Project Title

Strengthening APEC Cooperation on Food Security and Climate Change 

Project Year

2016   

Project Number

PPFS 03 2016A 

Project Session

Session 2   

Project Type

Standard 

Project Status

Project in Implementation   
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Project No.

PPFS 03 2016A 

Project Title

Strengthening APEC Cooperation on Food Security and Climate Change 

Project Status

Project in Implementation 

Publication (if any)

 

Fund Account

APEC Support Fund 

Sub-fund

ASF: General Fund 

Project Year

2016 

Project Session

Session 2 

APEC Funding

90,000 

Co-funding Amount

80,000 

Total Project Value

170,000 

Sponsoring Forum

Policy Partnership on Food Security (PPFS) 

Topics

Food Security 

Committee

SOM Steering Committee on Economic and Technical Cooperation (SCE) 

Other Fora Involved

 

Other Non-APEC Stakeholders Involved

 

Proposing Economy(ies)

United States 

Co-Sponsoring Economies

Australia; Canada; Japan; Papua New Guinea; Peru; Viet Nam 

Expected Start Date

01/01/2017 

Expected Completion Date

31/12/2017 

Project Proponent Name 1

Anushree Banerjee (new PO wef 17 February 2017) 

Job Title 1

Foreign Affairs Officer, Office of Global Food Security 

Organization 1

US Department of State 

Postal Address 1

Not Applicable 

Telephone 1

1-202 6475916 

Fax 1

Not Applicable 

Email 1

banerjeea@state.gov 

Project Proponent Name 2

Mark Manis (new co-PO) and Nadira Mailewa 

Job Title 2

Senior Policy Advisor / Human Security and Economic Specialist 

Organization 2

US Department of Agriculture / US-ATAARI 

Postal Address 2

Not Applicable 

Telephone 2

1-202 7201743 / 65-68919658 

Fax 2

Not Applicable 

Email 2

mark.manis@usda.gov / NMailewa@nathaninc.com 

Declaration

Anushree Banerjee, Mark Manis and Nadira Mailewa 

Project Summary

Climate change will have a profound impact on food security in every APEC economy. This project seeks to address the multi-faceted implications of  climate change for food security in the APEC region by:

- building the capacity of APEC economies on adaptation and, where possible, mitigation measures while sustainably increasing productivity and incomes through sharing of best practices, effective policy approaches and lessons learned;

- improving policy coherence and coordination between sectors involved food security to create an enabling environment which can support  measures in APEC economies on food security and climate change; and

- strengthening information and technology sharing platforms, enhancing communication and coordination efforts relating to the agriculture and aquaculture/fisheries sectors.

These objectives will be achieved through targeted, well designed, demand driven capacity building activities which will be aligned under the four strategic pillars of the multi-year APEC Program on Food Security and Climate Change.

Relevance

Relevance – APEC: Climate change will have a profound impact on agriculture, aquaculture, and fisheries in every APEC economy. Climate change is expected to disrupt availability of and access to food around the world, while also posing risks to other critical elements of global food systems, including processing, storage, transportation, and consumption. 

The effects of climate change are expected to vary across and within economies, but entail a multitude of potential problems including, but not limited to: changes in temperature variation and growing seasons that negatively impact production; more frequent and more intense weather-related disasters such as drought, hurricanes, and floods; rise in sea-level that decreases arable land or makes land less arable due to salinization; increase strain on natural resources, especially water supplies, which are already severely depleted across the region; increase pest and disease outbreaks that affect the food supply;  and increase acidification and temperature variations in the oceans which will impact availability and distribution of fish stocks. 

The Asia-Pacific region accounts for half of the world’s cereal production and up to 40% of its trade volume. Sustainable aquaculture and fisheries are also an important facet of food production within the region with APEC members accounting for over 80% of global aquaculture production and more than 65% of the world’s capture fisheries. Adverse weather conditions and environmental changes could impact food supply by asserting downward pressure on production and upward pressure on prices, thereby creating problems for food availability and affordability. The Asian Development Bank (ADB) and the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) estimate that rice prices could be 29-37 percent higher, wheat prices 81-102 percent higher, maize prices 58-97 percent higher, and soybean prices 14-49 percent higher in 2050 compared to a no-climate change scenario. 

Global discourse on food security and climate change has focused on ways to avoid and manage the negative impacts of climate change on food security and ecosystems. With agriculture representing 13 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions, efforts to address the food security-climate relationship has also focused on reducing greenhouse gas emissions, where possible, from food production. Although international discussions on such approaches refer to various terms such as “climate-smart agriculture” (CSA), “climate resilient”, and “environmentally sustainable” food security, these terms generally align in substance. The FAO definition of CSA, the terminology that APEC has been using for working purposes, covers both terrestrial agriculture and aquatic-based food supplies and encompasses the three pillars of: 

1) sustainably increasing agricultural productivity and incomes;

2) adapting and building resilience to climate change (“adaptation”); and

3) mitigating or removing greenhouse gas emissions where possible (“mitigation”). 

The project aims to improve the capacity of APEC economies on CSA, through promoting a coordinated regional effort at addressing climate change-related challenges on food security. This will involve a holistic effort that supports increases in knowledge and awareness of climate change adaptation and mitigation measures as well as approaches to sustainably increase agricultural productivity and incomes. The project will leverage efforts that have already been undertaken in this space within APEC, and examine ways of further strengthening existing technical, policy and institutional frameworks to scale up policies and practices to address the complex challenges of food security and climate change relevant to the agriculture, aquaculture, and fisheries sectors. The specific activities to be implemented in economies in the region will be based on identified capacity gaps and reflect the need for differing approaches due to the diverse contexts, priorities, and capacities within each economy, and respect the regulatory and legal frameworks of each economy. 

Relevance: Rank: This proposal directly links to Funding Criteria Rank# 1: Food production, processing, supply chain and trade, including food safety and security, sustainable agriculture, sustainability of these activities and rural development, technical cooperation and new technologies, as well as implementation of the Food Security Roadmap Towards 2020. As the proposed CSA approaches encompass fisheries and aquaculture, the project also aligns with Rank#1 criteria associated with ocean related issues. In addition, the project fits under Rank#2 as it supports the “Sustainable Growth” pillar of the APEC Strategy for Strengthening Quality Growth.

Objectives

The overall goal of the project is to increase sustainable food productivity and food security in the APEC region in response to climate change. The goal will be achieved through the following objectives:

- building the capacity of APEC economies on adaptation and, where possible, mitigation measures while sustainably increasing productivity and incomes through sharing of best practices, effective policy approaches and lessons learned;

- improving policy coherence and coordination between sectors involved food security to create an enabling environment which can support  measures in APEC economies on food security and climate change; and

- strengthening information and technology sharing platforms, enhancing communication and coordination efforts relating to the agriculture and aquaculture sectors.

- involving the participation of communities, associations and private sector.

The objectives will be achieved through targeted, demand driven capacity building activities which will be aligned under the four strategic pillars set forth by the Piura Declaration under the Framework for the Multi-year APEC Program on Food Security and Climate Change, which was agreed to by members during the APEC Ministerial Meeting on Food Security in September 2016. Going forward, APEC economies will pursue cooperation on food security and climate change under the banner of the APEC Program on Food Security and Climate Change (APFSCC).

The capacity building initiatives supported under the project may involve a mix of policy dialogue and APEC-wide workshops focusing on specific thematic or technical areas. This may include, inter alia, aquaculture and risk forecasting, assessment, and management which were identified as priority areas of interest to APEC economies at the self-funded APEC workshop undertaken in July 2016 and the APEC Climate Symposium held in September 2016.

Alignment

The project responds to the directions set by APEC Ministers at the 2010 Ministerial Meeting on Food Security (Niigata Declaration), to “work together to assist the agriculture sector to adapt to and mitigate, climate change through the development and transfer of new and existing technologies, exchange of information, research collaboration and capacity building…” The project also seeks to deliver on commitments made under the APEC High Level Policy Dialogue on Food Security and Blue Economy Plan of Action. In addition, it aligns strongly with the 2012 Kazan Declaration as well as the 2014 Beijing Declaration on Food Security which stated: “the increasingly urgent need to adapt agricultural systems to climate change and help agricultural communities become more resilient to droughts and floods, especially for smallholders”. 

The scope of the project supports the objective 4 of the APEC Food Security Business Plan (2014-2020) and the goals of the APEC Food Security Road Map Towards 2020 aimed at “promoting agricultural production practices that assist in adapting to and mitigating the impacts of climate change”. This project also reflects Peru’s host year priorities, specifically the climate change component under the “food markets” theme. In addition this activity also reflects Vietnam's host year priorities, which will include the topic of food security and climate change, underscored by its intent to host a High-Level Policy Dialogue on the issue during APEC Food Security Week in 2017.This work builds on discussions on food security and climate change undertaken at the PPFS-1 meeting in May 2016 and more recent discussions at the Food Security Week in Piura. Most importantly this project is aligned with the strategic directions set forth under the Piura Declaration that was issued by the APEC Food Security Ministerial Meeting in September 2016, which will be implemented under the banner of the APFSCC. 

Furthermore, the project reflects the outcomes of the self-funded APEC workshop conducted in June 2016, which served as important event to help define the components of the APEC multi-year initiative on food security and climate change. It also reflects the outcomes of the APEC Climate Symposium of September 2016.

TILF/ASF Justification

According to the Asian Development Bank, climate change will have a profound impact on food security in every APEC economy with developing economies facing some of the largest reductions in food production potential. Over the past decade, most developing economies have been affected by extreme weather events – including droughts, floods and cyclones – that have impacted food production, a trend that experts predict will intensify due to climate change. In 2015, the region experienced the hottest year in recorded history, while a resurgent El Nino cycle has underscored the impact that extreme weather patterns could have on food availability and affordability through decreased production and upward pressure on prices. Given this, the scope of this project is highly relevant to developing economy members in the Asia Pacific region.

The project will aim to build the capacity of APEC economies, particularly developing economies, to improve climate change adaptation measures and promote resilience to effectively manage and mitigate the adverse impacts of climate change as they relate to food security, through sharing of best practices, effective policy approaches and lessons learned. We anticipate that developing economy participants will not only benefit from exposure to what has worked in developed economy contexts and globally (which will be discussed at the workshop), but also get the opportunity to showcase examples of good policies, practices and activities undertaken in their own economies which would have the potential to be replicated in other economies. Finally, the project related events will provide an opportunity for developing economy participants to enhance or establish networks with resource experts engaged in the events supported under this project.

Beneficiaries and Outputs

Outputs: As noted above, this project would be implemented under the APEC Program on Food Security and Climate Change which was approved at the APEC Ministerial Meeting on Food Security in Piura, Peru in September 2016. Specifically, the project outputs will be aligned under its four strategic themes:

·  Cooperation on food security and climate change policy

·  Cooperation on best practices

·  Technology dissemination and knowledge sharing

·  Human capacity building and outreach 

The Project will involve the completion of two workshops which focus on building the capacity of APEC economies to improve climate change adaptation measures and promote resilience to effectively mitigate the adverse impacts of climate change. This will be undertaken through sharing of best practices, effective policy approaches and lessons learned. The specific content of the workshops will be informed by a broader policy dialogue on the relationship between climate change and food security nexus undertaken at PPFS -1 2017 and other APEC fora meetings including OFWG, ACTWG and PPSTI. Most importantly, the content of the capacity building workshops will also leverage work undertaken by APEC as well as by other multilateral fora in the region such as ASEAN and the UNDP. 

The first workshop would be implemented in the first quarter of 2017, and build on discussions from the 2016 APEC Climate Symposium in Piura, Peru (September 2016) and the APEC Policy Dialogue on Food Security and Climate Change in Ho Chi Minh City Vietnam (June 2016). Emphasis will be placed on coordinating between the agriculture and aquaculture/fisheries sectors, promoting capabilities that are critical for achieving effective adaptation of the food supply to climate and to address major gaps that exist among many APEC member economies. Topics may include examining available risk assessment and decision-making tools, information and decision-making needs of producers, and institutional capacity building needs to improve intra-governmental coordination across relevant ministries and between the public and private sectors. 

The second workshop would occur during APEC Food Security Week in Vietnam in August 2017. The workshop would build on the first workshop but include more emphasis on human capacity building, looking at ways to better facilitate communication of information from governments to the field-level (and vice versa) and to improve training and extension services on food security and climate change. Communications and training is fundamental to ensure adoption of practices and timely, effective decision-making in the face of climate-risks to the food supply. Utilizing the location of APEC Food Security Week in the Mekong River Delta region, which is seeing severe impact climate impacts on food production, the workshop would highlight pilot projects and experiences in Vietnam as well as in the broader the APEC region. Discussions are envisioned to explore various models for training and extension (for example “climate hubs”, CGIAR’s climate smart villages in Vietnam, internet-based “virtual” extension, farmer-to-farmer extension, etc.), tools for communicating CSA information and practices, and private sector activities and experiences on training. 

An addition output which will include the establishment of a network of technical experts who will be able to enhance existing networks and support APEC’s ongoing food security work. 

Outcomes: The expected goal of this project include improved policies and practices to improve food productivity and food security within the APEC region. The two workshops will provide the opportunity for participants to share information about innovative practices and effective systems established in economies in the region to address the challenges of climate change and implications for agriculture and aquaculture. 

To achieve the expected outcomes from this project the POs will target high level policy and technical staff who have clear roles and responsibilities within relevant ministries, departments and line agencies in APEC economies that deal with agriculture, aquaculture/fisheries, food and climate change related issues. A central desired outcome is increased knowledge of participants of innovative practices, decision-making tools, lessons learned and effective policy approaches to mitigate and adapt to the adverse impacts of climate change on the agriculture and aquaculture sectors in the APEC region.

In addition, the expected outcomes also include improved policy coherence and coordination within and between sectors to create an effective enabling environment to support effective climate change adaptation and mitigation measures. The project will also aim to promote information and technology sharing, enhancing stronger dialogue and coordination and cooperation efforts within key agencies (ministries, departments and line agencies) to address climate change impacts.

Where possible, the content of the workshop will aim to showcase good practice examples of policy approaches or systems implemented through effective pilot programs in the region which could be replicated in similar context. In this regard, the workshops will aim to promote effective peer-to-peer learning between individuals, institutions, and economies, and support the engagement by experts from CGAIR, academia, and multilateral agencies such as IFPRI, World Food Programme (WFP), the Food Agriculture Organization (FAO), ASEAN, the World Bank, and the Asian Development Bank. 

Beneficiaries: To ensure that the workshops achieve the anticipated capacity building outcomes, the Project Overseers (POs) will develop selection criteria to identify appropriate policy and technical officials from APEC economies that work on  food security (including agriculture and aquaculture/fisheries) and/or climate change areas. The selection criteria will be developed during project implementation and included in the nomination/invitations to be sent out to APEC economies. POs will also place emphasis on having a well-balanced mix of participants from the private sector and academia who have specific expertise in the area of climate change mitigation and adaptation efforts as it relates to the food and agriculture (and aquaculture) sectors. 

Direct beneficiaries include APEC officials, policy makers, and subject matter experts from relevant agencies and organizations working on climate change issues related to food, agriculture and aquaculture/fisheries sectors. The indirect beneficiaries include members of the public; including small-holder farmers, fishers, researchers and academics, and food and agriculture businesses. 

This activity will also have benefits for women, who are food producers and consumers. As the subject matter cuts across a range of sectors, nominations for the workshops will be sent to all relevant APEC fora, including OFWG, ACTWG and PPSTI.

Dissemination

Project outputs including presentation materials will be distributed to the participants and other stakeholders, electronically. Soft copies of all documentation will be uploaded onto the project website and APEC database to be easily accessible by members.  The workshop outputs will be reported at the PPFS plenary meetings and relevant forum meetings. There is no intention to sell outputs arising from this project.

Gender

Women play a key role in the agriculture sector, as agriculture producers and as consumers. As producers, the impacts of climate change are closely connected with women’s overall quality of life in terms of agricultural livelihoods (including generation of income) and access to food. Women also play a key role as effective agents of change in relation to climate change adaptation, mitigation as well as disaster reduction strategies in developing economies.  In addition to this, women’s’ responsibilities in households and communities make them well equipped to develop sustainable livelihood strategies adapted to climate change realities, particularly in developing economies. In this context, the objectives of the project benefit women. 

The PO’s acknowledge the importance of engaging women as policy makers, technical subject matter experts and practitioners to ensure that gender issues are sufficiently addressed during project implementation. The following steps will be taken by the POs to ensure the effective participation and engagement of both men and women in project activities:

-  The invitations will specify the important role played by women in promoting agricultural productivity and food security in the APEC region and globally, and strongly encourage the active participation of women during the workshop to ensure that gender issues are adequately addressed;

-  The workshop agenda will cover specific gender issues as they relate to the climate change-food security nexus, including women’s economic opportunities;

-  Ensure a good gender balance in the interactive group sessions or discussions during project implementation; and

-  Ensure a good gender balance when selecting speakers/experts for the workshop.

Work Plan

The project will include a mix of policy dialogues and APEC wide workshops. All APEC members will be invited through the standard nomination process.  Private sector and non-government actors will be invited through a separate process which targets relevant agencies, think tanks and academic institutions. 

The key milestones involved in the implementation of this project are detailed below:

December 2016: BMC approval of the project proposal. Following this, the POs will liaise with APEC economies to make decision on the venue and scope of the proposed workshops.

January 2017:  Define the scope of the activities further and draft the agenda, speaker invitations for the first workshop. Identify key experts and speakers.

March: Conduct first workshop following SOM1 – timing to be determined once dates for SOM have been confirmed.

May 2017: Conduct policy discussions to firm up the scope of the second workshop under the project. Disseminate report from first workshop.

June 2017:  Draft the agenda and invitations. Identify experts. Send out nominations to economies.

July 2017: Finalise the arrangements and select venues in Viet Nam, etc.

August 2017: Conduct the second workshop on the margins of the Food Security Meetings in Can Tho.

September 2017: Update members on outcomes of the workshops. Disseminate report from second workshop.

Risks

The broader topic of climate change and agriculture-food security nexus has been discussed during PPFS plenary meetings as well as in past workshops and as such, there is much interest in APEC economies, particularly developing economies including Viet Nam, Peru and PNG in progressing this work.

Perceived risks during implementation are detailed in the table below:

Risk

Mitigation Strategy

Limited interest by economies

The project is designed to benefit all APEC economies particularly developing economies, and therefore there sufficient incentive for economies to engage in this activity during planning and implementation. As this event is strongly aligned under the broad directions of the framework for Multi-year APEC Program on Food Security and Climate Change, the risk of there being limited interest by some APEC economies to progress this work, is minimal. To mitigate any potential risks relating to this, the PO will ensure that information about the project (timing/scope) is disseminated well ahead of the proposed workshops. Furthermore, the PO will undertake bilateral discussions with key economies where possible to make sure that relevant policy and technical officers are informed of the work that is undertaken. Results will be disseminated to all APEC economies.

Possibility for scheduling conflicts with other APEC events

The Project Overseers will liaise with host economy representatives (including the SOM office) to ensure that project activities don’t conflict with events that are undertaken by other economies or external stakeholders on similar topics.

Lack of participants with relevant skills and expertise

Project Overseers will develop selection criteria to be included in the nomination forms to ensure that the participants have the relevant skills and experience to participate/engage effectively in the scope of the project activities. In addition to this, POs will check the nominations received to ensure that the nominees from economies fit the criteria.

Monitoring and Evaluation

In the immediate term, the impacts of the project in terms of increases in knowledge and awareness of key concepts relating to climate change impacts on agriculture and food security, will be measured during project implementation, through both baseline and end line/post event surveys. 

The longer term impacts of the project will be measured using outcome indicators. These may include increases in the numbers of policies and practices established on a voluntary, non-binding basis in APEC economies as a direct result of the project, increased opportunities for regional cooperation on addressing the food security-climate change relationship, number of policy dialogues held within and between economies etc. These impacts will be captured and measured through an ex-ante evaluation which will be conducted one year after the completion of activities (via a survey of participants). Basic indicators (process indicators) to measure the initiative’s success in terms of delivery of activities in time and on budget will be developed during the proposal implementation stages. Specific timelines will be established by the PO to ensure that each of the key tasks relating to the planning and implementation stages of the project are undertaken in a timely manner. During the planning phase the POs will work closely with the related Program Director and Program Executive to ensure alignment with APEC guidelines. 

Data disaggregated by gender will be collated to ensure that impacts on women are measured and monitored – this will include the number of participants as well as the number of technical experts engaged as speakers and experts. This information will be reported through the APEC process – via APEC Monitoring and Completion reports.

Linkages

APEC’s efforts to address the food security-climate change nexus will be led by PPFS in line with the directions of the overarching framework of the multi-year APEC Program on Food Security and Climate Change. As the topic cuts across several sectors, this activity will be undertaken in close collaboration with other APEC fora including ATCWG and OFWG, as well as PPSTI. This provides strong opportunities for cross-fora collaboration. The Project Overseers will ensure that potential risks of duplication with other APEC and regional initiatives, will be mitigated through effective dialogue and continuing engagement with key stakeholders. 

Representatives of key international organizations such as the FAO, WFP, CGIAR, IFPI, IRRI, World Bank, ADB and regional organizations such as ASEAN, and PIF as well as representatives of think tanks such as the Climate Institute and the APEC Climate Centre (APCC) which are active in this space, will be engaged to provide technical inputs into the events. It is anticipated that experts from these organizations would be engaged as speakers and facilitators. Engagement with these non-APEC actors will ensure that APEC’s work in this space complements the work undertaken outside APEC and any risks of duplication of effort can be minimized. 

This activity builds on previous projects undertaken under the ATCWG, PPSTI and the Energy Working Group on climate change in the Asia Pacific region. This project is informed by the outputs of a previous self-funded project titled “Policy Forum: Towards an APEC Partnership on Climate Change and Food Security”, which was implemented in July 2016, as well as the APEC Climate Symposium implemented by Korea and the APCC in September 2016.

Sustainability

The project aims to improve the capacity of APEC economies to promote food security and effectively manage and mitigate the risks of climate change, through promoting a coordinated regional effort at addressing climate change-related challenges on the agriculture and aquaculture sectors. As noted above, the project is strongly aligned with the strategic directions of the APEC Program on Food Security and Climate Change. APFSCC is expected to be implemented by a coordination group which reflects cross fora collaboration among PPFS, ATCWG, OFWG, and other relevant APEC working groups. After the completion of this project it is anticipated that the broader APEC framework will provide a useful platform to continue dialogue with APEC members on the topic and examine ways of leveraging the work undertaken under the project – this will ensure sustainability of the outcomes. It is also anticipated that the project outcomes will inform the directions of the three year Action Plan which is expected to be completed by the last quarter of 2017. 

In addition, as part of the monitoring and evaluation approach established by the Project Overseers for this project, a follow up survey will be undertaken one year after project completion to find out the extent to which the knowledge acquired by participants through the capacity building efforts have led to the development of/improvements of existing policies and practices relating to climate change mitigation and adaptation measures and sustainably increasing agricultural productivity and incomes.

Project Overseers

Mr. Rock Cheung is the Policy Advisor for Asia and the Pacific at the Office of Global Food Security and will serve as the overall Project Overseer (PO). Mr. Cheung has a strong background in food security, Asia-Pacific economic affairs, and multilateral diplomacy and an in depth knowledge of APEC having worked on a range of APEC initiatives since 2007, which included serving as Project Overseer of the 2011 Secure Trade in the Asia-Pacific Region (STAR) Conference. The second PO is Nadira Mailewa who has well developed project management skills and a sound knowledge of APEC policies and project processes.

Cost Efficiency

Not Applicable.

Drawdown Timetable

Not Applicable.

Direct Labour

We will be seeking APEC funds to contract two Vietnamese support staff to assist with workshop implementation. The estimated cost is $4788.00. APEC procurement guidelines will be followed in selecting and contracting the staff.

Waivers

Not Applicable.

Are there any supporting document attached?

No 
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Project No.

Project Title

Project Status

Publication (if any)

Fund Account

Sub-fund

Project Year

Project Session

APEC Funding

Co-funding Amount

Total Project Value

Sponsoring Forum

Topics

Committee

Other Fora Involved

Other Non-APEC Stakeholders Involved

Proposing Economy(ies)

Co-Sponsoring Economies

Expected Start Date

Expected Completion Date

Project Proponent Name 1

Job Title 1

Organization 1

Postal Address 1

Telephone 1

Fax 1

Email 1

Project Proponent Name 2

Job Title 2

Organization 2

Postal Address 2

Telephone 2

Fax 2

Email 2

Declaration

Project Summary

Relevance

Objectives

Alignment

TILF/ASF Justification

Beneficiaries and Outputs

Dissemination

Gender

Work Plan

Risks

Monitoring and Evaluation

Linkages

Sustainability

Project Overseers

Cost Efficiency

Drawdown Timetable

Direct Labour

Waivers

Are there any supporting document attached?

hdFldAdmin

Project Number

Previous Fora

Secretariat Comments

Reprogramming Notes

Consolidated QAF

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PD Sign Off

Batch

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Monitoring Report Received

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