and economic cases)

·  Tools to identify market transformation opportunities

·  Exploration of opportunities to overcome localised market barriers

·  Tools and opportunities to link EEI schemes to other policy priorities

·  Workshops to cover topics in the handbook with options on how to apply these learning to specific economies

·  Running and administration of workshops, including participant communication, pre-workshop activities, planning of event, coordinating attendee calendars, booking of meeting spaces, flights and accommodation.

·  Liaison and planning with guest speakers, development of slides and communication materials, creation of agendas and expected deliverables, tracking of project outputs

140 hours (4 weeks)

Output Three: Publication of Supporting Resources

Revision of core documents and presentations (to adhere to APEC publication guidelines), quality assurance, design and formatting.

35 hours (1 week)

Project Management

Development of evaluation surveys, reports from evaluation surveys, completion of mandatory APEC reports, ongoing communication with PO and APEC secretariat

35 hours (1 week)

Waivers

Not Applicable.

Are there any supporting document attached?

No 
Attachments
Version: 2.0 
Created at 29/10/2018 13:51  by Lucy Phua 
Last modified at 29/10/2018 13:53  by Lucy Phua 
Version HistoryVersion History

Project No.

Project Title

Project Status

Publication (if any)

Fund Account

Sub-fund

Project Year

Project Session

APEC Funding

Co-funding Amount

Total Project Value

Sponsoring Forum

Topics

Committee

Other Fora Involved

Other Non-APEC Stakeholders Involved

Proposing Economy(ies)

Co-Sponsoring Economies

Expected Start Date

Expected Completion Date

Project Proponent Name 1

Job Title 1

Organization 1

Postal Address 1

Telephone 1

Fax 1

Email 1

Project Proponent Name 2

Job Title 2

Organization 2

Postal Address 2

Telephone 2

Fax 2

Email 2

Declaration

Project Summary

Relevance

Objectives

Alignment

TILF/ASF Justification

Beneficiaries and Outputs

Dissemination

Gender

Work Plan

Risks

Monitoring and Evaluation

Linkages

Sustainability

Project Overseers

Cost Efficiency

Drawdown Timetable

Direct Labour

Waivers

Are there any supporting document attached?

hdFldAdmin

Project Number

Previous Fora

Secretariat Comments

Reprogramming Notes

Consolidated QAF

Endorsement By Fora

PD Sign Off

Batch

Forum Priority

Committee Ranking Category

Committee Priority

PDM Priority

Priority Within Funding Category

Monitoring Report Received

Completion Report Received

PMU Field 1

PMU Field 2

PMU Field 3

On Behalf Of

Proposal Status

Originating Sub-Forum

Approval Status
Attachments
Content Type: Standard Proposal
Version:
Created at by
Last modified at by
Go Search