Project Title

Workshop on Customs Best Practices to Identify Illegal Timber and Wood Products 

Project Year

2017   

Project Number

EGILAT 01 2017A 

Project Session

Session 1   

Project Type

Standard 

Project Status

Project in Implementation   
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Project No.

EGILAT 01 2017A 

Project Title

Workshop on Customs Best Practices to Identify Illegal Timber and Wood Products 

Project Status

Project in Implementation 

Publication (if any)

 

Fund Account

APEC Support Fund 

Sub-fund

ASF: General Fund 

Project Year

2017 

Project Session

Session 1 

APEC Funding

112,000 

Co-funding Amount

10,000 

Total Project Value

122,000 

Sponsoring Forum

APEC Experts Group on Illegal Logging and Associated Trade (EGILAT) 

Topics

Illegal Logging 

Committee

SOM Steering Committee on Economic and Technical Cooperation (SCE) 

Other Fora Involved

Sub-Committee on Customs Procedures (SCCP) 

Other Non-APEC Stakeholders Involved

 

Proposing Economy(ies)

United States 

Co-Sponsoring Economies

Australia; Canada; Chile; Malaysia; Papua New Guinea; Philippines 

Expected Start Date

01/06/2017 

Expected Completion Date

31/10/2017 

Project Proponent Name 1

Luke Thompson 

Job Title 1

Foreign Affairs Officer 

Organization 1

US Department of State 

Postal Address 1

2201 C Street NW, Washington, DC 20520, USA 

Telephone 1

1-202 6470658 

Fax 1

Not Applicable 

Email 1

ThompsonLD@state.gov 

Project Proponent Name 2

Not Applicable 

Job Title 2

Not Applicable 

Organization 2

Not Applicable 

Postal Address 2

Not Applicable 

Telephone 2

Not Applicable 

Fax 2

Not Applicable 

Email 2

Not Applicable 

Declaration

Luke Thompson 

Project Summary

This project will work to combat the international trade in illegal wood products, estimated to account for 10-30 percent of all wood traded globally, valued between $30-100 billion annually. APEC leaders have on several occasions identified the fight against illegal logging as a priority issue for APEC economies.  This two day workshop will share customs best practices in responding to trade in illegal wood products. Participants will be technical experts from international organizations and customs/law enforcement representatives from APEC Economies. The workshop will include discussion of:

·  Technologies and methods for identifying species of wood to detect illegality;

·  Paperwork required under APEC economies’ laws and international conventions;

·  Actions customs and law enforcement officials may take when illegally trafficked wood products are discovered; and

·  Customs integrity.

Participation aims to strengthen participants’ abilities to identify legally and illegally traded wood products and take appropriate action.

Relevance

This project works to combat illegal logging and associated trade (ILAT), estimated to account for 10-30 percent of all wood traded globally, valued at $30-100 billion annually. ILAT deprives economies of significant revenues derived from legal and sustainable management of their forests, and negatively impacts the price for legally harvested wood products. This project is highly relevant to APEC members, as they account for over 50 percent of the world’s forests and approximately 80 percent of global trade in wood products. Working to combat ILAT by strengthening customs capabilities will enhance trade facilitation for legally produced and traded wood products in the APEC region. Customs officials provide the front line of enforcement to deter trans-boundary movement of illegal wood products in trade. Sharing of customs best practices in the APEC region supports strong borders that can thwart ILAT. 

This project primarily falls under Rank 1 – Trade Facilitation and Liberalization, because this workshop will facilitate legal trade by building capacity to prevent ILAT.  The project is also linked to Rank 2, as a project supporting conservation, sustainable management, and combating ILAT.

Objectives

·  To build capacity for customs and law enforcement officials of APEC economies by providing information on practices, methods, and tools to recognize and intercept illegal wood products in trade. The workshop will specifically focus on the customs environment and technologies and practices that will help authorities to distinguish between legal and illegally traded wood products.  The workshop is also expected to facilitate effective domestic linkages between customs and forestry officials;

·  To share among participants information on innovative customs best practices, methods, and technologies for detecting illegal wood products currently being used by customs and law enforcement officials of APEC economies and recommended by multilateral organizations involved in the Green Customs Initiative, including the World Customs Organization (WCO), UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), INTERPOL, the CITES secretariat, and the Global Timber Tracking Network, International Tropical Timber Organization (ITTO), and Food and Agriculture Organization of  the United Nations (FAO).  These best practices will include risk assessment and profiling to better identify illegal wood shipments; new and emerging technologies used to identify wood species in order to detect falsely identified wood; timber traceability systems used to distinguish legal wood products; recognizing false wood trade documentation; and documentation required under relevant plant protection conventions (e.g. CITES).  This information will be compiled into a resource document to be shared within the SCCP and EGILAT working groups and with other APEC bodies interested in such a tool; and

·  To create a customs points of contact network from among participating customs authorities for purposes of sharing/obtaining information to assist in determining the legality of wood.

Alignment

·  The 2016 APEC Ministerial Meeting Joint Statement supported “concrete steps to fight against ILAT in the region and efforts to facilitate law enforcement cooperation within and among APEC economies.” It also supported “measures to establish effective timber traceability systems, including through strengthened government capacity.”  The workshop will directly increase the capacity of Customs and law enforcement officials to detect illegal wood products in trade, including through the improved use of timber traceability systems.

·  APEC Leaders in 2010, 2011, 2012, 2015 and 2016 and APEC Meetings of Ministers Responsible for Forestry in 2011, 2013, and 2015 committed to combat ILAT by building the capacity of customs or other relevant administrations in APEC economies.

·  The 2015 APEC Meeting of Ministers Responsible for Forestry committed to enhance cooperation among APEC economies to share information and best practices on enforcement efforts and policies that are successful in combating ILAT.

·  The Anti-Corruption and Transparency Working Group (ACTWG) agenda on combating corruption and illicit trade, through its Pathfinder Dialogues, has included efforts to combat the illicit networks that traffic in illegally harvested wood products.

·  The SCCP Workplan, in alignment with APEC priorities and 2017 funding criteria, focuses on trade facilitation and promoting secure trade. Trade in illegal wood products poses a threat to both priorities. Decreasing this threat by increasing awareness and knowledge of best practices in the global supply chain and strengthening skills to better implement customs procedures will assist in the efficiency of trade facilitation and consequently move economies toward more secure trade in the APEC region.

. The EGILAT 2013-2017 Strategic Plan and current Work Plan, in alignment with APEC priorities and 2017 funding criteria, calls for facilitating and strengthening law enforcement cooperation and information sharing related to combating ILAT, and  identifies collaboration with other APEC fora, including SCCP, on cross-cutting issues such as law enforcement cooperation and customs issues as a key performance indicator.

TILF/ASF Justification

This project will support the capacity building needs of developing APEC economies by providing training from international customs and law enforcement experts from multilateral organizations to recognize and intercept illegally harvested wood products in trade, as well as shared learning from the experiences and best practices of APEC economies themselves.  While this content is relevant and useful for all APEC economies, it will be specifically targeted to address developing economy members’ capacity building needs, examining the customs environment of export, import, and transshipment.  Proper identification and removal of illegally harvested wood products from supply chains increases supply-side opportunities for market access for legal wood products trade.  Four developing economies officially co-sponsor this project – they, and all EGILAT and SCCP members, will be actively consulted in the design of the workshop and its specific agenda and content in order to provide the most responsive and useful outputs for developing economy needs.

Beneficiaries and Outputs

Outputs: The workshop will provide several tangible and useful outputs as described below.  Written materials will be shared with EGILAT and SCCP members, as well as other interested APEC fora as appropriate.

Direct knowledge sharing/training and skills development for customs and law enforcement officials and practitioners to better recognize and intercept illegally harvested wood products in trade, focusing on the customs environment and the use of technologies and practices to distinguish between legal and illegally traded wood products.

Best Practices Resource Tool
compiling shared best practices will be shared following the workshop, which may include:

-  risk assessment and profiling to better identify illegal wood shipments;

- new and emerging technologies used to identify wood species and detect falsely identified wood;

- timber traceability systems used to distinguish legal wood products;

- recognizing false wood trade documentation; and

- documentation required under relevant plant protection conventions (e.g. CITES).

Where possible, the workshop organizers will seek to leverage existing resources, materials, and programs such as the UNODC Best Practices Guide for Forensic Timber Identification and its law enforcement best practice flow diagram for timber; the UNODC-World Customs Organization WCO) Global Container Control Programme; the TRAFFIC, WCO and International Tropical Timber Organization (ITTO) initiative to develop timber trade guidelines to assist frontline customs authorities; the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), European Commission, and European Forestry Institute (EFI) scoping study to examine ASEAN timber trade, customs, and timber legality; the Global Timber Tracking Network technical resources to track timber; and CITES and International Consortium on Combating Wildlife Crime (ICCWC) resources and tools. 

Customs Points of Contact Network from among participating customs authorities for purposes of collaboration, sharing/obtaining information, all to assist in determining the legality of wood. 

Overall this workshop will provide important face-to-face networking opportunities for customs and law enforcement officials and practitioners in APEC economies to form working relationships and enable collaboration. 

Outcomes: The medium to long-term aim is to foster application and deployment of the knowledge and best practices learned at the workshop in participants’ home economy. Specific aspirational outcomes include:

·  higher quality risk assessments and profiling in APEC economies to better identify illegal wood shipments;

·  deployment of state-of-the-art technologies used to identify wood species in order to detect falsely identified wood;

·  implementation of timber traceability systems used to distinguish legal wood products;

·  higher rates of recognition among APEC economy customs officials of both the documentation required under relevant plant protection conventions and of false wood trade documentation;

·  increased capacity for APEC customs officials to train internally (training trainers).  In addition to skills development, a target outcome is increased intra and inter-economy communication and collaboration of customs and law enforcement officials to more effectively deter the trade in illegal forest products and facilitate the legal timber trade in the APEC region. 

These outcomes may, if appropriate, be reflected in future work plans of the working groups. 

Beneficiaries: Participants will be drawn from all participating APEC economies, but targeting developing economies, and will primarily be mid-level customs/law enforcement officials with policy and operational responsibilities, as well as members of the SCCP and EGILAT. Such officials who directly perform and oversee customs operations with respect to wood products moving in trade at the borders of APEC economies have been identified as the personnel who would most benefit from the discussion of innovative customs best practices and technologies for detecting illegal wood products.  These officials will also be able to share practices and technologies that they use to detect illegal wood products with their counterparts from other APEC economies.  The workshop participants and speakers will also include representatives from relevant multilateral and research organizations, particularly those involved in the Green Customs Initiative, such as the WCO, INTERPOL and the UNODC, the European Forestry Institute, as well as customs/other law enforcement and government representatives and potentially NGO, academic, and private sector representatives who can share examples of effective best practices.

Dissemination

This project plans to develop and disseminate a Best Practices Resource Tool of compiled best practices, techniques and processes collected from the workshop, which will be shared with the target audiences of EGILAT and SCCP members and other APEC economies that are interested.  Organizers will offer to publish this document for broad access on the APEC EGILAT and SCCP websites as approved by each fora.  In addition, the proposed customs points of contact network may produce written materials to help organize future communication and collaboration among and within economies.  Due to the sometimes-sensitive nature of details pertaining to customs and law enforcement, such materials will be distributed only to EGILAT, SCCP, or other APEC members and parties as approved by the sharing economies.  In addition, project organizers will work with the Secretariat to consider whether a media release regarding the workshop, perhaps in conjunction with an international organization such as INTERPOL, may be appropriate.

Gender

While the customs sector and related activities do not readily lend to gender specification, the workshop will aim to achieve gender balance (50%) in the attendee participation and, where possible, in technical expert and presenter contributions as well, taking into account criteria for travel support and other considerations.  Such design aims to highlight female expertise and encourage female participation in the customs and law enforcement fields, activities, and deepen their professional networks.

Work Plan

Timeline

Actions

May 15-19,
2017

Develop full project proposal, seek quality assurance framework (QAF) from co-sponsors, and incorporate feedback.

May 22-26, 2017

Proposal co-sponsors and other fora members review and provide feedback on full project proposal.  Input is incorporated into revised proposal and submitted to full EGILAT for endorsement.

June 2,
2017

Submit revised, EGILAT-endorsed proposal to APEC Secretariat.

June 3-29 2017

-  Develop workshop agenda with SCCP, EGILAT, co-sponsors and host.

-  Preliminary discussions and scheduling of external and internal experts and speakers.

-  Committee developing the agenda will seek contributions from relevant organizations working in this space, including the WCO, INTERPOL, UNODC, ITTO, FAO, GTTN, and relevant NGOs.

-  Coordinate early venue reservations, scheduling with APEC secretariat, notify participant economies of event - socialize topics and tentative dates.

-  Reach out to fellow EGILAT members to identify appropriate customs officials for participation in the workshop.


June 29,
2017

Final approval decision - if positive, immediately send formal invitations and begin travel arrangements for speakers, participants, venues, etc.  Continue seeking additional funds to maximize APEC customs official participation.

July 2017

Finalize: Agenda, reservations, scheduling

August 2017

Hold 2-day workshop, preferably prior to EGILAT and SCCP meetings, on Margins of SOM3 2017 in Ho Chi Minh City, Viet Nam.

September 2017

-  Contractor submits all notes taken at the workshop as well as the expert presentations to POs.

-  Contractor and POs meet to discuss appropriate outline and format for the Best Practices Resource Tool.

-  Contractor commences drafting of the Tool, reaching out to experts, workshop participants and EGILAT members as needed.

November 2017

Best Practices Resource Tool is finalized, sent to all economies and shared with other relevant organizations as approved.

February 2018

First follow up survey to track results (margins SOM1 2018)

August 2018

Final follow up survey to track results (margins SOM2 2018), and readout of results to EGILAT and SCCP membership.

Risks

Implementation Risks

Description

Mitigation Strategy

Speakers

Obtaining appropriate expertise

Early and frequent communication with experts and organizations to obtain the appropriate level of expertise and their availability (already underway)

Cancellations

Secure backup speakers in the event one or more experts need to cancel

Participants

Obtaining appropriate expertise

Work early with all participating economies to ensure that proper operational level participants are identified and enabled to attend.

Obtaining gender balance

Ask that participating economies send female as well as male attendees and, where possible, select female speakers.

Logistics and Scheduling

Conflicting schedules with participating APEC WGs (SCCP, ACTWG)

Work early with APEC secretariat  and host economy to manage and de-conflict any competing schedules between working groups, host, etc.

Survey Responses

Ensuring adequate number of survey responses from economies

Design surveys to be both easy and quick to complete, while ensuring the necessary information is being obtained.  Work with PD to issue reminders to economies to respond, and reaching out to individual economies where necessary.

Monitoring and Evaluation

In addition to enhanced capacity for customs/law enforcement officials, a compilation of lessons learned and best practices related to intercepting illegal wood products in the customs environment will be made available to SCCP and EGILAT members as well as other APEC bodies, e.g. the ACTWG, the WCO, INTERPOL and other interested parties. Project organizers will develop a short pre-workshop survey to gauge interests/knowledge of participants to help shape workshop sessions, and establish basic baseline knowledge and gender participation, and subsequently will also circulate a post workshop questionnaire to gather input on content and impact on participants’ knowledge. Data will be collected against indicators which may include, but are not limited to: 

·  Number of participants (disaggregated by gender);  Target: 50 participants

·  Number of participants reporting increased ability to recognize and intercept illegally harvested wood products in trade (relative to baseline, disaggregated by gender); Target: 20 participants

·  Number of participants reporting use of resources and tools supplied at workshop; Target: 30 participants

·  Number of participants reporting instances of application of knowledge acquired during the workshop in their jobs (disaggregated by gender); Target: 20 participants

·  Number of participants reporting utility in establishing customs point of contact network (disaggregated by gender); Target: 30 participants

·  Number of reported instances of intra or inter-economy communication or collaboration in the customs and law enforcement fields regarding ILAT, directly or indirectly resulting from participation at the workshop (disaggregated by direct/indirect, at 6 months and 1 year intervals); Target: 10 participants 

Survey questions may also include: 

· Additional tools or resources needed to be able to better detect illegal wood products in trade (information could be used to develop additional materials or working group activities)

. How best to convey the workshop’s outputs and results to officials of APEC economies.

Linkages

This workshop will complement other efforts to build Customs capacity, e.g., through the Green Customs Initiative involving WCO, INTERPOL, UNODC, UNEP, ITTO, FAO and CITES, as well as those targeted at broader law enforcement capacity building, e.g. INTERPOL Project LEAF and the ACTWG Pathfinder Dialogues. The workshop organizers will also disseminate the agenda for, and information about, the workshop through these organizations in order to increase attendance by relevant officials.  The workshop is expected to have direct linkages to and will build on the SCCP’s 2015 customs workshop on best practices with respect to wildlife trafficking.  The workshop also complements and builds on EGILAT’s development of the Common Understanding of the Scope of Illegal Logging and Associated Trade and compilation of information on the laws of APEC Economies relevant to ILAT.  ACTWG members will also be invited to attend and share information on their work that is relevant to the work of customs officials. This program decreases the probability of duplication across APEC fora and activities as well as those of other non-APEC activities by providing an opportunity to share information between these groups, leverage resources and efforts, and increase overall complementarity and effectiveness.  APEC is the most appropriate source of funding for this effort due to its region-specific alignment with the workshop’s aims, advancing trade liberalization and facilitation through more effective efforts to combat illegal logging and associated trade in the customs environment.  APEC is also the appropriate forum for this workshop since APEC economies account for approximately 80 percent of global trade in wood products.

Sustainability

After the workshop has concluded, a series of next steps are planned to ensure that the event continues to have a lasting and sustainable impact.  These include but are not limited to:

·  Compilation and publication/dissemination of Best Practices Resource Tool to EGILAT, SCCP, ACTWG and other interested APEC and non-APEC parties as approved, including ITTO, FAO, INTERPOL, UNODC, WCO, and others.  The tool will also be provided to all participants and individuals included on the customs point of contact list developed as part of this workshop.  In addition to electronic dissemination of the Tool to these groups, the POs will (and EGILAT members will be encouraged to) include mention of the Tool in any presentations given at meetings of the aforementioned organizations, and internally with relevant departments and agencies of attendees home economies.

·  Encourage dissemination of tool and materials to broader practitioners in home economies (train-the-trainers).

·  Design and incorporate follow on activities into the strategic plans and annual workplans of EGILAT and SCCP to continue and deepen collaboration between customs/law enforcement practitioners, including fostering the growth and use of the Customs Points of Contact Network.

·  Organizers to strengthen and potentially formalize working ties with related multinational actors such as INTERPOL Project LEAF, UNODC, WCO, etc.

·  Explore opportunities for holding a regular meeting/event (e.g., every two years), or periodic meetings between EGILAT and SCCP, to continue the workshop discussion and advance capacity building by exchanging information, sharing best practices, and providing updates on progress. 

Results and progress will be measured by data collection (prior and post workshop surveys, 6 months and 1 year) against the indicators in question 12, among other metrics, to track impact and follow up actions, and to inform future intervention under this and related areas.

Project Overseers

PO #1:
Mr. Luke Thompson
Foreign Affairs Officer, Forest Division, Office of Conservation and Water
Bureau of Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs
US Department of State

In addition to subject matter policy expertise in illegal logging and associated trade, Mr. Thompson has multiple years of experience in project and contract management which will enable execution of this workshop, including logistics, subcontracting, scheduling, etc. 

PO #2:
Mr. Bill McElnea
Director, Environment and Natural Resources
Office of the U.S. Trade Representative

Cost Efficiency

Not Applicable.

Drawdown Timetable

Not Applicable.

Direct Labour

APEC Funded Positions

Duties

Total Hours

Speakers

The Project Overseer seeks APEC funding to support 8 speakers in total for the two-day Dialogue.

128 hours/two full days

Contractor

Contractor will coordinate all event logistics, speaker and participant travel, finalize agenda, take notes during the event, as well as lead the development and finalization of the written output: the Best Practices Resource Tool, including the two follow up survey exercises. (544 hours)

544

Waivers

Waiver

Justification

Waiver for advance payment

Travel airfare, per diem for speakers, active participants - to encourage participation in the project.

Waiver to fund governmental officials from non-travel eligible member economies, non-APEC members and representatives of international organizations as speakers for airfare and per diem

Many times even non-travel eligible member economies government officials are subject to budgetary constraints, as well as representatives of international and/or other relevant organizations (as expert speakers).  While in-kind or self-funding will be requested where possible, a waiver on the prohibition of such support will encourage more complete participation and greater likelihood of project success.

Fund 8 speakers for the workshop – per diem and airfare only, as needed.

PO requests for funding of 8 speakers for both days. We need all speakers to stay until the end of the workshop to help compile and develop best practices document output.  This request with justification will be sent to PO in charge during implementation process.

Are there any supporting document attached?

No 
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Version HistoryVersion History

Project No.

Project Title

Project Status

Publication (if any)

Fund Account

Sub-fund

Project Year

Project Session

APEC Funding

Co-funding Amount

Total Project Value

Sponsoring Forum

Topics

Committee

Other Fora Involved

Other Non-APEC Stakeholders Involved

Proposing Economy(ies)

Co-Sponsoring Economies

Expected Start Date

Expected Completion Date

Project Proponent Name 1

Job Title 1

Organization 1

Postal Address 1

Telephone 1

Fax 1

Email 1

Project Proponent Name 2

Job Title 2

Organization 2

Postal Address 2

Telephone 2

Fax 2

Email 2

Declaration

Project Summary

Relevance

Objectives

Alignment

TILF/ASF Justification

Beneficiaries and Outputs

Dissemination

Gender

Work Plan

Risks

Monitoring and Evaluation

Linkages

Sustainability

Project Overseers

Cost Efficiency

Drawdown Timetable

Direct Labour

Waivers

Are there any supporting document attached?

hdFldAdmin

Project Number

Previous Fora

Secretariat Comments

Reprogramming Notes

Consolidated QAF

Endorsement By Fora

PD Sign Off

Batch

Forum Priority

Committee Ranking Category

Committee Priority

PDM Priority

Priority Within Funding Category

Monitoring Report Received

Completion Report Received

PMU Field 1

PMU Field 2

PMU Field 3

On Behalf Of

Proposal Status

Originating Sub-Forum

Approval Status
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