Project Title

Smart Climate Information and Accountable Actions: Achieving Sustainable Food Security in a Changing World 

Project Year

2016   

Project Number

PPSTI 01 2016 

Project Session

Session 1   

Project Type

Standard 

Project Status

Completed Project   
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Project No.

PPSTI 01 2016 

Project Title

Smart Climate Information and Accountable Actions: Achieving Sustainable Food Security in a Changing World 

Project Status

Completed Project 

Publication (if any)

 

Fund Account

General Project Account 

Sub-fund

None 

Project Year

2016 

Project Session

Session 1 

APEC Funding

120,000 

Co-funding Amount

250,000 

Total Project Value

370,000 

Sponsoring Forum

APEC Policy Partnership on Science, Technology and Innovation (PPSTI) 

Topics

Science and Technology 

Committee

SOM Steering Committee on Economic and Technical Cooperation (SCE) 

Other Fora Involved

 

Other Non-APEC Stakeholders Involved

 

Proposing Economy(ies)

Korea 

Co-Sponsoring Economies

China; Malaysia; Peru; Philippines; Chinese Taipei; Thailand 

Expected Start Date

01/08/2016 

Expected Completion Date

28/02/2017 

Project Proponent Name 1

Sangwon Moon 

Job Title 1

Head, External Affairs Department 

Organization 1

APEC Climate Center 

Postal Address 1

12 Centum 7-ro, Haeundae-gu, Busan 612-020, Korea 

Telephone 1

82-51 7453922 

Fax 1

Not Applicable 

Email 1

swmoon@apcc21.org 

Project Proponent Name 2

Not Applicable 

Job Title 2

Not Applicable 

Organization 2

Not Applicable 

Postal Address 2

Not Applicable 

Telephone 2

Not Applicable 

Fax 2

Not Applicable 

Email 2

Not Applicable 

Declaration

Sangwon Moon 

Project Summary

Understanding the relationship between climate, weather, and large-scale environmental change with agriculture and fisheries is vital for sustainable food security in the APEC region. Recent advances in climate science has enhanced the way that individuals and governments can plan for and manage these sectors, however there are significant gaps in the ability of many APEC economies to produce relevant climate information or translate it into useful decision-making and effective policy. The project will support regional technical cooperation and policy by addressing the impact of climate change on agriculture and regional food security through the hosting of the APEC Climate Symposium 2016 on September 16-18 in Piura, Peru and delivery of supporting activities. It will explore how climate affects agricultural production and investigate how climate information can be employed in finding climate-smart solutions to food insecurity, with a special focus on policy applications. The conference will also feature a panel discussion to wrap-up the symposium and articulate policy recommendations to APEC economies, which will feed directly into the APEC Food Security Week.

Relevance

As industries highly dependent on climate variability, agriculture and fisheries around the world face significant threat from the impacts of climate change. Studies by academics and international organizations such as the Asian Development Bank (ADB) predict that these impacts have the potential to destabilize industries and trigger decreased food security. While the importance of agriculture and global environmental change is widely recognized, there are significant gaps in the policies and technical capacity of many APEC economies to build cross-industry climate resilience or to capitalize on recent advances in climate science.

The project will support regional technical cooperation, strengthen economic resilience, and produce effective policy recommendations by conducting the 2016 APEC Climate Symposium, which will produce sustain benefits for all APEC economies. The symposium will explore how changing climate affects agricultural production and investigate how climate technology can be employed in finding climate-smart agriculture and fishery solutions. It will feature sessions on current challenges for food security, the impacts of both short-term seasonal weather phenomena and large-scale climactic changes on agriculture, long-term solutions for threatened fisheries, and current application challenges to linking climate information with target sectors.

The project is relevant to Rank 1 Projects that demonstrate a direct link to promoting regional economic integration via free and open trade and investment, particularly focused on food production, sustainable agriculture, technical cooperation and new technologies, and, as it feeds directly into the Food Security Week, the implementation of the Food Security Roadmap Towards 2020. Furthermore, through integrating fisheries and aquaculture, it relates to Rank 1 projects focused on ocean-related issues for economic growth. It also relates to Rank 2 Projects that directly support the APEC Leaders’ Growth Strategy, particularly relating to sustainable and innovative growth. Moreover, the project supports the following cross-cutting issues: developing human capital, building linkage between APEC economies, engagement of other APEC fora and other multilateral organizations.

The project builds on previous achievements of the APEC Climate Center (APCC). Established in 2005 through the endorsement of APEC Leaders, APCC has delivered capacity building programs targeted to APEC developing economies through trainings and workshops.

Objectives

The project aims to support the APEC vision of regional prosperity by supporting the capacity of economies and communities to adapt to climate impacts and to ensure food security by:

1) Organizing an international dialogue and technical cooperation on climate change adaptation and mitigation through the facilitation of relevant discourse between over 100 scientists, policy-makers, practitioners, academics, and private sector representatives;

2) Sharing knowledge and understanding of the role of weather and climate information in agriculture production, fisheries and food security in APEC member economies; and

3) Compiling key concerns and policy recommendations on the integration of climate information in agriculture and fishery management that are aligned with APEC priorities for improved regional food security, to be submitted by Peru to the Food Security Ministerial Meeting on September 26, 2016.

Alignment

The project supports the APEC 2016 host economy’s priority on building sustainable and resilient economies, with direct relevance to the work programs i) Climate Change, and iv) Food Security and Agricultural Technical Cooperation. The symposium will be co-hosted by the Peruvian National Service for Meteorology and Hydrology and the Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Relations. The project supports the APEC High Level Policy Dialogue on Food Security and Blue Economy Action Plan, and will feed directly into the APEC Food Security Week, which will be held in Peru immediately after the symposium, by expanding regional comprehension of the risks and opportunities and by generating relevant policy recommendations. The project also supports the APEC Framework for Strengthening Economic Cooperation and Development goals to attain sustainable and equitable development and to improve the economic and social well-being of the people.

The project supports PPSTI’s goal of promoting engagement in joint scientific research in inception, dissemination, and commercialization (in this case policy mainstreaming) (PPSTI TOR). It also supports the medium term work plans across the following goals: Enhance human capacity in policy development and best practice sharing, develop common approaches to science technology and innovation policies and to develop networks and platforms that foster STI cooperation. Moreover, the project supports regional S&T connectivity and science capacity building to strengthen regional connectivity as an enabler for innovation as identified in the 2016 work plan. Additionally, PPSTI has decided to place greater emphasis on innovation and its policy in its deliberations and sponsored activities in APEC economies, which fits directly with the goals of the project.

TILF/ASF Justification

Not Applicable.

Beneficiaries and Outputs

Outputs: The central output of the project is the 11th APEC Climate Symposium, to be held in Piura, Peru on September 16-18, 2016. This event will host lectures from prominent scientists, practitioners, and policy-makers on the subject of climate science in food security for agriculture and fisheries, enhancing the knowledge of all participants. Dialogue will be held on the practical application of climate science, experiences shared on implementation challenges, and policy recommendations will be discussed. Select interviews of participants will be held during the symposium. The proceedings, lecture materials, and any policy discussions or recommendations will be circulated to APEC and beyond.

A small survey will be conducted prior to the symposium to investigate the key concerns of relevant stakeholders connected to food security. This will provide the opportunity for individuals who do not attend the symposium, in particular from relevant APEC fora and private sector, to give input into highlighting the challenges and opportunities in linking climate science to food security. The results will be distributed to participants, for discussion during the symposium, and be distributed with the proceedings after the event. 

Outcomes: Increased international dialogue and technical cooperation on climate change adaptation and mitigation for food security in agriculture and fisheries.

The project will bring together over 100 participants at the APEC Climate Symposium, in Piura, Peru. Discussion will be held on a variety of topics, covering short and long-term climate and weather issues in agriculture and fisheries. The sessions are described in further detail in the work plan, section 10. Participants in these discussions will include international organizations, academics, climate and agriculture researchers, experienced agriculture and fishery managers, private sector representatives.

Enhanced understanding of the role of weather and climate information in food production among participants.

The central goal of the project is to strengthen the ability of high-level policy-makers to integrate modern climate science in the planning and management of agriculture and fisheries. Participants will be able to articulate the effect of climate and weather on agricultural production on food security, and understand how climate information can be employed in building climate resilience in agriculture and fisheries. Policy-makers will not only be made aware of useful advances in climate science, but also gain an understanding of the desires of end-users such as private sector, and be thus better equipped to address food security. Participants with a science-background, from academia or research institutions, will have an increased understanding of the challenges of policy development and the information requirements. High satisfaction and comprehension of participants, as evidenced by proceedings, documents, interviews, and the symposium feedback survey, will verify this knowledge-oriented outcome.

Policy recommendations, key concerns, and challenges developed.

The major outcomes of the APEC Climate Symposium will be synthesized and submitted by Peru to the Food Security Ministerial Meeting on September 26, 2016. This will ensure that the discussions and conclusions of the event will be disseminated to key discussions for Food Security in the APEC region.

Beneficiaries: As with many APEC projects, the project focuses on high-level policy dialogue to enact change. As such, the primary beneficiaries are individuals involved in high-level governmental decision making, recommended to the event through APEC fora such as PPSTI and PPFS. The ideal APEC representative will be involved in governmental decision-making for agriculture or fisheries and possess an understanding of the complex impacts of climate change on their economy. Furthermore, the ideal participant will be familiar with their economies’ priorities for science and innovation, in addition to food security. Given the technical nature of many presentations, the ideal participant would at minimum be comfortable with such language. To enact change on the larger system of management and policy, the project will change the knowledge and consequently the behaviour of participants, as described in the outcome section. The project will bring benefits to information producers and users in both developing and developed economies and will further global discourse on linking climate and agricultural policy.

The project will engage experts from international organizations, academics, climate and agriculture researchers, experienced agriculture and fishery managers, private sector representatives. Sustainable agriculture and fisheries will be promoted with the interest of building the adaptation and mitigation capacity of food producers and decision-makers through both practical and policy oriented outputs. Such a process requires a dynamic process of dialogue and feedbacks between the forecasters, decision-makers, and farmers, ensuring that the benefits of the project are dispersed across various groups. Climate scientists need to understand how agricultural planning decisions are made and what the user requirements for climate forecasts are. On the other hand, farmers, policy makers, and other users need to build scientific literacy to understand how climate information is produced and the uncertainties inherent to forecasts. The project seeks to alter the typical linear flows of information transfer from producers to users by fostering a collaborative dialogue. These issues need to be discussed at the levels of policy making, academic research, and the private sector to gain a clear understanding of the end-to-end process of producing and using climate information to mitigate and adapt to climate risks. Presentation topics will include key scientific findings, but also experiences and lessons learned, so that both technical and practical approaches will be covered. APCC will also strive to achieve a balance in speakers and participants and actively seek out participation from developing economies and women.

The participants are expected to share their learning and experiences with colleagues after they return to their member economies. The project outputs will be available through the APCC website to assist participants with information recall and transfer. Because the sessions will allow producers of climate information to interface with end-users, we hope to promote lasting relationships that will continue beyond the confines of the project.

Dissemination

The direct outputs of the project (survey results, symposium proceedings, presentation materials, policy recommendations, etc) will be distributed to participants, PPSTI, other relevant fora (PPFS, OFWG, and ATCWG), and APCC stakeholders during the project and made permanently available to the general public on the APCC online database. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs (Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores del Perú) will also present the symposium outcomes to the Food Security Ministerial Meeting on September 26, 2016. The target audience of the project are those involved in high-level policy dialogue, however that the material will be written in accessible language for a range of end users in addition to specialists. Media will be contacted to communicate significant results.

In a broader context, outputs of the project will be integrated into APCC projects and future initiatives. The 2016 APCC Annual Report, published both physically and digitally, will contain highlights and major outcomes of the symposium. The previous APCC Annual Report was distributed to almost 500 organizations and individuals, which include academics, research institutes, businesses, government, and international organizations. Presentations from past APEC Climate Symposia are currently being compiled by the proponent for a special publication, which will occur again within five years. The discussions and connections during this event influence the development projects implemented by APCC and its partners.

Gender

Climate change and food security are particularly salient issues for women and children. Worldwide, an estimated 60% of undernourished people are women or girls.[1] Climate change further threatens traditional food sources, which may become more unpredictable and scarce. Related increases in food prices make food more inaccessible to poor people, in particular to women and girls whose health has been found to decline more than male health in times of food shortages.[2] About two-thirds of the female labour force in developing economies are engaged in agricultural work. By addressing food security, this project will help promote policies that mitigate the negative impacts of climate change on agriculture and fisheries, benefiting women throughout the APEC region.

Gender discrepancy is a notable issue in the atmospheric sciences. A 2001 report by the World Meteorological Organization estimated that a mere 23% of professionals working in Government Hydrological and Meteorological Services are female.[3] The amount of women in senior positions in such organizations is even lower. Given the gender discrepancy among the pool of targeted participants, the proponent will strive to involve women in the event and ensure that the ratio of female participants falls at the very least above the 23% represented by the 2001 study. Furthermore, four of the seven members of the Organizing Committee for the project are women and will assure that the program design and agenda are gender equitable.

The project is expected to engage and develop the skills of both women and men equally. Participants from both genders will be given the opportunity to share their experiences during the conference sessions. The session facilitators will take care to solicit audience feedback from both female and male participants so that an even range of perspectives is shared.The pre-symposium survey and event feedback survey will both collect gendered statistics to enable an accurate understanding of demographics and allow for disaggregated analysis of data, and women will be particularly targeted for the pre-symposium survey. Gender will be considered during the design of survey questions.


[1] United Nations Economic and Social Council [ECOSOC] 2007, para. 14; World Food Programme [WFP] 2009a, p. 6

[2] UN Women Watch. “Fact Sheet: Women, Gender Equality and Climate”. 2010. http://www.un.org/womenwatch/feature/climate_change/

[3] Henson, Bob. University Corporation of Atmospheric Research, “Women in Meteorology: How Long a Minority?” Last modified 2003. Accessed 6 May 2016. http://www.ucar.edu/communications/quarterly/fall03/wmo.html.

Work Plan

Initiation (February – March: Complete): The Project Proponent and local host will discuss shared tasks, including the division of duties such as coordinating with participants, venue preparations, assembly of abstract book, printing of streamers, providing for refreshments and meals, etc. The local host and proponent will draft and sign letters of intent, to clarify intended roles. APEC funding will be applied for via PPSTI.

Actions: letter of intent, Project Concept Note. 

Initial planning (April - May): The proponent will convene an Organizing Committee composed of experts and leaders in the field of climate prediction and applications to agriculture. The Committee will act as an advisory body on the content and design of the workshops and sessions. The proponent will also liaise with the chairs and key contacts of the Policy Partnership on Food Security to scope out opportunities for cross-fora collaboration. Potential workshop speakers will be identified using a collaborative process, integrating the input of various contributors including the proponent, the local host, key scientists, the APEC Business Advisory Council, and others. APEC funding process will be continued.

Actions: speaker invitations, Project Proposal 

Program development (May - August): The Project Proponent and local host will discuss shared tasks, including the division of duties such as coordinating with participants, venue preparations, assembly of abstract book, printing of streamers, providing for refreshments and meals, etc. The proponent will then contact the local hosts about arrangements for the venue, accommodations and local transportation. The local host will estimate costs and make the necessary reservations. An announcement of symposium objectives and proceedings will be released and invitations will be issued. Speakers will be chosen from potential list and invited.

Actions: reservations, first announcement, invitations, logistic arrangements

Communication with participants (June - July): The proponent will set up an online form for participant registration and submission of abstracts and presentations. Participant registration and upload of abstracts will commence. Official letters of invitation from the local host will be issued in order to secure a Peruvian visa.

Actions: online form, abstracts, visa invitation letters 

Monitoring and tracking of progress (July - August): Registration of participants will be monitored and workshop sessions will be organized. All information regarding accommodation, transportation, reception, the program draft, etc. will be communicated to participants in a second announcement. Project Overseer (PO) justifications for non-APEC participants will be sent for APEC Secretariat approval (if needed). The proponent will work closely with the PPSTI Program Executive on airfare approvals. A monitoring report detailing the progress of activities will be prepared and submitted to APEC by August 1.

Actions: second announcement, monitoring report, PO justifications (if needed), participant list. 

Survey (July - August): A pre-symposium survey will be developed with the input of relevant experts on climate science, agriculture, fisheries and policy. Questions will inquire about key challenges, concerns, and opportunities for change. Respondents will include members from the potential speaker list, relevant APEC fora (PPSTI, PPFS, ATCWG, and OFWG), and all invited participants. Results will be collected in August and distributed during the symposium. These results will be included in final proceedings.

Actions: pre-symposium survey. 

Conduct symposium (September): A press release will be issued by the organizers and local host. Final preparations for venues, sessions, program, etc. will be made. The symposium will occur over three days, from September 16-18, 2016 in Piura, Peru. Results will be shared with the Food Security Ministerial Meeting on September 26, 2016.

Actions: press release, symposium, summary of policy recommendations.

Follow-up activities (October): The proponent will send reimbursement announcements and thank you notes to participants.

Actions: communications to participants, reimbursements. 

Evaluation (November): Proceedings, workshop modules, presentations, and other materials will be edited and uploaded to the APEC Climate Symposium website and distributed as per section 8 of this proposal. An internal evaluation will be conducted by APCC staff and local hosts based on assessments and APEC survey forms completed by participants. A completion report will be sent to APEC before February 1 of the following year.

Actions: proceedings, presentation files, symposium feedback survey results, completion report. 

APEC Climate Symposium Program Outline:

Friday, September 16, 2016: Opening Ceremony and Keynote Speeches

Session I. Utilizing Climate Science in Agriculture: Impacts of Extreme Weather Events and Seasonal Phenomena on Agriculture

Increased climate variability and extreme weather events due to climate change have important effects on the agricultural systems of the Asia-Pacific region, with small communities of developing economies being most vulnerable to these changes. Seasonal climatic phenomena like the El Niño–Southern Oscillation have significant impacts on regional food security, particularly through extreme weather events such as droughts and floods. While there are still great challenges to solve, recent improvements in climate monitoring and observation systems increases the ability for agricultural decision-makers to respond intelligently to and manage extreme weather and climatic events. Thus, promoting climate science based agricultural policies on extreme weather events and adopting innovative technologies of climate-smart agriculture are essential next steps required for achieving sustainable agriculture and food production in the region. This session will therefore focus on the role that climate science can play in defining short-term to seasonal agricultural decisions. 

Saturday, September 17, 2016: Session II. Employing Climate Science for Long-Term Agricultural Planning

Food security issues in developing economies in the APEC region will be exacerbated by the impact of climate change. These effects go beyond extreme weather events discussed in Session 1 and may include significant shifts in meteorological patterns, resulting in other large-scale changes in agricultural sectors. While this is widely accepted as integral information for sustainable agriculture and food security, there are still significant gaps in translating climate information from scenarios into long-term agricultural policy development, particularly on a local scale. Many economies lack the awareness or capacity to reap the benefits from advances in climate modelling and downscaling. Exploring the challenges and opportunities in long-term agricultural planning will help bridge this gap, thus facilitating the use of climate information by policy-makers. This session will therefore compliment Session 1 by examining the practical application of climate science for long-term agricultural planning, with the intention of bridging gaps between science and policy.

Session III. Long-term solutions for fisheries vulnerable to climate change.

Rising ocean temperature and acidity rapidly alters aquatic ecosystems. These changes threaten marine organisms and fisheries by affecting fish habitats, production, and distribution. Fishing industries of APEC economies, particularly those in development, are at high risk and proper decisions on policy should be made immediately for sustained economic growth. In this session, current and expected climate change challenges for fisheries will be introduced and long-term solutions to maintain healthy ocean ecosystems and enhance food security will be discussed. 

Sunday, September 18, 2016: Wrap-up Session and Final Discussions

Key points and major conclusions from the previous sessions will be synthesized for the wrap-up session, A focused discussion will be held to connect these concepts and help bring together priority policy recommendations, providing an intelligent close to the symposium. This will be summarized in the event proceedings.

Risks

The risks to the project are fairly minimal and easily managed.

1) Delays: With over ten years of experience running the APEC Climate Symposium in locations across the APEC region, any logistic and or event risks are low probability and low impact. Careful planning and close collaboration between the proponent and the local host help minimize this risk.

2) ow interest in participation or in using results: The focus of the project was developed based on the expressed interest of the host economy, as well as other APEC economies. The survey will ensure that a broader range of interests and concerns are represented. The project assumes that the participants are eager to learn, receptive to new ideas and willing to apply and share new concepts in their workplace. The topics discussed are centered around the major concerns of food security, which is a key issue this year, evidenced by the up-coming Food Security week in September and therefore minimizing the likelihood of this risk.

3) Duplication of work: Consultation and active engagement with other APEC fora will help minimize this risk. The project has already been presented at PPFS and there are on-going discussions with other initiatives to ensure that the event will build on past efforts and contribute to future work rather than duplicate.

4) Unsuitable selection of speakers: One of the risks is to ensure a selection of good speakers in order to make the most of the symposium. The speakers should be, but not limited to, authority officials to represent government, climate science specialists, agriculture and fishery experts, others from relevant organizations, which aim to reflecting points of views from various perspectives. In organizing the activity, the proponent assumes that the invited speakers are knowledgeable and cogent communicators, the workshop leaders are effective in structuring discussions and eliciting participation. A lot of the success of the workshops will depend on the abilities of the speakers and the openness of the participants. The Organizers will work closely with the co-host Peru and solicit the input of experts to nominate and invite the most suitable speakers for the Symposium.

5) Difficulty translating recommendations to home economy situation: Although this project does not extend to the implementation of the symposium recommendation in home economies, participants will be encouraged to share best practices and lessons learned on integrating climate-focused policies in agriculture and fisheries.

Monitoring and Evaluation

The progress of the event planning and delivery will be compared to the work plan to ensure that the project is being implemented in a timely manner. The co-host economy Peru will also be involved in the monitoring of the project, giving accountability to the proper delivery of the symposium and any outputs. In accordance with APEC regulations, the Principal Overseer will keep the Program Director and Program Executive regularly informed of the progress in implementing the project, at no more than two month intervals. A monitoring report will be submitted to Secretariat on August 1, 2016.

All speakers and participants will be requested to provide feedback on the efficiency and outcomes of the symposium whether the objectives are met, whether the information sharing is able to bring about changes after its completion and how. This feedback will be collected using an event evaluation form, delivered at the end of the symposium. This evaluation form has been carefully developed through over ten years of delivering this symposium. This evaluation form will include questions on: i) whether the symposium meets its set objectives through an assessment of satisfaction and comprehension; ii) if they believe the event produced useful or significant outcomes iii) if the event included a representative selection of participants, or if they felt some important sectors were missing; iv) quality of the speakers and presentations; v) background and demographic statistics, including gender, to assess adequate representation from women and developing economies. It will also include the APEC Project Evaluation Survey, found in Appendix I of the Guidebook on APEC Projects.

The results of this feedback will be compared to project indicators on demographics which specify at least 100 participants and at least 23% women. (It should be noted that the majority of participants are not selected by the project implementers, but rather the APEC economies themselves, and as such can only be encouraged to send female experts.) The dissemination of the outputs, including symposium proceedings, will be delivered as described in the project proposal.

Linkages

The APEC Climate Center was established in 2005 with the agreement and support of all member economies at the Leader’s Summit in Busan, Korea. Since then, APCC has provided high-quality climate information products to the region. While in early years, APCC’s projects were more oriented toward climate prediction, with some exploratory work in applications, APCC is now actively initiating discussion in climate applications and collaborating with relevant organizations in the region. The reason for this shift is that there is a growing demand for climate information, particularly from developing economies, as talks on climate variability and change gain prominence in governmental agendas. Additionally, recent reports from international initiatives such as the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC) and the development of the Global Framework on Climate Services (GFCS), have recommend the utility of tailoring climate information for the agricultural sector. APCC is situated in a unique position that allows it to interface with both climate scientists and policymakers based on its mandate and position in the APEC framework. Therefore, APCC is attuned with the progression of international climate initiatives without duplicating the activities in the framework of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO).

Within APEC, the project team will collaborate with the PPSTI, Oceans and Fisheries Working Group (OFWG), Agricultural Technical Cooperation Working Group (ATCWG), and the Policy Partnership on Food Security (PPFS). The project would link to global-level organizations such as the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the World Food Programme (WFP), the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD), the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), and others. The project will feed directly into the APEC Food Security Week, which will be held in Peru immediately after the symposium, by expanding regional comprehension of the risks and opportunities and by generating relevant policy recommendations.

APEC is in the ideal institution to support the project. While the project will focus on applications to the agricultural sector, climate cuts across development issues and also impacts sustainable growth, rural employment, and economic development – precisely the areas in which APEC furthers economic and technical cooperation. APEC Leaders recognized the need for an institutionalized mechanism for sharing climate information in 2005, when they hailed the establishment of the APEC Climate Center. APCC has progressively delivered positive results on its APEC projects, continuously innovating, improving, and adding value in a sustainable fashion. Additionally, APEC focuses on high-level policy dialogue, which is also the primary focus of the project.

Sustainability

The project will contribute to building more sustainable and resilient agricultural and fishery systems. Advance climate forecasts allow agricultural producers to make better informed decisions, plan for contingencies, and minimize risk. Learning to adapt to current-day climate variability lays a critical foundation for coping with long-term climate change, which is essential for intelligent policy-making.

Climate forecasts only have value when they affect human behavior – when the information presented in said forecast is put towards decision making and concrete action. Therefore, the project was designed to share perspectives from a variety of actors: climate scientists, representatives from government meteorological services who conduct operational forecasting, experts in agriculture and extension agents, representatives from the private sector, and providers of agricultural and fishery inputs and rural credit. The project offers a unique opportunity for decision makers from the agricultural and fishery sectors to interface with climate scientists and communicate their forecast needs. The goal is to facilitate interaction and build what will hopefully become enduring relationships among participants. The project will strengthen and enlarge the network of climate scientists, academics, decision-makers, agricultural agencies, the private sector and other stakeholders in the APEC region and will support North-South and South-South cooperation in climate prediction and forecast applications.

The project is not a one-off initiative but part of a broader APEC Climate Center program to develop linkages between climate forecasts and their application. The proponent will continue to communicate with the Working Group members, composed of official representatives of government meteorological services and research centers. APCC will also continue to conduct its own outreach initiatives to communicate with participants through surveys and networking to solicit feedback that will be integrated in developing its products and services. The project will build upon APCC’s proven track record of successful international cooperation and exchange of climate information and services.

Project Overseers

Ms. Sangwon Moon heads the External Affairs Department at APEC Climate Center. She completed her master degree in International Area Studies from Pukyong National University in 2010. She then worked as an International Project Coordinator for seven years at the same university.

She also leads several APCC projects that aim to build capacity amongst scientists in developing economies, namely the Young Scientist Support Program (YSSP) and the Climate Prediction Training Program (CPTP).

The Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the National Meteorology and Hydrology Service of Peru (SENAMHI) are the main contact points of the co-host, Peru. SENAMHI aims at generating and providing meteorological, hydrological and climate knowledge and information in a reliable, timely and accessible manner for the benefit of the Peruvian society, With the ongoing intention of disseminating reliable and quality information SENAMHI operates, controls, organizes and maintains the National Network of more than 900 meteorological and hydrological stations according to the technical standards established by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO).

Cost Efficiency

Not Applicable.

Drawdown Timetable

Not Applicable.

Direct Labour

Not Applicable.

Waivers

Not Applicable.

Are there any supporting document attached?

No 
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Expected Start Date

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Beneficiaries and Outputs

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Gender

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