Project Title

Challenges for Water and Food Security, in a Context of Climate Change in the APEC Region 

Project Year

2016   

Project Number

PPFS 02 2016 

Project Session

Session 2   

Project Type

Standard 

Project Status

Project in Implementation   
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Project No.

PPFS 02 2016 

Project Title

Challenges for Water and Food Security, in a Context of Climate Change in the APEC Region 

Project Status

Project in Implementation 

Publication (if any)

 

Fund Account

General Project Account 

Sub-fund

None 

Project Year

2016 

Project Session

Session 2 

APEC Funding

164,603 

Co-funding Amount

5,300 

Total Project Value

169,903 

Sponsoring Forum

Policy Partnership on Food Security (PPFS) 

Topics

Food Security 

Committee

SOM Steering Committee on Economic and Technical Cooperation (SCE) 

Other Fora Involved

Oceans and Fisheries Working Group (OFWG) 

Other Non-APEC Stakeholders Involved

 

Proposing Economy(ies)

Peru 

Co-Sponsoring Economies

Australia; Canada; Chile; Indonesia; Japan; New Zealand; Singapore; Chinese Taipei; Thailand; United States; Viet Nam 

Expected Start Date

01/12/2016 

Expected Completion Date

31/12/2017 

Project Proponent Name 1

Jorge Fidel Castro Trkovic 

Job Title 1

General Director for Agricultural Policies 

Organization 1

Ministry of Agriculture and Irrigation 

Postal Address 1

258 Yauyos Street, Lima 1, Peru 

Telephone 1

51-1 2098800 Extension 4226 

Fax 1

Not Applicable 

Email 1

jcastro@minagri.gob.pe; cramirez@minagri.gob.pe 

Project Proponent Name 2

Not Applicable 

Job Title 2

Not Applicable 

Organization 2

Not Applicable 

Postal Address 2

Not Applicable 

Telephone 2

Not Applicable 

Fax 2

Not Applicable 

Email 2

Not Applicable 

Declaration

Jorge Fidel Castro Trkovic 

Project Summary

Climate change has a direct impact on water supply that could affect food production, posing economic growth limitations and creating social conflict. This is compounded by a weak water governance in some economies, thus the sustainable use of water resources must be improved to ensure food security and to implement effective climate change adaptation measures. We propose to organize the first APEC meeting of authorities responsible for water resources management and food security experts, in order to strengthen the relationship and future cooperation between the authorities, experts, private sector and academia. Discussion and research will focus on identifying gaps on water resources management and developing governance strategies, as well as sharing best practices/experiences on water use for food security.

Two key deliverables of the project include: 1. Improve understanding of the water and food security nexus, 2. Develop a Guideline on regulations, institutional arrangements and best practices in this matter.

Relevance

Relevance - APEC: Water is the primary medium through which climate change will impact the development of people, ecosystems and economies.[1] Many of the APEC economies are highly vulnerable to this impact due to structural problems such as poverty and - besides - many of them present characteristics of vulnerability recognized by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC): low-lying coastal areas; arid and semi-arid regions; areas liable to floods, drought and desertification; and fragile mountainous ecosystems. Furthermore, the current global population of 7 billion people is anticipated to increase to more than 9 billion by 2050, that means 60% more food will be needed and agricultural water consumption may increase by 19% (including both rained and irrigated)[2], moreover, it’s estimated that agriculture use represents approximately 70% of the global freshwater supply[3]. To respond to these challenges, water use efficiency measures must be adopted and scaled up.

Food and agriculture makes a substantial economic contribution to most economies in the APEC region, including manual labor, trade and markets, industry and sustainable rural development. On the other hand, agriculture is also contributing a significant share of the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that are causing climate change – 17% directly through agricultural activities and an additional 7% to 14% through land use changes[4]. Climate change is exacerbating the challenges faced by the agriculture sector, negatively affecting both crop and livestock systems. Therefore, food and agriculture must be central to regional efforts to adapt to climate change, through policies and actions that reduce vulnerabilities and risks and promote agricultural systems that are resilient and sustainable[5]. In this connection, it has been recognized that one of the most important ways to enhance resilience to climate change, is through integrated water resources management (IWRM), which “promotes the coordinated development and management of water, land and related resources in order to maximize economic and social welfare in an equitable manner without compromising the sustainability of vital ecosystems”[6]. Strengthening institutions, integrating policies, encouraging investments, and the promotion of green and gray infrastructure[7] as well as facilitating access to better information about water resources and climate, are key to overcome this challenge. These conditions are the best way to achieve the cross –sectoral integration (2nd Dublin Principle, 1992) by allowing a participatory approach, involving users, planners and policy-makers at all levels and for all the different uses for the water.

Relevance – Rank: The APEC 2016 Funding Criteria taken into account for this project are:

Rank 1: Food production, processing, supply chain and trade, including food safety and security, sustainable agriculture, rural development, technical cooperation and new technologies, as well as implementation of the Food Security Roadmap Towards 2020 and the Food security Business Plan. As water resources involve fisheries and aquaculture, the project also aligns with the Ocean‐related issues for economic growth.

Rank 2: Sustainable Growth: sustainable management of natural resources like water, Innovative Growth: innovation policy and harnessing new technologies for the future, Economic Growth: through the improvement of supply chain and trade.


[1] Sadoff, Claudia and Muller, Mike (2009). Water Management, water security and Climate Change adaptation: Early impacts and essential reports. Stockholm: Global Water Partnership (GWP).

[2] UN Water (2012). World Water Development Report 2012.

[3]  FAO (2009). How to Feed the World in 2050.

[4] OECD (2015). Trade and Agriculture Directorate

[5] FAO (2016). The State of Food and Agriculture: Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security.

[6] GWP (2000). Integrated Water Resources Management. TAC background paper # 4. Stockholm: Global Water Partnership.

[7] FAO (2011). Watershed management: Green infrastructures (GI) are areas covered with trees, shrubs, and grass; GI – also called “soft” - is porous, allowing water to soak into soil which naturally filters pollutants before entering rivers. Gray infrastructures are areas of buildings, roads, utilities, and parking lots. It – also called “hard” infrastructure - is impervious, forcing water to runoff and which must be managed and cleaned before entering rivers.

Objectives

1) Improve the understanding and awareness of policymakers, authorities and the private sector on integrated water resources management for food security, and develop capacities to manage the effects of climate change.

2) Identify and map out key stakeholders responsible for managing water resources for food security in APEC member economies and recognize their roles and responsibilities to strengthen their relationship and enhance the role of international cooperation, through an efficient network on water issues for food security in the region.

3) Identify the water governance and management gaps among APEC economies in order to make effective and sustainable use of water resources for food security.

4) Share and exchange successful expertise, best practices and knowledge (including revalorizing local and traditional practices), learned lessons as well as spread the effectiveness of innovative technologies to overcome and shorten the gaps identified and develop policy’s recommendations.

Alignment

Food Security Roadmap towards 2020: “ensuring sustainable management of natural resources such as land and water” as Plan of activities towards 2020.

Food Security Business Plan (2014-2020): “sustainable development of agriculture & fisheries” - O4: “Promote sustainable management of natural resources, increase resilience to natural disasters & global climate change”.

2012 APEC Leaders’ Declaration: “look for ways to mitigate the effects of agriculture on climate change and support efficient and sustainable use of agricultural and natural resources, in particular, land, forests, water and biodiversity”.

2013 APEC Leaders’ Declaration: “address the nexus of water, energy and food security through the promotion of integrated policies and collaborative approaches”.

APEC Declarations on Food Security:

2016 Piura Declaration: “We encourage economies to share best practices in water use and governance, considering multi-sectoral and multi-level perspectives. We will foster APEC cooperation for the sustainable use and the integrated management of water resources.” (para 27)

-  Annex I: Framework for Multi-Year APEC Program on Food Security and Climate Change.

2014 Beijing Declaration: “We recognize the importance of enhancing the assessment of the impacts of climate change and natural disasters”

2010 Niigata Declaration: “We also agreed to address natural resource challenges such as growing water scarcity, expanding desertification, increasing farmland conversion, diminishing biodiversity, degraded tropical forests and depleted marine fishery resources.”

TILF/ASF Justification

Not Applicable.

Beneficiaries and Outputs

Outputs:                                                                     

- One preliminary overview paper/report on water resource management in the APEC region, based on the information gathering received from economies in the first survey, it include a first draft compilation of the list of stakeholders/agencies identified in the APEC region.

- The First APEC Water Resource Authorities Meeting will be held on the margins of 2017 PPFS2 in Viet Nam, as a regional effort to cope with negative impact of climate change on water supply and food security. It looks forward to giving technical presentations, dissemination of identified best practices and knowledge identified, and presenting the results and findings of the research. The meeting would include water resource authorities and food security and water experts.

- Develop a Guideline on regulations, institutional arrangements and best practices on food security and integrated water resource management for food security. The document will include recommendations and best practices for the policy makers, authorities, producers and private sectors on how to build governance in order to overcome and shorten the water resources management gaps identified. The Guideline will reflect the need for differing approaches due to the diverse contexts, priorities, and capacities within each economy and throughout the region.

- The project will provide research of evidence based practices and also successful experiences in which water management as adaptive measure for climate change.

- The project will then consolidate meeting notes, gather participants’ feedback and reviews, and prepare a report on improved water management mechanisms for sustainable food security, as a guideline for the relevant stakeholders, which includes a set of recommendations.

- Provision of inputs to the Asia Pacific Information Platform on Food Security[1] (APIP-APEC) by sharing the identified key findings, contact information, climate and water resources information, best practices and lessons learned from individuals, agencies and organizations on integrated water resource management. This may strengthen, enrich and update the platform.

Outcomes:

- The project expects to raise awareness and understanding of the integrated water resource management for food security (governance, institutional arrangements and best practices).

- In the medium and long term, the project expects that policymakers, experts, agencies and private sectors from APEC regions - in particular from developing economies - are willing to participate in the sustainable water management projects (that might be result from the cooperation network), and make more efficient technology and knowledge transfer.

- Cooperation network will be enhanced to overcome and shorten gaps in governance and institutional arrangements for integrated water resource management and food security, in particular for developing economies.

- Identifying institutional priorities to facilitate and effectively engage private capital investment into efficient water management projects, in particular for developing economies. It would be useful to feature case studies from the private sector and to attract possible investments and engagements points. Since climate change will impact individual APEC economies in different ways and there is not a one-solution-fits-all options, discussions and outputs from the project will reflect the need for differing approaches according to the diverse contexts, priorities, and capacities within each economy and throughout the region.

- Improving capacity building on IWRM concept in the APEC region, as a process to achieve the interaction and integration between different sectors and uses of water. Since IWRM is a means to achieve water security, in terms of achieving “the reliable availability of an acceptable quantity and quality of water for health, livelihoods and production, coupled with an acceptable level of water-related risks”[2]; this project will emphasize the need to resolve or balance water demands between different sectors, mainly those related with food security. The biggest challenge may be to find mechanisms to address competition between food production, urbanization, industrial water use, aquaculture, environmental need, etc. 

Beneficiaries:

Direct: Authorities and policy makers, agencies or related institutions, that work into water government departments and food security institutions (Agricultural and Aquaculture/Fisheries Sector); researchers, experts and private sector (farm industries, technological firms, extractive industries, aquaculture managers), urban planners; who are involved in water resource and climate risks management.

Indirect: International organizations, academia, rural communities, producers, family farm and farmers/fisher folks.

Potential: ATCWG, OFWG, and SME’s participants. 

Meeting participants: PO will prioritize the participation of Authorities/Executive Directors/Chiefs of agencies or government departments in charge of water issues (and mainly nexus with food security), as well as food security experts. Others participants as policy makers, experts, researches private sector who are involved in water resource and climate risks management.

Participants with experience in developing and promoting innovative water projects mechanisms and integrated water resource management will provide training and experience sharing with other participants – especially family farm leaders- to validate preliminary findings. Likewise, direct participants will be provided with major tools to build better and articulated policies related to integrated water resource management and will be benefited from well-designed water management mechanisms. Indirect and potential participants will be encouraged to suggest policy inputs and recommendations for APEC members to deal with food insecurity. 

Research team: Multidisciplinary people related to water resource and climate risk management, and food security will be necessary to co-build better mechanisms and strategies for water and food security, in a context of climate change in the APEC region. Years of experience, expertise and researcher level will be considered to conform the best team. Researchers may belong to APEC non-members economies.


[1] http://www.apip-apec.com/

[2] Grey, D. and Sadoff, C. (2007). ‘Sink or Swim? Water Security for Growth and Development’ Water Policy 9, No. 6: 545- 571.

Dissemination

- The research report will be featured in Peru´s Ministry of Agriculture and Irrigation, APIP and APEC’s websites for reference and for widespread usage. The project team will also encourage other key institutes and water network that are involved in the project to share the reports on their websites and newsletters.

- Research report will be also presented at PPFS, OFWG, ATCWG, and SOM meetings.

- Hard copies will be provided to all the meeting participants. Electronic publication will also be used to disseminate the workshop documents widely.

- The Guideline, which includes the systematization of experiences, best practices and institutional arrangements will be also distributed by emailing through relevant Program Directors (APEC secretariat), in coordination with PO.

- Engagement with APEC media to organize interviews with experts, in order to maximize the opportunity of meeting authorities, experts and international organization.

- The target audience includes those who directly or indirectly work in the fields of water issues, climate change, food security, natural resources, risk management and environmental issues in APEC member economies. Policy makers, government officials’, academic researchers/ experts, private sector and other stakeholders involved in water management process are the key audience of the research report and meeting.

- One of the dissemination strategies may consider to produce videos of technical experiences, best practices and institutional arrangements; also on-line webinars; in order to improve professional capacities.

There is no intention to sell outputs arising from this project.

Gender

Sustainable Development Goals related to water and food, are unlikely to be achieved unless gender perspectives are integrated into planning and implementation activities[1]. Across the Asia-Pacific region, rural women assume critical roles in attaining each of the pillars of food security: availability, access, and utilization. Their role is thus crucial throughout the agricultural value chain, natural resources use and management, from production on the family plot, to food preparation, to distribution within the household[2]. Water is necessary not only for drinking, food production and preparation, but also for personal hygiene, care of the sick, cleaning, washing and waste disposal. Because of their dependence on water resources, women have accumulated considerable knowledge about water resources, including location, quality and storage methods[3].

-  The project advocates to gender equality in its development and implementation, since we have identified a direct relationship between gender, adaptation to climate change and sustainable development. Both men and women will get equal opportunity to participate in the project later phases, process of preparatory stage, consultation and direct labors, etc.

-  Female leaders will be prioritized and encouraged to be invited as researchers and speakers to the meetings and trainings. We will promote adequate professionals as speakers, especially women policy makers with experience in water management and science-policy in water issues. At least 30% of the speakers will be women.

-  The organizers will disseminate information and invitation to as many women as possible. Among other criteria such as expertise, experiences, contributions to the sector, female leaders will be prioritized to join and be funded to attend the workshops.


[1] International Decade for Action “WATER FOR LIFE” 2005-2015

[2] FAO & ADB (2013). Gender Equality and Food Security

[3] UN Water (2006). Gender, Water and Sanitation. A Policy Brief.

Work Plan

Timeline

Key activity

December 2016 to March 2017

1) Gathering information by PO (first form/survey)

2) Work plan with deadlines

3) Methodological design

4) Preliminary discussion paper and overview (if possible by PPFS1)

5) Preparing terms of reference for contractor services

6) Select consultancy team

7) Starting research

April to May 2017

1) Revision of the methodology and schedule with team research.

2) Identification of thematic APEC authorities and experts for “First Meeting”.

3) First drafting research paper.

June to July 2017

1) First draft agenda for “first meeting”

2) Invitation of authorities, speakers and participants

3) Second drafting research paper

August to September 2017

1) Final Research.

2) First Meeting with authorities and experts (margins of PPFS-2, last week of August 2017)

October to December 2017

Final report of the project to APEC secretariat

Risks

1) Poor quality speakers in the meeting: Selection of good speakers in order to provide informative and useful relevant data: the speakers should be, but not limited to government officials, representatives from the private sector, academic experts, and other relevant organizations. PO will work closely with co-sponsoring economies and other APEC organizations, external researchers to help identifying the most appropriate speakers for experience sharing. The project aims to provide points of views from all stakeholders to lead to unbiased and resilient outcomes. Some criteria will take into consideration: years of experience, membership from recognized water organizations or government departments, among others.

2) Lack of interest and response regarding the preliminary information gathering: Prepare ad hoc, clear and simple forms/survey to recover information from economies. PO will start the process once the project gets approval, direct emailing to contact points and through PD and set deadlines accordingly. In addition, if necessary the invitation would be send to the Ministers/HoD of each economy, in order to get a major engagement. PO will consider collecting information of economies from freely available sources, or to engage with international groups who maintain regional databases.

3) Low interest in participation during the meeting or using results afterwards: PO will deliver a survey on current status of resources and capacities for water management in APEC economies previous the meeting in order to identify and clarify expectations, roles, and desired outcomes.

Participants may not attend the seminar due to lack of funding, thus to encourage its participation, the PO will request a waiver (Budget Note 2) to provide advance payment of travel air fare and per diem for speakers, experts, researchers and active participants. In addition, to ensure proper participation at the Meeting, invitations must be sent well in advance. Also there are other factors that may affect the interests of the participants such as location of the meeting, overlapping of meetings/activities, etc., thus the PO will coordinate closely with the host agency (Viet Nam) to mitigate such risks as well.

4) Delays or untimely preparation: A work plan is set up in monitoring the progress of the project, where the estimated complete date is in December 2017. During each phase of the project, a timeline will be established in guiding and monitoring members’ progress. The PO will also work closely with member economies to ensure timely issuance and collection of invitation, agenda, and meeting materials, and to identify and confirm speakers in order to avoid untimely preparation.

Monitoring and Evaluation

-  A form will be distributed immediately after the project approval in order to recover information related to stakeholders and main areas of interest.

-  First survey conclusion will be send to participants to evaluate the relevance of the outputs for APEC Economies. Second survey, one year after the project completion, will be sent to APEC Economies and participants for monitoring the network.

-  The project will be evaluated by the following indicators:

a) Number of APEC Economies that made available information about integrated water resource management in each economy.

b) Numbers of organizations or agencies related to water resources management to be interviewed (at least 5)

c)  Numbers of innovated mechanisms or successful experiences identified (at least 5)

d) Number of publications made (one final report, one interim report if necessary)

e) Number of participants in the meeting

f) 5 speakers

g) 5 private sector representatives

h) 3 academy representatives

i) Satisfaction rate of participants (more than 75%). 

The project will collect the above information before, at the time of, and after the first meeting. The attendance rate, gender ratio, and participants’ stats will be calculated after the event. Surveys and questionnaires will be sent out to the participant, including the speakers and trainers to collect their feedback of the meeting through free online questionnaire websites.

Linkages

-  Relevant APEC foras such as PPFS, ATCWG, SME, OFWG, FSCF, EWG, PPSTI and the APEC Climate Center as well as the PSU and regional and international organizations (FAO, UNDP, OECD, GWP, ASEAN, IFPRI, CGIAR-WLE and IWMI, among other) will be invited to contribute to the project and may participate in the evaluation process.

-  2016 PPFS Project “Strengthening APEC Cooperation on Food Security and Climate Change”: this project is complementary as it look for increasing knowledge of approaches to addressing challenges related to climate change and food security, as well as to assist developing economies to develop sound policies, strategies and practices to secure sustainable agriculture and aquaculture/fisheries sectors. As IWRM is a recognized effective and adaptive measure for climate change, these projects will create synergies to focus the technical-economic cooperation.

-  APEC Program on Food Security and Climate Change (APEC Piura Declaration – Annex I): the water project is strongly linked with this multi-year program as it may be considered as one of the key activities of the strategic themes that has been set out by the program.

-  Paris Agreement (COP21): It proposes to reach zero emissions of greenhouse gases by 2100, with mitigation and adaptation measures. This agreement commits economies to keep the global earth temperature below 2°C. The project results may contribute that each economy achieves its own commitment in this matter as well as to improve the capacity of adaptation and promotion of greater climate resilience in agriculture and water management.

-  The Sustainable Development Goals for 2030: There is a universal call to action to end poverty, protect the planet and ensure that all people enjoy peace and prosperity. The goals related to the project are: zero hunger (2), climate action (3) and clean water and sanitation (6). The project results may contribute that each economy achieves the SDGs established.

-  OECD Water Governance Programme (2015): Set of rules, practices, and processes through which decisions for the management of water resources and services are taken and implemented. Indicators may be taking into account as reference to develop the research.

-  GWP IWRM ToolBox: free and open database with a library of background papers, policy briefs, technical briefs and perspective papers as well as a huge section of case studies and references. This tool may be a source of information for the research and also may serve for its dissemination. (http://www.gwp.org/ToolBox/).

Sustainability

1)  Promote periodic water resources authorities meetings as part of PPFS work plans, in order to monitoring and evaluate advances, sharing innovative information and discuss new trends in this matter, as well as to strengthen the built cooperation network.

2) The research results might be used for the implementation of the Framework for Multi-Year APEC Program on Food Security and Climate Change.

3) Present a project proposal for trainings or internships on best practices in water management, with particular focus on climate change adaptation (it may be launched at 2017 Project session 2). The selection of samples will be based on the results of this project. Also, the results of the internships may be included in the GWP IWRM Toolbox.

4) Strengthening the information technology systems in water resources and climate change by ad hoc cooperation, in order to recover relevant and good quality data for an effective decision making in middle and long term.

5) Following up with deepening the understanding on water, food and energy security nexus, and build a knowledge management process in this matter. As we know, water is key to produce goods in the field and along the value chain, at the same time, energy is needed to produce and distribute water and food. Global projections indicate that demand for freshwater, energy and food will increase significantly over the next decades under the pressure of population growth and mobility, economic development, international trade, urbanization, diversifying diets, cultural and technological changes, and climate change (Hoff 2011). This nexus is essential for human well-being, poverty reduction and sustainable development, as it presents a conceptual approach to better understand and systematically analyze the interactions between the natural environment and human activities, and to work towards a more coordinated management and use of natural resources across sectors and scales[1].

PO will work with experts and co-sponsors to develop recommendations for concrete and future steps, as mentioned above. These recommendations will be included in the final report, and may be used as input for future projects and studies.


[1] “The Water-Energy-Food Nexus”. FAO (June, 2014)

Project Overseers

Mr Jorge Fidel Castro Trkovic
General Director for Agricultural Policies
Ministry of Agriculture and Irrigation
Peru
Email: jcastro@minagri.gob.pe
cc: cramirez@minagri.gob.pe

Cost Efficiency

Not Applicable.

Drawdown Timetable

Not Applicable.

Direct Labour

Speaker’s Honorarium: For the two-day meeting, 6 speakers will be invited to share their knowledge, case studies and result of the research. 3 speakers will be requested to present a specific methodology to better implement water governance. 

Short-term clerical: Short-term clerical staff will be hired under a contract to organized the logistical arrangements, administrative support of the event and help streamline interventions during the exhibition and participation in the meeting, guide the conversation and make the drafting of the final ideas and systematization oriented objectives of the event. They also do some work such as data compilation, web researching, preparation for the event and other paperwork. 

Contractor fees: One or more consultants will be hired to conduct the research and final guideline report (based in the research).

Waivers

Waiver for advance payment: To encourage participation in the project, the waiver is seek to provide advance payment of travel air fare and per diem for speakers, experts, researchers and active participants. 

Waiver for inviting more experts than requested in Guidebook on APEC Projects: The Project Oversee will make all efforts to contact and invite participants form travel-eligible economies to attend the meeting. In case of less than 15 participants from travel-eligible economies, the Project Oversee requests for adding the number of speakers, experts or researchers accordingly, using the budget of Travel for Participants. The waiver is asked for unexpected change to ensure this project a success.

Are there any supporting document attached?

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Total Project Value

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Topics

Committee

Other Fora Involved

Other Non-APEC Stakeholders Involved

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Expected Start Date

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Organization 1

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Project Summary

Relevance

Objectives

Alignment

TILF/ASF Justification

Beneficiaries and Outputs

Dissemination

Gender

Work Plan

Risks

Monitoring and Evaluation

Linkages

Sustainability

Project Overseers

Cost Efficiency

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Direct Labour

Waivers

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