Project Title

Empowering a Distributed Energy Resource Future through Regulatory and Market Reforms 

Project Year

2017   

Project Number

EWG 11 2017A 

Project Session

Session 2   

Project Type

Standard 

Project Status

Project in Implementation   
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Project No.

EWG 11 2017A 

Project Title

Empowering a Distributed Energy Resource Future through Regulatory and Market Reforms 

Project Status

Project in Implementation 

Publication (if any)

 

Fund Account

APEC Support Fund 

Sub-fund

ASF: Energy Efficiency 

Project Year

2017 

Project Session

Session 2 

APEC Funding

196,522 

Co-funding Amount

19,095 

Total Project Value

215,617 

Sponsoring Forum

Energy Working Group (EWG) 

Topics

Energy 

Committee

SOM Steering Committee on Economic and Technical Cooperation (SCE) 

Other Fora Involved

 

Other Non-APEC Stakeholders Involved

 

Proposing Economy(ies)

Thailand 

Co-Sponsoring Economies

Japan; Philippines; Chinese Taipei; United States 

Expected Start Date

01/11/2017 

Expected Completion Date

30/11/2018 

Project Proponent Name 1

Wanchai Banluesinth 

Job Title 1

Director of Work Plan Division 

Organization 1

Department of Alternative Energy Development and Efficiency 

Postal Address 1

17 Rama I Rd, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330, Thailand 

Telephone 1

66-2 2230021-9 Extension 1402 

Fax 1

Not Applicable 

Email 1

66-2 2261416 

Project Proponent Name 2

Not Applicable 

Job Title 2

Not Applicable 

Organization 2

Not Applicable 

Postal Address 2

Not Applicable 

Telephone 2

Not Applicable 

Fax 2

Not Applicable 

Email 2

Not Applicable 

Declaration

Wanchai Banluesinth 

Project Summary

Sharply declining technology costs and increasing consumer interest in distributed energy resources (DER) have prompted concerns about electric utilities’ revenue sufficiency.  Electric power utilities’ common reaction to DER is to slow down, if not prevent, the scale-up of these technologies.  Working collaboratively with decision-makers in the APEC region, this project will initiate a platform for analyzing the current utility regulatory systems in selected APEC economies and sharing successful experiences of other APEC economies that have reformed their regulatory models. The cross-pollination platform will provide actionable recommendations on innovative utility business models and regulatory frameworks that incentivize utilities to ramp up DER while reducing carbon emissions. 

The findings will be presented to utilities and regulators, followed by the launch of a regional platform to engage stakeholders in forward-looking discussions on utility regulatory and business model reform. The platform will prepare stakeholders for next-generation regulatory practices in a context of high DER.

Relevance

As low-carbon transitions begin, the affordability of electricity, as well as the financial health of electric utilities, will remain paramount to promoting inclusive economic growth. Technology innovation is making distributed energy resources (DERs, including distributed generation, storage, demand response, energy efficiency and smart grid technologies) cost-effective for a growing number of electricity consumers, and demand for these technologies is increasing rapidly. In many contexts around the world, however, regulatory changes are lagging behind the pace of both consumer interest and technological innovation. DERs fundamentally challenge how electric utilities create revenue and, under the current regulatory model in many APEC economies, the adoption of DERs (if legally allowed at all) could lead to reduced utility revenue and higher retail electricity rates for non-adopting consumers. While incremental regulatory changes may remove utility disincentives to DER adoption in the short-term, more foundational changes to the regulatory paradigm, along with the utility business model itself, are required to transform distribution utilities to actively encourage (and profit from) DERs. Supporting APEC governments and utilities in these complex regulatory and market reforms will promote inclusive economic growth and low emissions development goals. This project will bring international regulatory experts to engage stakeholders in developing APEC economies to identify regulatory challenges in reaching high levels of DERs, develop policy solutions that are sustainable and acceptable to various stakeholders, and create a regulatory and market reform roadmap. This project falls under Rank 1 of APEC Funding Criteria - it will build the capacity of policy-makers, regulators, utilities, and researchers, equipping them with tools to develop a sustainable regulatory roadmap which reduces barriers to investment in clean energy technologies.  It is also linked to Rank 2, as the regulatory reforms this project would encourage growth in sustainable energy sources while ensuring utilities’ solid financial standing.

Objectives

1) Perform comprehensive gap analysis for DER deployment in select APEC developing economies, examining the current utility business model and regulatory framework through interviews and desk research. This exercise will be conducted with extensive stakeholder input, and serve as a starting point to formulate strategies which will catalyze institutional reforms and subsequent DER investment.

2) Build local knowledge base and capacity to enable regulatory and market reforms. Capacity building will include the development of universally applicable principles and skills, complemented with locally relevant information, to enable the development of reforms for specific APEC economies. This will occur through the establishment of a new platform for engaging stakeholders, including women. Through this platform, APEC developing economy practitioners will be connected to international experts to better understand global experiences and emerging best practices.

3) Create regulatory and market reform roadmap with the APEC economy stakeholders which details concrete next steps and pathways to encourage requisite utility regulatory and business model reforms in select APEC developing economies.

Alignment

The project’s objectives directly serve the Energy Working Group’s strategic plan, which aims to double the share of renewables in the APEC energy mix by 2030 and reduce APEC’s energy intensity by 45% from 2005 levels by 2035.  An improved regulatory framework for DER technologies will enable widespread deployment of distributed solar power as well as smart grid technologies that accommodate greater improvement in energy efficiency such as through demand response.

This project also aligns well with APEC’s 2017 priorities in “promoting regional economic integration via free and open trade and investment” and “supporting APEC strategy for strengthening quality growth.”   As a first priority, the promotion of regional economic integration encourages structural reform, which consists of “improvements made to institutional frameworks, regulations and government policies so that the efficient functioning of markets is supported and behind-the-border barriers are reduced.” 

This project will directly encourage structural reform by reducing “behind-the-border barriers” through catalysis of novel changes in the regulatory paradigm of electric utilities.  At the distribution level of electricity systems – where wires bring electricity to end users – the investment climate in some APEC emerging economies is closed off to new players, innovative business models, and the large majority of technological innovation. The regulatory framework that oversees how exactly utilities are rewarded, and how private companies can develop distributed energy resources, is slow to adapt to both technological changes and consumer interest to adopt distributed clean energy. Distributed energy resources such as rooftop solar, energy storage, and demand-side management offer a substantial opportunity to reduce energy prices, create jobs, move towards energy independence, promote low-carbon growth, and unlock new (and oftentimes much-needed) sources of investment for electricity infrastructure. Realizing these benefits will require substantial changes to how electric utilities are regulated and incentivized to perform.

TILF/ASF Justification

This project will focus on building skills and facilitating knowledge transfer to APEC developing economies.  The economy-level analyses will be conducted specifically for APEC developing economies. The research and analysis process will be conducted with significant stakeholder input - developing economy stakeholders will be extensively interviewed, and kept informed of the project findings in the later stages, as the project consultants uncover various findings. Once economy-level analyses are finished, customized technical trainings will be conducted under the exchange platform through workshops. These direct capacity building activities will be customized to the consultants’ assessment of the economy stakeholders’ grasps of various issues, and will be responsive to the findings of the analysis activities. Furthermore, consultants would be expected to have significant experience conducting not only high impact technical assistance activities, but also have a proven track record of conducting effective training and capacity building activities with government institutions and electric utility companies.

Beneficiaries and Outputs

Outputs: 

1) Workshop #1: DER Best Practices:
Project Team will conduct a 2-day workshop for APEC Project Participants. The first day will serve as a technical training to focus on best policy and regulatory practices for facilitating utility business model transformation, DER deployment, policy and regulatory changes, as well as a variety of other foundational electricity sector topics. The second day will significantly be more activity-based in nature, structured to make Project Participants think critically about the regulatory gaps in their own economies, and sharing those gaps with the other Project Participants. 

Participants in this workshop will be selected based on a number of criteria specific to their economies, including utility model and institutional arrangements, regulatory paradigms, utility revenue sufficiency status, amount of solar, etc.  To encourage cross-pollination of ideas, APEC economies with diverse starting points with regard to DERs deployment will be sampled into the mix of the participants.  The overall purpose of this workshop is to build capacity and facilitate relationships among Project Participants through exercises on regulatory gap analyses, laying the foundation for the project.

2) PowerPoint presentation on Regulatory Gap Analyses: The content in this PowerPoint presentation will be dedicated to the APEC economies represented in Workshop#1.  From the 2nd day of Workshop#1, participants will be guided through a structured process to : (a) identify the roadblocks and limitations in the current regulatory framework in each of their economies for DER deployment, and (b) consider specific regulatory strategies that would allow for the stimulation and integration of DER technologies  in their economy.  Through this exercise, this will enable the project team to formalize what was presented and discussed in the first workshop into a regulatory gap analysis to be completed in the month following the first workshop. The project team will assemble a PowerPoint presentation to present results to economy stakeholders and APEC project participants more broadly. The PowerPoint presentation will highlight overarching gaps in current regulatory structures that create obstacles to DER deployment and strategies to close these gaps, and may identify next steps or provide specific recommendations, based on the feedback of the Project Participants, if appropriate.

3) Workshop #2: Institutional and Regulatory Reforms for DER Deployment in APEC Economies: This stakeholder workshop will utilize gap analysis results to facilitate economy-level dialogues on potential policy and regulatory changes to foster DER deployment, as well as elucidate specific strategies to create changes in practice. The Project team will dedicate working sessions to discuss economy-level issues as a group, to encourage exchange of ideas across the APEC economies represented. Preliminary project results will be presented. Technical trainings may be offered, as needed.

4) Workshop #3: Women’s Electric Power Regulatory Leadership Forum:
This 1-day workshop will invite female participants for technical training seminars on DER regulation, also to discuss issues specific to women working in the field of electricity regulation and governance. It will also present preliminary project results for feedback, and feature prominent female leaders in energy for certain lectures.

5) Workshop Surveys. Surveys will be distributed at the end of each workshop to evaluate workshop relevance, effectiveness, and value to project participants. These surveys will be summarized and analyzed by the project team.

6) 1 Final Project Report – Project Team will write a project report offering lessons learned and roadmaps for at least 2 APEC developing economies. The report will summarize results from the gap analysis and key outcomes from project workshops, and also identify action plans and next steps for each select economy through a “regulatory road mapping” exercise. The selection of APEC economies for the roadmapping exercise will give preferences to APEC economies with greater investment liberalization potential, i.e., economies that have not liberalized its retail electricity business or are quite closed off to competition by non-utility players.  Examples include Thailand, Malaysia, and Vietnam. Latin American APEC economies have already undergone liberalization, but may be selected to elucidate their experiences and later-stage regulatory roadblocks. This report may be primarily written by Project Manager and consultant team, but may be co-authored or reviewed by Project Participants and/or other APEC members. The report will also incorporate the survey results from each workshop. 

Benefits to other APEC economies can be divided into three groups (not all mutually exclusive): 

1) APEC economies that have not opened their markets to DER investment:

a) Increased investment and economic activities (both foreign and domestic)

b) More consumer choice and consumer bill savings 

2) APEC economies with some experience with DER investment (looking to make further augmentations): Existing DER businesses can invest in newly opened APEC economies where action plans have been executed 

3) APEC economies with local DER manufacturing base: Technology suppliers and other businesses in these economies can enter newly opened markets 

Outcomes: 

1) This project will lay the groundwork for the development of specific policies, processes, and regulatory changes in the electricity sector 

By providing technical trainings which elucidate best practices, clear up common misconceptions, and provide examples of practical approaches to challenges facing DER deployment, this project can make key stakeholders more open to adopting reforms in the electric power industry. The project will help key stakeholders (e.g., policymakers, regulators, and electric power utilities) perceive concrete benefits of reform, building capacity with key staff and creating champions for reform; furthermore, it will arm them with the detailed information required to propose concrete action plans that are appropriate for their organizations - actions which promote DER deployment and economic development while preserving the financial health of electricity companies. By performing gap analyses and policy roadmapping exercises in specific APEC developing economies, a broader set of lessons can be gleaned for other APEC economies. In terms of specific foreseen policies, processes, and regulatory changes, these may include creation of: net energy metering or feed-in tariff programs for DER; creation of standard DER interconnection processes and contracts; changes to more market-based regulated tariffs for electricity; or regulatory changes which shift how utilities recover their costs.

2) This project will help to liberalize investment in the electricity sector in APEC developing economies, unlocking new sources of much-needed investment and spurring new economic development

By unlocking investment in DER, this project will empower everyday consumers of electricity to begin investing their capital in electricity generation infrastructure, as well as energy efficiency investments. Many APEC developing economies are not fully electrified, and furthermore electricity companies experience revenue issues and a high cost of capital for new investment. By allowing consumers to investment in DERs, this will free up both capital and energy to be used for other pressing needs.

3) The regulatory reforms identified in the project outputs have the potential for significant job creation in APEC economies. The physical installation and marketing of DERs is a highly job-intensive process relative to other types of power generation infrastructure; regulatory changes in the electricity sector which promote DER technologies would lead to significant potential economic development and job creation.

4) This project will help to ensure that electricity companies in APEC developing economies remain financially sustainable while incorporating new technological innovation

There are significant myths and misconceptions in the electricity sector about the impact of DERs on electricity companies which impede reform in many settings, the most notable of which is that DERs will consistently negatively impact the revenue of electricity companies. However, in practice, many regulatory approaches can be employed to mitigate this possible outcome through the creation of innovative business models that provide incentives for utilities to encourage and develop DER in their service territories, though these approaches are not always well known. This project can help promote these approaches and customize their application to the conditions of specific APEC developingeconomies, helping to preserve the revenue sufficiency of electricity companies while also promoting the deployment of new and innovative DER technologies with broad co-benefits.

Beneficiaries: 
The beneficiaries to this project are diverse and at various levels of responsibility and expertise. The direct project beneficiaries are divided into three groups: 

1) Workshop Participants: The project will include three workshops, as per the Work Plan, with focuses on technical training, institutional capacity building, long-term strategic thinking, and the role of women in electricity governance and regulation. The workshop participants will directly benefit from the project activities through technical trainings, as well as being guided through a structured process to consider their own economy’s circumstances as it relates to DERs and regulatory constructs. Given the variety of topical areas, the workshop will engage technical staff from power utilities, electricity regulators, policymakers, and the energy research and analysis communities, ranging from mid-level management to higher level executives and political appointees. Though the workshops will be held in Thailand, participants from various APEC economies will be invited, leveraging the project team’s extensive professional networks to reach out to potential participants, and hosted with project funds. The team will ensure that there is gender balance in the first two workshops, not only in the composition of those invited to the workshop but also in terms of carefully facilitated workshop participation. In addition, the third workshop participants will predominantly be women who have been identified as particularly skilled in their leadership and technical abilities. While an emphasis will be placed on finding the right project participants to maximize impact, the project will also seek out participants who have other APEC fora involvement, from the APEC Climate Centre and the APEC Gender Focal Point Network, for example, and encourage a wide range of staff to become involved when appropriate. 

2) APEC Economy Government Agencies: The project outcomes, outlined in the section above, will directly benefit APEC government agencies, in particular Energy Ministries, Electricity Regulators, state-owned utilities, and policy makers that have (or could in the future have) direct involvement in DER programs. Through the workshops and comprehensive dissemination activities of the final project deliverables, these various APEC government agencies will develop a better understanding of the issues that will need to be addressed to further the advancement of DER, and be better equipped to develop policies and customized roadmaps for their DER programs. A subset of the APEC economies will have a direct involvement in the workshops. The project team will select APEC economiesbased on their interest in developing DER programs, whether they be very early in the process or fairly advanced. Potential participants will be asked to provide a written statement explaining how this project could benefit their specific APEC economy, enabling the project team to select those participants who are most motivated and likely to champion regulatory changes. A large range in experience levels will ensure cross-pollination of ideas among project participants.

3) Society At Large:
The project team will help the workshop participants and policymakers identify strategies to strengthen institutions that will further the development of DER and its associated benefits to society, including the creation of jobs, reduced dependence on foreign energy sources, liberalization of investment frameworks, and reductions in electricity sector carbon emissions.

Dissemination

As mentioned in Section 5, this proposed project will produce at least two PowerPoint presentations and one Final Report. It will also produce three Workshops, for which there will be some to-be-determined amount of publishable training material. All relevant material is intended to be accessible electronically and available through a dedicated website. The dissemination efforts will make use of the project team’s professional networks, social and professional media outreach. The intended audience for these materials is policymakers, electricity sector regulators, and electricity company staff in: the select APEC developing economies where the project focuses its gap analyses; other APEC developing economies; and developing economies globally with similar electric sector governance and institutional arrangements. Outputs will be useful to the clean energy development community at large, and thus can be disseminated to bilateral and multilateral development agency staff, private foundations working in the clean energy space, as well as a broader network of clean energy technical assistance practitioners. All outputs produced under the project will comply with APEC Publications, IP Policy and Logo Guidelines, and submitted to the APEC Secretariat, to be included in the APEC Publications Database which is a publicly and freely available dissemination platform.

With respect to a dissemination plan, qualified consultants are expected to be well-networked in the clean energy space, offering extensive connections to practitioners in the global energy community. They should be in a position to disseminate information through established clean energy education online platforms and clean energy communication networks. Consultants will need to propose a draft communication plan, to be evaluated in a Request for Proposals, which maximizes outreach and impact of project activities. 

All products and outputs from this project would be made publicly available and free-of-charge, unless otherwise desired by APEC.

Gender

This project is designed to enhance the local knowledgebase on policy and regulation for increased DER deployment, and also to actively solicit stakeholder inputs through a regulatory gap analysis process.  Women who work in this area, including policymakers, regulators, and entrepreneurs, can have their capacity enhanced to help drive regulatory and market reforms. The project team will make specific efforts to ensure that the project outputs are disseminated to women already working in the sector, through targeted emails, industrial affinity groups for women in energy, and using Linked-In to identify women in the industry and ensure that their participation is solicited and results are disseminated to them. 

To ensure women achieve the project’s benefits, the project will require project team to pursue an equal gender mix for workshop participants, as well as interviewees during regulatory gap analysis. During one of the workshop sessions, gender-sensitive indicators will be discussed and the group will develop gender-sensitive indicators to the success of a DER program. In addition, consultants will be asked to identify women who have done outstanding work in advancing policy or regulatory reform in order to showcase their leadership in Women’s Electric Power Regulatory Leadership Forum and serve as inspirations for future female leaders.

Work Plan

Start date

Phase

Activities

Outputs

Nov. 2017

Planning and Preliminary Gap Analysis

-Plan project and select developing APEC economies for gap analysis

-Identify and recruit women leaders to participate in Women’s Electric Power Regulatory Leadership Forum

-Event planning for Workshop #1

1) Detailed project plan

2) Draft list of expected participants in the two workshops and Women’s Electric Power Regulatory Leadership Forum

3) Draft Agenda for Workshop #1

`Jan.  2018

Stakeholder Interviews and First Workshop

-Conduct in-person interviews in selected APEC developing economies with key policymakers, regulators and electricity company staff

-Conduct first workshop in Bangkok to review policy and regulatory reforms in APEC economies where such reforms have occurred and explore challenges/opportunities in other APEC economies

1) PowerPoint presentations summarizing preliminary gap analysis for at least 2 APEC developing economies

2) Workshop #1 presentations

3) Workshop #1 attendee survey results

Mar. 2018

Research and Analysis Period

- Conduct in-depth interviews and action planning teleconferences with APEC Developing Economies for roadmap development

-In-person interviews, as needed

- Event planning for Workshops #2 and #3 

1) Preliminary draft of final report

2) Internal APEC project update

3) Draft agenda and attendee list for workshops #2 and #3

Aug. 2018

Workshops #2 and #3

-Conduct workshops #2 and #3 sequentially over a 1 week period

1) Workshop #2 completed

2) Workshop #2 presentations

3) Workshop #2 attendee survey results

4) Workshop #3 completed

5) Workshop #3 presentations

6) Workshop #3 attendee survey results

Oct. 2018

Final Analysis Period

-Incorporate feedback from workshop into final report

-Follow up with workshop participants for inputs into the roadmaps.

-Follow up with workshop participants to identify individual responsibilities in advancing towards the regulatory goals.

-Further report drafting efforts

1) Final report

Risks

Though this project does have risks that could impact implementation, careful planning and execution could greatly mitigate any risks involved.

First, effective project implementation and maximum impact would be difficult to achieve if the Project Team does not identify the most appropriate participants in the workshops that are (a) able to create changes in their organizations, (b) motivated to impact DER programs in their economy, (c) appropriate recipients of technical and institutional trainings based on their specific backgrounds and career trajectories. This highlights the importance of having a Project Team with strong existing relationships in one or more of the targeted APEC developing economies, as a well- connected Project Team is most likely to reduce the risk of a poor participant choice.

Second, APEC economies are at various stages in the development of their DER programs. Whereas some economies have a relatively extensive experience with DERs and already have strong DER programs, others have not yet begun DER development and are at the very beginning of their DER programs. Hence there is a risk that the workshops and project deliverables are not relevant to some of the target beneficiaries of the project. However, the large range in experiences can also be used to benefit the project, as there are many lessons learned that can be shared during the workshops to learn from each other’s experiences. The information flow does not necessarily have to be one way; even APEC economies that are relatively advanced in their DER programs can learn from blue sky ideas put forth by less experienced participants.

Third, there is a certain level of political risk, as with most energy-related projects, as APEC economies’ priorities can change making the outcomes less relevant to the economies that have decided to change directions with respect to DER. Though there is little that this project can do to reduce the risk of higher-level executives and political actors making sweeping decisions with respect to DERs, experience in the past few years have shown that most economies have been very receptive to the development of national DER programs; these programs are typically seen as inevitable, as costs for DER technologies have fallen dramatically as consumer interests have risen. The project outcomes will remain widely applicable to APEC economies even if one or two economies resist the transition towards greater development of DERs.

Each of these aforementioned risks can be mitigated by the project team through careful planning and thoughtful project implementation. 

Fourth, maximum impact will only be achieved if the project team is made of highly qualified individuals, with expertise in: (a) renewable energy regulatory and policy research, (b) regulatory gap analysis, and (c) international capacity building and training in the clean energy space. The project team will also need to have the strong existing relationships in one or more of the targeted APEC economies, as mentioned above. The risk of selecting an under-qualified team can be mitigated through a rigorous selection process, focusing on the project team’s, international experience (team must have extensive experience working in various international contexts, with experience and connections in Thailand, the host economy), professional backgrounds (applied (research and academic institutes preferred), and educational background (PhDs preferred for at least 2 team members)., and educational background (PhDs preferred for at least 2 team members).

Monitoring and Evaluation

This Project includes a list of indicators that will measure the achievement of each objective, as shown in the Table below.  The indicators are designed to measure immediate outcomes, which would occur during the project period or immediately after the project ends.  The approaches of measurements mainly include surveys and keeping records of interactions with stakeholders through the project period. Expected long-term outcomes are described in Section 6. These impacts may not occur during the project period, but could be followed up on with future work and/or evaluated for progress in future years. 

Objectives

Immediate Outcomes

Indicators

1. Perform comprehensive gap analysis for DER deployment in select APEC developing economies, examining the current utility business model and regulatory framework through interviews and desk research. This exercise will be conducted with extensive stakeholder input, and serve as a starting point to formulate strategies which will catalyze institutional reforms and subsequent
DER investment.

Significant stakeholder engagement and inputs into gap analysis efforts

1. Number of interviewed stakeholders, disaggregated by economy, types of organizations, and gender (greater than ten (10) from at least three(3) APEC economies)

2. Presentation of gap analysis results by APEC developing economy project participant to their respective institution

2. Build local knowledge base and capacity to
enable regulatory and market reforms. This will
occur through the establishment of a new platform for engaging stakeholders, including women.

Through this platform, APEC developing economy practitioners will be connected to international

experts to better understand global experiences

and emerging best practices.

-Increased understanding of

approaches and challenges to DER deployment and the benefits of reform.

-Increased interactions between APEC developing economy stakeholders and international experts

1. Number of participants in workshops, disaggregated by economy, types of organizations, and gender (at least twenty-five (25) participants for each workshop, of which at least fifteen (15) women during the Women’s workshop)

2. The increase in the level of knowledge of the workshop participants, measured through surveys before and after the workshops.

2. Continued interactions through the web, such as through document downloads, Webinar attendance, etc.

3. Create regulatory and market reform roadmap

with the APEC economy stakeholders which details concrete next steps and pathways to encourage requisite utility regulatory and business model

reforms in select APEC developing economies.

Stakeholders’ engagement and inputs into economy-wide regulatory roadmap development process

1. Number of stakeholders providing written and verbal input into roadmap documentation effort (at least ten (10) from at least three (3) APEC economies).

2. Number of participants in workshops, disaggregated by economies, types of organizations, and gender

Linkages

This project will provide updates to relevant groups within APEC, especially the Expert Group on New and Renewable Energy Technologies, on the project’s activities and invite their members to participate either as attendees, observers, or speakers in the workshops.  In addition, the consultants are expected to tap into APEC fora’s in-economy networks to help identify the right interviewees for the research as well as the right participants to join the workshops.

This project will complement the work of two ongoing projects listed below. The achievement of the long-term outcomes of these two projects depends partly upon the kind of enabling environment that this project is aiming to build.

1) APEC Low-Carbon Model Towns (LCMT) Projects:  Low-Carbon towns typically require the deployment of local energy resources such as DERs, and to date, these are introduced as pilot projects. To scale up the success of the Low-Carbon Model Towns initiated in these APEC projects, the wider regulatory environment in the electric power sector must change to enable (and perhaps incentivize) DER deployment. This project is expected to result in actions mobilizing policies, processes, and regulatory changes that would ease the adoption of DERs and hence make the replication of the Low-Carbon Model Towns possible on economy-wide.

2) APEC Conferences on Good Regulatory Practices: These annual APEC conferences aim to expand the application of Good Regulatory Practices (GRPs) as a tool to reduce barriers to trade and to encourage investment and economic growth. The electric power industry is a sector that is in serious need of GRPs applications, particularly in light of the rapidly changing technology landscape. The project can draw on GRP principles and incorporate them into the gap analysis and roadmap development process.

In addition, the project activities can incorporate key actors involved in both the APEC LCMT and GRPs projects, and the project outputs will provide enriched materials that feed into both ongoing projects. With respect to engaging with groups outside of APEC, Section 8 details the proposed dissemination strategy.

APEC, as a well-respected multilateral convening body, is in a strong position to provide guidance to developing APEC economies on the oftentimes politically sensitive topic of energy market reform. There is a range of international best practices available from APEC economies to draw insights from.  APEC developing economies will be more receptive to hearing new ideas in this space through APEC than through bilateral development relationships.

Sustainability

Two of the principal focus areas for the project are (a) targeted human capacity-building and (b) participative strategic development of DER action plans (which is also referred to in this proposal as “regulatory roadmaps”). Skills that are developed during the workshops will be transferred to the participant’s home institutions by the workshop participants, and the action plans can be used as the framework for new DER regulatory structures. The two economy-wide action plans developed by the project team in consultation with workshop participants can be used directly by the policy makers and utilities in the target economies, and can serve as a well-developed illustrative roadmaps for other economies with similar DER program aspirations in the APEC region, which can be used to form their own.

These two economy-wide regulatory roadmaps for the development of DER programs will be drafted using the ideas, strategies, and feedback from workshop participants. The workshops are to be highly interactive, ensuring that all participants are involved and engaged. By providing direct input into roadmaps, participants are likely to feel ownership of the final project deliverables, and hence they are more likely to be advocates for their implementation beyond the duration of the project. The project team is to follow-up with participants to identify individual responsibilities in advancing towards the regulatory goals identified in the roadmap and to encourage participants to maintain contact among themselves to improve accountability.

To ensure that the project results in the desired outcome, it will be necessary that the impact of the project extends far beyond the workshop participants. Progress towards the outcomes described in Question 6 can be measured by: 

-  The number of high-level executives in the various stakeholder groups that are exposed to the work outputs. The Project Team will share the results of the work directly to high-level executives -- either as in person presentations, phone meetings, or direct delivery of the output documents.

-  The percentage of workshop participants who report back to their home departments. To increase the impact of the workshops, workshop participants will be asked to report the findings of the workshop to their colleagues. The project team will follow up with the workshop participants to ensure that they have effectively disseminated the information to their home departments within one (1) month of the final workshop.

-  The number of government agencies that did not participate in the workshops but engaged directly with the workshop material, either demonstrated through direct communication with the project team, the workshop participants, through social media or other trackable internet activity within three (3) months of the final project deliverables made accessible publicly.

Project Overseers

Name: Mr. Wanchai Banluesinth
Title: Director of Work Plan Division
Organization: Department of Alternative Energy Development and Efficiency
Postal address: 17 Rama I Rd., Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 Thailand
Tel: +662 223 0021-9 ext 1402               E-mail: +662 226 1416

‘Mr. Wanchai graduated with a Master Degree of Political Science  (Public Management) and is Deputy Director General of DEDE. He was responsible for DEDE’s Work Plan Division for more than 4 years, and is experienced in project planning, monitoring and evaluation as well as budget planning.  He is member of several management committees in DED including for the Alternative Energy Development Plan 2015-2036 (AEDP) and the AEDP Action Plan; the Energy Efficiency Plan 2015-2036 (EEP) and the EEP Action Plan; and the Energy Storage Technology Research and Development.

Cost Efficiency

Not Applicable.

Drawdown Timetable

Not Applicable.

Direct Labour

The contractor fees are for the project team, which will include three international experts. These experts are to have significant international experience working with government, electric utilities, and electricity regulatory commissions, as well as research experience (PhDs preferred). At least one of the experts should have deep knowledge of the ASEAN energy context and experiences working with stakeholders in the electric power sectors of APEC developing economies. The project team will be fully responsible for execution of project outputs, and supported by two local research assistants. 

The project will hire one person to conduct clerical work for a total of 24 hours over the project period.

Waivers

Not Applicable.

Are there any supporting document attached?

No 
Attachments
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Project No.

Project Title

Project Status

Publication (if any)

Fund Account

Sub-fund

Project Year

Project Session

APEC Funding

Co-funding Amount

Total Project Value

Sponsoring Forum

Topics

Committee

Other Fora Involved

Other Non-APEC Stakeholders Involved

Proposing Economy(ies)

Co-Sponsoring Economies

Expected Start Date

Expected Completion Date

Project Proponent Name 1

Job Title 1

Organization 1

Postal Address 1

Telephone 1

Fax 1

Email 1

Project Proponent Name 2

Job Title 2

Organization 2

Postal Address 2

Telephone 2

Fax 2

Email 2

Declaration

Project Summary

Relevance

Objectives

Alignment

TILF/ASF Justification

Beneficiaries and Outputs

Dissemination

Gender

Work Plan

Risks

Monitoring and Evaluation

Linkages

Sustainability

Project Overseers

Cost Efficiency

Drawdown Timetable

Direct Labour

Waivers

Are there any supporting document attached?

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Project Number

Previous Fora

Secretariat Comments

Reprogramming Notes

Consolidated QAF

Endorsement By Fora

PD Sign Off

Batch

Forum Priority

Committee Ranking Category

Committee Priority

PDM Priority

Priority Within Funding Category

Monitoring Report Received

Completion Report Received

PMU Field 1

PMU Field 2

PMU Field 3

On Behalf Of

Proposal Status

Originating Sub-Forum

Approval Status
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