Project Title

Towards the Construction of Public-Private Strategies to Reduce the Costs of Gender-based Violence in APEC Economies 

Project Year

2016   

Project Number

PPWE 03 2016 

Project Session

Session 1   

Project Type

Standard 

Project Status

Project in Implementation   
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Project No.

PPWE 03 2016 

Project Title

Towards the Construction of Public-Private Strategies to Reduce the Costs of Gender-based Violence in APEC Economies 

Project Status

Project in Implementation 

Publication (if any)

 

Fund Account

General Project Account 

Sub-fund

None 

Project Year

2016 

Project Session

Session 1 

APEC Funding

75,000 

Co-funding Amount

10,000 

Total Project Value

85,000 

Sponsoring Forum

Policy Partnership on Women and the Economy (PPWE) 

Topics

Gender 

Committee

SOM Steering Committee on Economic and Technical Cooperation (SCE) 

Other Fora Involved

 

Other Non-APEC Stakeholders Involved

 

Proposing Economy(ies)

Peru 

Co-Sponsoring Economies

Australia; Papua New Guinea; Chinese Taipei; United States 

Expected Start Date

01/07/2016 

Expected Completion Date

31/06/2017 

Project Proponent Name 1

Mery Vargas Cuno (new PO wef 19 August 2017) 

Job Title 1

General Director, General Direction against Gender Violence 

Organization 1

Minister of Women and Vulnerable People of Peru 

Postal Address 1

Jr. Camana 616, Lima, Peru 

Telephone 1

51-1 6261600 Extension 8300 

Fax 1

Not Applicable 

Email 1

mvargas@mimp.gob.pe 

Project Proponent Name 2

Liliana Huayhua Palomino (co-PO wef 19 August 2017) 

Job Title 2

Deputy PO 

Organization 2

Minister of Women and Vulnerable People of Peru 

Postal Address 2

Jr. Camana 616, Lima, Peru 

Telephone 2

51-1 6261600 Extension 8310 

Fax 2

Not Applicable 

Email 2

lhuayhua@mimp.gob.pe 

Declaration

Mery Vargas Cuno and Liliana Huayhua Palomino 

Project Summary

Gender-based violence (GBV) restricts women’s full partnership in workforce of APEC economies limiting the construction of inclusive economies. The project proposes to increase the knowledge on economic costs of gender-based violence and best practices promoted by the public and private sectors to eliminate violence, decrease their costs and strengthen businesses capacities. This will be achieved by the compilation of methodologies used in the measurement of economic costs of gender-based violence; the compilation of best practices to prevent gender-based violence; an international workshop that will elaborate recommendations for both themes; a virtual publication that will provide tools to carry out studies on measurement of violence and the elaboration of indicators; a virtual publication that will disseminate recommendations and best practices to eliminate gender-based violence and decrease their costs.

Relevance

Relevance - Region: Inter-American Convention on Prevention, Punishment and Eradication of Violence against Women, “Convention of Belém Do Pará”, defines violence against women to any action or behavior, based on their gender causing death, harm or physical, sexual or psychological suffering to women, both in the public and private sectors, including physical, sexual and psychological violence. In the world, 35% of women has been victims of physical and/or sexual violence by their partners, or sexual violence by people other than their partner[1]. According to the World Bank, women between the ages 15 to 44 years old are in higher risk to be victims of rape and family violence, than cancer, car accidents, wars and malaria[2].  50% of sexual assault victims in the world are women under 16 years old[3].  More than 35% of women’s assassinations worldwide are committed by their partner or former partner[4]. The prevalence rates compared worldwide are[5]: Africa 45.6%, The Americas 36.1%, Southeast Asia 40.2%, Europe 27.2%, Eastern Mediterranean 36.4%, West Pacific 27.9%,  economies with high incomes 32.7%.

Gender-based violence, besides being a human right issue, it is a global problem that affects specially women’s participation in the workforce and has costs that impact in the economy. “Some studies show that violence is determining in the income perceived by women and women victims of family violence use 22% more health services, perceived lower income and have higher unemployment probabilities”[6]. 23.24% of Peruvian-salaried workers have been victims during the last 12 months of some type of violence by their partners, approximately 4 times per year, and where 4 out of 10 victims have been attacked by their former partner”[7]. This causes significant labor consequences: Absence days generate a cost of 3.7% of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP)[8]. Likewise, women victims of sexual harassment at work cause less production and larger absenteeism. Additionally, sexual harassment generates stress, makes teamwork more complicated and reduces work performance[9].

When women are empowered their families are healthier, more children go to school, agricultural productivity improves, and incomes increase. It has also become evident that economic empowerment of women indirectly reduces cases of gender based violence worldwide.

- Several studies have suggested that there is an inverted U-shaped relationship between economic empowerment and violence against women. Where women have consolidated (long-established) economic power, they tend to be at lower risk of violence (Anderson, 1997). However, where women’s economic power is in transition, men are more likely to feel threatened by this, and there is often a (relatively) short-term spike in male violence against women.  For example, women's disempowerment can inhibit women from leaving or resisting abusive relationships. Women's increasing income diminishes violence, but only up to a point. When a woman earns much of the family income, her partner may lash out in frustration—suggesting a possible curvilinear relationship between women's income and hitting (Macmillan and Gartner, 2009). This is a key issue on survival SME owned women survival rate.

- A study has found that VAWG can be reduced when economic empowerment projects are combined with interventions to improve communication within the household (Willman, 2013). As such, there is a case to be made for including activities on communication strengthening, conflict resolution, and VAWG sensitization up front in economic empowerment initiatives.

- Women’s ownership of land and property is more strongly associated with a reduction in violence than employment as it acts as a “tangible exit option”, strengthening women’s fallback position and therefore their bargaining power within marriage and acts as a deterrent to marital violence[10].

There are experiences that have served as examples to involve the private sector as facilitators for GBV prevention that are not very well-known by the APEC economies. In Peru, the experience of “Safe Business Free from Violence and Discrimination against Women’s Accreditation” is a strategic public-private alliance that has proven to be very effective and can be easily duplicate it by other non APEC economies (for instance, Paraguay).

The project will benefit APEC member economies because it will provide evidence of GBV, one of the biggest barriers for women’s full participation in the economy, when assessing the seriousness and how this affects women and the economies in the region. Hence, it will demonstrate the need to invest in policies to counteract it. In addition, best practices in APEC economies will be identified, and it will provide information to make policies and programs that allow preventing GBV.

Relevance - Rank: The project is included under the following finance criteria of APEC 2016:

Rank 1: Projects that demonstrate a direct link to promoting regional economic integration

Human capital development. GBV deteriorates human present and capital formation (for the intergenerational transfer of violence), thus fighting it is a priority to achieve full development. Boys and girls who witness violence are in risk of committing or experiencing violence in the future, a poor school performance, emotional and behavior problems[11]. Moreover, as stated in the 2015 APEC Leaders’ Declaration, women and adolescents do not only need to be trained with technical education, but their resilience skills must be also strengthened.

Building sustainable and resilient communities. Today, the world is urbanized on an unprecedented scale in the history, however, the cities are still places of inequality and insecurity, where sexual harassment and other forms of sexual violence in public areas occur daily in the life of women and girls all over the world. “This reality reduces movement freedom for women and girls and their capacity to participate in school, work and public life (…). It also affects negatively in their health and welfare”[12]. The change to fair sociocultural patterns, builds up less discriminatory communities, more respectful towards people. The highest respect for alterity and regulations generate a lower level of social conflicts.

Emergency preparedness and disaster management. Women and girls are in a special vulnerability situation during disasters, they have a higher probability to die, but also during and after a disaster, the GBV incidence increases in an exponential manner, in which rape, human trafficking and domestic violence are included[13].

Rank 2: Projects that directly support the APEC Strategy for Strengthening Quality Growth

Women and the Economy. GBV is one of the biggest barriers that limit women’s capacity to incorporate, remain and progress in the workforce because it reduces their productivity, therefore its addressing is essential to achieve an inclusive development in the economies of the region. Several studies have demonstrated that working on economic empowerment only without taking preventive measures at the same time against VAW and working the change of sociocultural patterns in women and their partners, can put women in higher GBV risk and drives them away from empowerment[14][15]; due to stereotype challenges and traditional values, and weakness of women’s position in household decisions[16]. Therefore, and according to the principle of “no harm”, complementary measures must be taken.

Activities/issues related to addressing the social dimension of globalization, including health and gender, aging population and vulnerable groups. Addressing GBV is one of the five barriers identified by the Health Working Group (HWG) that prevent women’s health improvement, and impede more economic participation. It would be contributing to achieve one of the goals in Sustainable Development Goals: “Eliminating all forms of violence against women and girls in the public and private sectors, including sexual trafficking and exploitation as well as other types of exploitation”, in which businesses, educational institutions, public sector and partnerships play an important role. In the case of businesses, it lines out a new dimension in entrepreneurial social responsibility and, therefore, it extends with a new sector to facilitators.



[1] World Health Organization. World and regional estimates on violence against women: Prevalence and effects on domestic violence and non-domestic sexual assault in health. 2013.

http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/85239/1/9789241564625_eng.pdf?ua=1

[2] Ibid

[3] Gasman, Nadice and Alvarez, Gabriela. Gender: Violence against Women. Quarterly Americas Fall 2010.

http://www.americasquarterly.org/node/1930

[4] World Health Organization. Understanding and addressing violence against women. Feminicide. 2012.

http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/77421/1/WHO_RHR_12.38_eng.pdf

[5] World Health Organization. Global and regional estimates of violence against women: prevalence and effects of domestic violence and non-spousal sexual violence on health. 2013.

http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/releases/2013/violence_against_women_20130620/es/

[6] Díaz, Ramón and Miranda, Juan José. Approximation of economic cost and determinats of domestic violence in Peru [Aproximación del costo económico y determinantes de la violencia doméstica en el Perú]. Economy and Society. Number 75, August 2010, page 57.

[7] Vara, Arístides. Bussiness cost of violence against women in Peru [Los costos empresariales de la violencia contra las mujeres en el Perú]. San Martín University and GIZ, 2013, page 156.

[8] Ídem.

[10] See studies from Kerala (Panda and Agarwal, 2005), Uttar Pradesh (Bhattacharya et al, 2009), and rural Haryana (Chowdry, 2011)

[11] Heise, Lori. Violence against women: The hidden health burden [Violencia contra la Mujer: la Carga Oculta sobre la Salud]. Washington: PHO/WHO. Woman, Health and Development Program, 1994. Page 34.

[13] UNDP. Gender and Disasters [Género y Desastres]. www.undp.org/content/dam/undp/library/.../disaster/Reduccion-Genero.pdf

[14] Garikipati, S. (2008). The impact of leading to women on household vulnerability and women’s empowerment: Evidence from India. World Development, 36(12), 2620-2642.

[15] Vara, Arístides. The costs of violence against women in the Peruvian formal microenterprises. An estimate of its economic impact [Los costos de la violencia contra las mujeres en las microempresas formales peruanas. Una estimación de su impacto económico]. San Martín University and GIZ, 2015.

[16] Balasubramanian, S. (2013). Why Micro-Credit may leave women worse off: Non- Cooperative Bargaining and the Marriage Game in South Asia. The Journal of Development Studies, 49 (5), 609-623.

Objectives

1) To increase knowledge on the measurement and valuation of the economic costs of violence against women in APEC economies.

2) To disseminate and exchange successful experiences in the public and private sectors to prevent violence, reduce costs and build capacity in enterprises.

Alignment

The project contributes to the first objective of the PPWE Strategic Plan 2015-2018 “Strengthen the integration of gender responsive policies in the programs across the APEC Fora”, to the extent that their recommendations will be disseminated and be included in several APEC working groups.

It also contributes to the third outcome “Women’s skills, capacities and health are strengthened to prepare them to succeed at work, business and entrepreneurship” of the second objective. Concerning this outcome, in Appendix 2 of the Strategic Plan, it refers to women facing barriers that limit their participation in the economy, thus it is proposed that “the APEC economies across all the Fora must consider and make efforts to enhance women’s access to decent work and healthy lifestyles (…) and against discrimination and harassment, including specific laws for workplace; and most importantly, gender-based violence awareness and prevention campaigns.” Besides, the no harm principle will be fulfilled in that manner.

The project is also aligned to the 2015 APEC Leaders’ Declaration “Building Inclusive Economies, Building a Better World”, where the importance of facilitating full participation in every sector and segment of the society, especially women, to achieve an inclusive development, is acknowledged. The project contributes to this goal taking actions to reverse GBV, which is one of the factors that reduces women’s growth possibilities and participation.

Likewise, the project contributes to the strategy “Developing the 21st Century Workforce: Key to Inclusive and Sustainable Growth proposed in the Port Moresby Joint Statement on the 2015 High Level Policy Dialogue On Human Capacity Building”, that considers "Support measures to enhance access to the workforce for vulnerable groups, such as women (...), through measures such as fighting against discrimination (...); partnerships with the private sector to develop innovative, inclusive practices; and building the capacity of employment services to make their services more accessible to vulnerable groups" in item 19.

Finally, it complements the initiative “Healthy Women, Healthy Economies” of the Health Working Group (HWG), in the framework of cross-fora cooperation with HWG and PPWE, where GBV is identified as one of the five barriers to improve women’s health making possible their economic participation increase within APEC economies.

TILF/ASF Justification

Not Applicable.

Beneficiaries and Outputs

Outputs:

-  Reference terms elaborated and disseminated.

-  Report on the methodologies used in the APEC economies to measure and assess the economic costs on gender-based violence.

-  A study that identifies and organizes successful experiences carried out in the APEC economies by public and private sectors to prevent gender-based violence, providing evidence for businesses so they can act preventing it, and the costs such violence could generate.

-  Workshop on the methodologies used in the APEC economies to measure and assess the economic costs on GBV.

-  Recommendations to improve measurements and valuations on gender-based violence economic costs in the APEC economies.

-  Workshop on successful experiences preventing gender-based violence and reducing generating costs.

-  Best practices and recommendations to prevent violence and reduce the costs it generates.

-  Digital publication that introduces the methodologies used in the economies of the APEC economies to measure and assess gender-based violence economic costs.

-  Digital publication containing the best practices identified and can be used by the APEC economies as models to be replicated.

-  Disseminated outcomes of the project.

-  Elaborated monitoring reports and final report.

*The dissemination of the publications will contribute to create awareness and interest at the level of the APEC economies on the economic costs of gender-based violence and will provide tools to measure and revert it.

Outcomes:

1) Participating economies and co-sponsors involved in all the project’s phases. The project will generate capacities in the participating economies, through the involvement of co-sponsors in all the project’s phases: research, workshops, material production and dissemination of outcomes.

2) The report on measurement and valuation of the costs of gender-based violence and the  methodologies workshop will allow providing information to the APEC economies on how gender-based violence impacts on the economies and, therefore, becoming aware and being interested in the need of measuring and valuating, as well as implementing strategies to revert it.

3) The guide report of measurement and valuation methodologies of the economic costs of gender-based violence will provide tools and steps to enhance the different types of costs of the GBV, so that economies can adapt it to their reality. At the same time the economies that are already doing studies can improve them, and those that want to start, can count with the guidelines required to do so.

Also it is expected changes in the data policies encouraged the reporting and recording of incidents in order that such information is processed and allow valuing the costs of violence. This information can be used to design and implement programs of prevention and reduction of GBV. This process will involve officials of labor, health, justice, and gender of APEC member economies; the private sector, academia; and NGOs.

4) Participants of the best practice workshop acquire new knowledge and take interest in the need of implementing them. The compilation and systematization of experiences in preventing gender-based violence will motivate and allow their implementation by other APEC economies. This is expected to develop and strengthen mechanism and public-private programs to prevent GBV. Likewise as to encourage employers to develop policies that facilitate environments no tolerance and prevention of GBV.

5) Among entities that can implement these results are mechanisms of women, Labor Ministries,Ministry of Health, private sector, NGOs and Universities.

In the case of Peru the Labor Ministry involve the General Direction for Conflict Resolution and Corporate Social Responsibility, the General Direction of Fundamental Rights and Safety at Work, the Health Ministry involve the Department of Health; the private sector, companies that have obtained the Seal Safe Company like Laboratorios Bago, EDELNOR, EDEGEL, International Bakery, Ramsa, Danper Trujillo, Universal Textil, Sodimac, among other; NGOs as Peru 2021, GRADE, SASE, etc; and Universities as San Martin University through its Quality Institute and the Catolic University of Peru through its Social Responsibility Direction.

6) The recommendations identified in the methodologies workshop and in the best practices workshop, the achievements and outcomes will be discussed in the PPWE meeting and APEC fora.

7) The dissemination and discussion of the project’s outcomes will allow gender-based violence and their economic impacts be incorporated as an interest issue on various fora carried out by APEC, promoting the capacity of human capital and inclusive economies.

Beneficiaries: The project’s direct participants are the public sector, private sector, NGOs, researchers and experts of the co-sponsoring economies: Australia, Chinese Taipei, Papua New Guinea, United States, and in addition to this, the participation of Canada, Chile, Mexico and Peru that have studies on gender-based violence, will be promoted. Moreover, there will be coordination with the representatives of the working groups of PPWE, HWG and Human Resources Development Working Group (HRDWG), as well as the organizations of the United Nations: UN Women, World Bank, ILO and WHO.

Studies and workshops will benefit, on a first stage, officers from the public sector, corporations, researchers, NGOs from APEC economies, APEC working groups and participating multinational entities, in the extent that they will count with updated and organized information, and exchange information, strategies and experiences to measure GBV costs and implement best practices to prevent it.

Participants should have knowledge and/or experience in the issues addressed in the workshops (gender, gender-based violence, violence against women, corporate social responsibility, among others). Their participation is essential in the various phases of the project, so its commitment to give continuity to the recommendations made is important. Among the guests are officials as mechanisms of women, health, education and justice of the economies of Australia, Canada, Chile, Chinese Taipei, Mexico, Papua New Guinea, Peru, United States; the Lima Chamber of Commerce, the National Society of Industries and their counterparts from APEC economies; NGOs that have previous experience working in the field of corporate social responsibility as Peru 2021; University San Martin de Porres among others.

Final products –the report, recommendations, workshop and guidebook elaborated to measure GBV costs and implement best practices to revert it- will contribute with each beneficiary as follows:

Policy makers: the studies and guidebooks will provide information and guidelines to measure GBV costs as well as best practices to prevent it that can be implemented in governmental programs or in association with the private sector.

Non-governmental organizations: They will count with the information on GBV costs and methodologies organized to measure it. Besides, they will have information and guidelines on best practices to prevent GBV that can be implemented in the project or programs.

Private sector: It will count with the information on the cost of violence for the society, particularly for the businesses that could be economically affected, due to the absence of workers that are violence victims or perpetrators that have health consequences impeding them to work; imprisonment of perpetrators; decreased presenteeism or performance[1] especially of workers and their close colleagues who attending cannot appropriately focus on work and the expenses related to additional security measures that could be needed at the workplace. This will contribute to make more evident the role that the private sector can fulfill through businesses, or in public-private partnerships. It will also count with guidelines to be involved in violence prevention that will be available in the guidebooks published by the project.

Researchers, academia: the methodologies for the measurement of violence costs will be organized and will make possible to see clearly for its use.

International organizations: the recommendations and practical guidelines could be used for the integration of responsive policies towards GBV in their financing programs and projects.

APEC Fora: The project’s recommendations and guidelines will contribute to see clearly gender considerations in APEC objectives. The PPWE will count with recommendations and instruments for the integration of responsive policies towards GBV in various working groups besides those participating in the project, such as the Emergency Preparedness Working Group (EPWG), Anti-Corruption and Transparency Working Group (ACTWG), Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) and Sustainable Development.

Final beneficiaries are millions of women who can be affected by violence demonstrations in the workplace such as those that occurring in a household environment can negatively impact in the access and permanence at work;  as well as limit their possibilities of personal growth.


[1] Vara, Arístides. The costs of violence against women in the Peruvian formal microenterprises. An estimate of its economic impact [Los costos de la violencia contra las mujeres en las microempresas formales peruanas. Una estimación de su impacto económico]. San Martín University and GIZ, 2015.

Dissemination

The project considers the following activities to disseminate its outcomes and products:

1) Activities carried out during the project’s development will be disseminated, mainly through a website specifically designed for the project within the website of the Ministry of Women and Vulnerable Populations, and through the media and social networks such as Facebook, Twitter, Whatsapp, among others.

2) The investigation on successful experiences executed in APEC economies by the private and public sectors to prevent violence, reduce costs and build capacities in the businesses as well as the report on the measurement and valuation of the economic costs of violence will be published electronically.

3) The guidebook with the workshop recommendations on successful experiences executed in the economies of the APEC economies for the public and private sectors to prevent violence, reduce its costs and build capacities in the businesses will be published electronically. Digital publications will be disseminated in the APEC website, APEC Human Resources Development Working Group web blog. HWG web and the webs of mechanisms of women, Labor Ministries, Ministries of Health, Chamber of Commerce, WHO, ILO, Gender, Equality and Diversity Branch and UN women, among others.

4) Interactive CDs with the presentations and recommendations of the scheduled workshops will be prepared, which will be distributed among the workshop participants.

5) A project’s summary will be prepared and its outcomes will be submitted in the PPWE events that are carried out after the project is finished.

6) The project’s outcomes will be disseminated in other relevant APEC Fora such as: Public-Private Dialogue (PPD) on Inclusive Business (IB), HRDWG, HWG, APEC Economic Leaders’ Meeting and in UN entities such as: UN Women, ILO and WHO.

Gender

Gender-based violence is generally seen as a female issue, however businesses are leaded by men in a larger percentage. In that sense, and as positive action measure, to ensure the participation and involvement of men and women, the following measures will be taken:

-  Two focal points per economy: a man and a woman.

-  The focal points of every economy get in contact with the organizations and initiatives of men who promote non violence against women from their respective economies for their involvement in the project and as informers of studies made and best practices.

-  The representation of every economy in the workshop will be composed by a man and a woman.

-  Announcement materials and dissemination of the project’s activities will include elements to motivate male involvement.

The project addresses gender-based violence that constitutes one of the most serious violations to women’s human rights, their objectives benefit women because contribute to generate information and evidence on GBV costs in the APEC economies, making possible that various stakeholders of the APEC economies be responsive and take measures to prevent it, and in the case of female organizations, have evidence to demand public policies to prevent GBV.

In addition to this, the project will provide guidelines and best practices from the public and private sectors to prevent violence, contributing for different stakeholders of the APEC economies to have practical elements allowing them to get involved in the GBV prevention. From public policies until Public-Private Partnerships or initiatives of community self-management.

Work Plan

Outputs / Activities

Months

Output: Reference terms elaborated and disseminated

August

- Elaborate a Reference Terms proposal for the contracting of the adviser who will prepare the report on the methodologies used in the APEC economies for the measurement and valuation of the economic costs of violence. He/she must review the methodologies of the six APEC economies where have conducted studies in VBG costs: Australia, Canada, Chile, Peru, Vietnam y USA.

- Elaborate a Reference Terms proposal for the contracting of the adviser who will prepare the study on successful experiences carried out in the APEC economies by the private and public sectors to prevent violence, reduce costs and build capacities in the businesses. The best practices that are among the 21 APEC economies will be systematized.

Suggestions from co-sponsors will be collected to elaborate a final proposal of the Reference Terms.

- Dissemination of announcement and receipt of proposals.

Output: contracted advisers

September

- Election of advisers.

- Contracting of advisers

Output: executed studies

October to January

- Progress of the studies (120 calendar days including time to receive feedback).

During the preparation of the studies, the project’s supervisor will establish follow-up meetings among the advisers and focal points of the co-sponsoring economies.

The preliminary version of the studies (60 days) will be conveyed to the focal points of the co-sponsoring economies for their remarks and suggestions.

It will be given a month to receive contributions/recommendations/feedback.

Output: designed and implemented workshops

January to May

The workshops will involve officers and experts of the economies that co-sponsor the project, as well as the economies that have studies on gender-based violence and/or successful experiences to counteract violence. Likewise, focal points of the working groups related to the workshops themes, academia, NGOs and UN organizations will be involved.

- Methodological design of the workshop

- Logistical organization of the workshop

- Contact with potential speakers and participants

- Elaboration of the workshop’s program

- Promotion of the event and invitation for participants

- Elaboration of the documents for the workshop

- Development of the workshop (the second half of May)

- Elaboration of CDs with presentations and recommendations from the workshop to prevent violence and reduce costs and build capacities in the businesses.

- Dissemination of the workshop’s development in the media and social networks through press releases and articles.

Output: publications elaborated and disseminated

May to July

- Digital publication of the report on the methodologies used in the APEC economies for measurement and valuation of the economic costs of violence.

- Digital publication of the study on successful experiences executed in the APEC economies by the public and private sectors to prevent violence, reduce its costs and strengthen businesses.

- Elaboration of a guidebook with guidelines and recommendations to improve the measurement and valuation of the economic costs of violence.

- Digital publication of a guidebook with guidelines and recommendations to improve the measurement and valuation of the economic costs of violence.

- Elaboration of a guidebook with Best Practices and Recommendations to prevent violence, reduce its costs and build capacities in the businesses.

- Digital publication of a guidebook with Best Practices and Recommendations to prevent violence, reduce its costs and build capacities in the businesses.

- Dissemination of digital publications in the APEC website and the websites of the institutions related to the themes discussed by the participating economies.

Output: disseminated outcomes of the project

July to November

Elaboration of the project’s summary and its outcomes to be submitted in the events of the PPWE that are carried out after the project is finished and in other important fora

Output: elaborated reports

Submission of monitoring reports

February 2017 and August 2017

  Submission of the final report

January 2017

Risks

The risks associated with project implementation are detailed as follow:

1) Research Management Risk. It has drawn up a work plan schedule providing that studies may take longer than expected, since not all information is available and can rely on sources who are in different economies. To mitigate this problem, we are going to get in touch from the beginning of the project with other stakeholders and involve them in the development of studies since its formulation.

2) Low interest in participation. A communication and marketing to encourage participation strategy will be developed, identifying focal point for each economy.

3) Low interest in using results. To mitigate this risk there will be a dissemination strategy that encourages interest in the products of the project. In addition, we are going to properly select participants that disseminate the results.

4) Delays or untimely preparation. As phases are sequential (reports, workshops, publications and dissemination), some delays can appear, affecting the following. To mitigate this problem, the work plan schedule is elaborate to take this risk into account for action to possible setbacks that they may be developed. It is also necessary to make a realistic estimation and have information on the times involving the tasks for each activity (eg visa formalities or permits) and make strict monitoring of deadlines.

Monitoring and Evaluation

The monitoring and evaluation plan will aim to measure progress towards the two objectives of the project and ensure its progress.

Results chain

Indicators of Achievement

Means of Verification

Objectives

To increase knowledge on the measurement and valuation of the economic costs of violence against women in APEC economies.

Number of initiatives taken by APEC economies using or referencing recommendations

Goal: At least 1 per participant.

Number of initiatives taken by APEC fora using or referencing recommendations

Goal: At least 1 per fora.

Post workshops surveys for feedback (August 2017).

Events reports (the month after the event)

To disseminate and exchange successful experiences in the public and private sectors to prevent violence, reduce costs and build capacity in enterprises.

Number of initiatives taken by APEC economies using or referencing recommendations

Goal: At least 1 per participant.

Number of initiatives taken by APEC fora using or referencing recommendations

Goal: At least 1 per fora.

Post workshops surveys for  feedback (August 2017).

Events reports (the month after the event)

Outcomes

Prioritized Economies and co-sponsors involved in all phases of the project.

Number of APEC economies engaged

Goal: At least 4 economies.

Feedback notes verification in each phase

Recommendations identified in the methodologies workshop

No. of recommendations identified

Goal: At least 3 recommendations.

Workshop report (June 2017)

Recommendations identified in the good practice workshop

No. of recommendations identified

Goal: At least 3 recommendations.

Workshop report (June 2017)

Workshop participants acquire new knowledge and methodologies and take interest in the need for measuring the cost of the VBG.

N°  of participants that improve their knowledge

Goal: At least 60% of the participants.

N° of participants that give a positive value to the workshop

Goal: At least 60% of the participants.

Application of a survey input.

Application of a survey at the end of the workshop identified: knowledge acquired, level of satisfaction / participants and recommendations.

Best Practices Workshop participants acquire new knowledge and take interest in their implementation.

Number of participants that improve their knowledge

Goal: At least 60% of the participants.

Number of participants who positive valorize the workshop outcome

Goal: At least 60% of the participants.

Initial survey application

Final survey application at the end of the workshop identified: knowledge acquired,

level of satisfaction / participants and recommendations

Achievements and results of the project are discussed at the meeting of PPWE 2017

No. of issues discussed

Goal: Two issues discussed.

Reports prepared (the month after the event)

Event memory

Achievements and results of the project are discussed in APEC fora

No. of events that discussed project outputs

Goal: Two events.

Reports prepared (the month after the event)

Event memory

Outputs

Terms of reference prepared and disseminated

No. ToR made

Deadlines met

Reports of activities

Verifying compliance with the work plan

Final Report made

N° Report made

Deadlines met

Report documents

Verifying compliance with the work plan

Regional Study of GBV economic costs

Number of studies

Deadlines met

Studies related documentation

Verifying compliance with the work plan

Workshop implemented

Number of participants

Goal: 20 participants

Attendance reports.

Publications elaborated

N° publications elaborated

Goal: 2 publications

publications elaborated related documentation

Publications disseminated

Number of web sites that disseminate publications

Goal: 2 publications

Reports prepared

Project results disseminated

Number of forums in which the results are presented

Goal;: 3 forum

Prepared reports and memories of events

Linkages

Engagement: The project will involve, in all of its phases, relevant groups inside and outside APEC. On the one hand, it will promote that the focal points of the co-sponsor and participants economies in the project involve the key stakeholders of their economies. On the other hand, it will involve PPWE, HWG and HRDWG APEC work groups, as well as other stakeholders as UNW, ILO, WHO, IDB and GIZ which are linked to the themes of the project and they will be asked for their feedback on the research process, they will be invited to participate in workshops, and to disseminate products project. In addition, at the beginning of the project we will inquire about groups or institutions within and outside APEC that are working the issues proposed in the project as a way to get them involved.

Previous Work: The theme of the GBV has been poorly worked within APEC. One of the findings presented in the "APEC Women and The Economy Dashboard" [1] is that APEC needs to increase their efforts in some areas in order to provide equal opportunities for women. One of them is theGBV. It is found that more than half of APEC economies have inadequate frameworks to protect women from domestic violence or face problems in their implementation. An antecedent of the treatment of the violence issue by APEC Fora groups is the publication of "Healthy Women, Healthy Economies Policy toolkit" [2] in which it identifies five barriers related to health that limit the participation of women in the workforce in the APEC economies, one of which is gender-based violence. This is worked in three ways: sexual harassment in the workplace, migrants and intimate partner violence. This document is complemented by a literature review [3].

A specific treatment guideline of GBV is provided in the Appendix 2 of the strategic PPWE plan, where it mentions that women face barriers that limit their participation in the economy so it is stated that "the economies of the APEC in all of their Forums should consider and make efforts to increase women's access to decent work and lifestyles (...) and laws against discrimination and harassment, including specific laws for the workplace; and the most importantly introduce awareness campaigns and prevention of gender-based violence".

Despite there are several studies in economies inside and outside of the APEC  on the costs of violence to women we are not duplicating efforts because one of the objectives of the project is to systematize the methodologies used by these studies. In relation to good practices, there are diverse experiences that the project aims to systematize.

APEC’s Comparative Advantage:  APEC is an adequate financial source for this type of project for many reasons:

1) The topics in this project have incidence in the development of human capital, a central theme in the 2015 Declaration of the APEC Leaders[4].

2) The project contributes to the elimination of barriers that limit the participation of women in the labor market in accordance with the APEC commitment to "promote the engagement of all the sectors and segments in our society, specially women (...) to achieve an inclusive growth"[5].

3) The project's objectives strengthen the PPWE efforts to integrate gender-sensible policies with different workgroups.

At the same time, we have the support of co-sponsor economies and the participating economies, in which many efforts are being taken to measure the cost of gender-based violence, as is the case in Australia, Canada, Chile and United States, and to implement good practices to prevent them, like in the case of Peru where the certificate of Seal Company Segura, Free from Violence and Discrimination against Women (Sello Empresa Segura, Libre de Violencia y Discriminación contra la mujer) has been implemented.

Sustainability

In this project we will implement different measures to guarantee its impact after it has ended.

- We will ensure the dissemination and exposure of the project's final product.

- We will ensure that the final products remain on the APEC's website and the websites of relevant institutions in APEC economies, as well as links to the topics covered in the project.

- We will promote the replication and dissemination of the participants of the workshops in their home economies.

- In coordination with the PPWE, we will disseminate the results and recommendations of the project in various APEC groups to be incorporated as a topic of interest in the various APEC forums.

- In coordination with the PPWE, we will promote the implementation of the project's recommendations and the adoption of best practices.

- The hosting and maintenance of the Project website will be assumed by the Ministry of Women and Vulnerable Populations.

- It is generated multi-stakeholder platform partnerships institutions public and private sector in order to give sustainability actions.

- A sustainability strategy is the institutionalization of seals like the Seal Company Free from Violence and Discrimination against Women. 

The progress of the outcomes and impact will be measured through the following actions:

-  A feedback survey post workshop will be applied to the participants of the good-practices workshop.

-  The memories of the events of the working groups of the APEC will be reviewed to ascertain to what extent the GBV are incorporated as a topic of interest and the project's recommendations are implemented.

-  The final report of the project and its evaluation will serve as input for the formulation of new projects that allows a deeper understanding of the measurement of the cost of GBV and its prevention.

-  Good practices of participating economies in the project will be strengthened such as the Seal Company Segura, Free from Violence and Discrimination against Women (Sello Empresa Segura, Libre de Violencia y Discriminación), a policy of the Ministry of Women and Vulnerable Populations, which is a public-private strategic alliance, which articulates with the objectives of the project and will contribute to its continuity.

Project Overseers

Silvia Loli Espinoza
Directora General contra la Violencia de Género
Ministerio de la Mujer y Poblaciones Vulnerable.
Tel:  511-6261600
E-mail:  sloli@mimp.gob.pe

Second Point of Contact: Mery Vargas Cuno
Directora de Políticas para una Vida Libre de Violencia
inisterio de la Mujer y Poblaciones Vulnerable
Tel:  511-6261600
E-mail: mvargas@mimp.gob.pe

Cost Efficiency

Not Applicable.

Drawdown Timetable

Not Applicable.

Direct Labour

Not Applicable.

Waivers

Not Applicable.

Are there any supporting document attached?

No 
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Version: 5.0 
Created at 04/08/2016 15:43  by Lucy Phua 
Last modified at 11/09/2017 17:15  by Lucy Phua 
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