Project Title

APEC Water-Energy Nexus Expert Workshop 

Project Year

2015   

Project Number

EWG 07 2015A 

Project Session

Session 1   

Project Type

Standard 

Project Status

Project in Implementation   
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Project No.

EWG 07 2015A 

Project Title

APEC Water-Energy Nexus Expert Workshop 

Project Status

Project in Implementation 

Publication (if any)

 

Fund Account

APEC Support Fund 

Sub-fund

ASF: Energy Efficiency 

Project Year

2015 

Project Session

Session 1 

APEC Funding

100,000 

Co-funding Amount

25,000 

Total Project Value

125,000 

Sponsoring Forum

Energy Working Group (EWG) 

Topics

Energy 

Committee

SOM Steering Committee on Economic and Technical Cooperation (SCE) 

Other Fora Involved

 

Other Non-APEC Stakeholders Involved

 

Proposing Economy(ies)

United States 

Co-Sponsoring Economies

Australia; China; Japan 

Expected Start Date

01/11/2015 

Expected Completion Date

31/12/2016 

Project Proponent Name 1

Scott M Smouse 

Job Title 1

Chair, Expert Group on Clean Fossil Energy 

Organization 1

US Department of Energy 

Postal Address 1

1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585, USA 

Telephone 1

1-412 7202679 

Fax 1

Not Applicable 

Email 1

scott.smouse@hq.doe.gov 

Project Proponent Name 2

Not Applicable 

Job Title 2

Not Applicable 

Organization 2

Not Applicable 

Postal Address 2

Not Applicable 

Telephone 2

Not Applicable 

Fax 2

Not Applicable 

Email 2

Not Applicable 

Declaration

Scott M Smouse 

Project Summary

An APEC project EWG 08 2014A: Water-Energy Nexus: Coal-Based Power Generation and Conversion - Saving Water is getting underway. That project will collect and share information on developments to make coal-based energy generation more efficient and less-water intensive, on recovery and reuse of water from coal-based energy production, and on policy and regulatory developments in APEC member economies related to the water-energy nexus for coal-based energy production.

This proposed Expert Workshop will build on information generated and lessons learned in the above project, and provide expert feedback on the report and input to the future work to be proposed by the EGCFE.

Coordination between the two projects will aid in identifying invited speakers who are not only knowledgeable in this field of activity, but also capable of identifying critical future directions of research and analyses needed within the APEC region on the water-energy nexus field of activities spanning from technology through policy to regulations.

Relevance

In our civilization, water and energy are intertwined. Most energy production and conversion methods need large amounts of water, and most methods of producing and delivering fresh water require significant amounts of energy to recover, transport (sometimes across vast distances), and treat the water.  For example, in the United States, the California Aqueduct, which transports snowmelt across two mountain ranges to thirsty coastal cities, is the biggest electricity consumer in the state. China is planning to transport water from three river basins in the south thousands of miles to the water-poor north, which will require vast amounts of energy. The rapid build up of coal-fired power plants and other industrial uses of coal will impinge on freshwater supplies. A typical 500-megawatt (MW) coal-fired power plant uses over 12 million gallons per hour of water for cooling and other process requirements. Policymakers need to understand such links and the trade-offs between water and energy, termed the nexus.

An APEC project covering these issues, Water-Energy Nexus: Coal-Based Power Generation and Conversion - Saving Water (EWG 08 2014A) is now underway. It aims to collect and share information on developments to make coal-based energy generation more efficient and less-water intensive, on recovery and reuse of water from coal-based energy production, and on policy and regulatory developments in APEC member economies related to the water-energy nexus for coal-based energy production. Understanding the water-energy nexus and proactively addressing potential energy system vulnerabilities stemming from water resource dependency is important for all economies reliant on coal to meet their energy and economic development needs.

The Expert Workshop proposed in this follow-up project will build on information generated and lessons learned in the water-energy nexus project. This project's contractor will be in close contact with the contractor undertaking the above project, as far as the scope and content of the Workshop is concerned. Coordination between the two projects will aid in identifying invited speakers who are not only knowledgeable in this field of activity, but also capable of identifying critical future directions of research and analyses needed within the APEC region on the water-energy nexus field of activities spanning from technology through policy to regulations.

The project is to share information on the latest technology developments and best practices, and policy measures, related to water use for coal-power generation and production of SNG and chemicals from coal. It falls within Rank 2 of the APEC Funding Criteria for all Projects 2014, under “Projects that directly support the APEC Leaders' Growth Strategy,” relative to “Promotion of Renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency and Low Carbon Technology,” and “Promoting Green Growth.”  Also, APEC Environment Ministers recognized the criticality of water in economic development in their 2012 meeting, by stating “We recognize that water is at the core of sustainable development and highlight its link to economic growth, poverty reduction, food security, a better sanitary state of the environment and ecosystems protection.”

Objectives

The objectives of this Expert Workshop (in an economy to be selected) will be:

a) To discuss and evaluate the priorities identified in EWG 08 2014A project findings, and to share up-to-date knowledge and experience.

b) To discuss future work in this area and develop recommendations, including capacity building needed on technologies, on the economics of measures addressing water-energy nexus issues, and on needed policy/regulatory structures.

The workshop structure, content and selection of speakers will reflect a special focus on the needs of developing economies.

Alignment

The Declaration by APEC Leaders, meeting in Bali, Indonesia in October 2013, recognizing the challenge presented by resource scarcity, included a statement of their intention to “address the nexus of water, energy and food security through the promotion of integrated policies and collaborative approaches.” This project is part of the response to the Leaders’ mandate, extending the breadth of information gained via resort to information exchange in an APEC forum among experts in the field.

The Energy Working Group’s mission statement contained in its draft strategic plan 2014-2018 includes the objective “to build the capacity of APEC members to strengthen domestic and regional energy security while lowering the carbon intensity of energy supply and use across the region.” Among the key tasks that it cites to support this mission is “undertaking new analysis, research, and demonstration on the water-energy nexus.” This project is formulated as part of the EGCFE’s planned response to this EWG mandate relative to fossil energy production and use.

TILF/ASF Justification

The objectives described above are specifically aimed at supporting the capacity building needs of APEC developing economies through the sharing of information on how to make their coal-based energy systems more efficient both in themselves and in their use of water. This will require a greater degree of coordination between government entities responsible for fossil power generation and those responsible for water resources and water management.

Beneficiaries and Outputs

Outputs: The existing EWG 08 2014A project intends to produce a report containing information on the latest developments to make coal-based energy systems, including power generation and production of SNG and chemicals, more efficient and less water-intensive. Its report will set the scene by describing the nature and magnitude of the water-energy nexus, drawing from practical examples in regions where water is scarce, and highlighting the technical, economic and institutional issues faced by power generation in such regions. A number of case studies will describe how specific power generating plants in such arid regions manage their water needs.

This follow-up project will build upon the body of knowledge being developed in the EWG 08 2014A project by means of an exchange of the latest information among experts in the field. The outputs will consist of the proceedings of the expert workshop and a synthesis of the workshop findings. They are expected to include substantive suggestions regarding the future shape of APEC work on the nexus, and to add emphasis to the role of APEC by making detailed proposals on the content of such work.

Most energy production and conversion methods need large amounts of water, and most methods of producing fresh water require energy. Policy-makers need to understand the links and trade-offs between water and energy, termed the nexus. An APEC project covering these issues: Water-Energy Nexus: Coal-Based Power Generation and Conversion - Saving Water is underway. That project will collect and share information on developments to make coal-based energy generation more efficient and less-water intensive, on recovery and reuse of water from coal-based energy production, and on policy and regulatory developments in APEC member economies related to the water-energy nexus for coal-based energy production.

The proposed Expert Workshop will build on information generated and lessons learned in the above project. This project's contractor will be in close contact with the contractor undertaking the first water-energy nexus project, as far as the scope and content of the Workshop is concerned. Coordination between the two projects will aid in identifying invited speakers who are not only knowledgeable in this field of activity, but also capable of identifying critical future directions of research and analyses needed within the APEC region on the water-energy nexus field of activities, spanning from technology through policy to regulations.

Outcomes: The major outcome desired from this project is a growing recognition by individual economies of the need to a) consider the water-energy nexus in their energy planning, b) develop and enact government policy and regulatory measures to encourage, and where necessary require, deployment of more efficient and less water-intensive technologies for coal-based power generation and production of SNG and chemicals in their new energy facilities, and for retrofit of existing facilities where possible and feasible. The discussion and implementation of plans by governments to institute such measures may be expected to stimulate development and deployment of more efficient and less water-intensive coal-based technologies by the engineering and technology supply sectors. Interaction of governments and the relevant industry sector players during the development of plans to manage with the water-energy nexus could be a positive factor in ensuring the technical and economic feasibility and efficiency of approaches to dealing with the problem.

Beneficiaries: The target speakers and audience are expected to include:

a) Key government officials at the policy level, with relevant technical and economic expertise, who are involved in decision-making on freshwater resources management (production, transportation, and distribution), particularly with regard to the use of water for fossil energy-based industry; and on the environmental and regulatory issues specific to the water-energy nexus.

b) Institutes and academia involved in economic and policy analysis in this area, such as the World Resources Institute, the World Policy Institute, the Pacific Institute, and the Schlumberger SBC Energy Institute

c) Representatives of relevant industry sectors with interests in this topic.

d) Other international fora active in this topic area (e.g., IEA/OECD, UNESCO).

Careful selection of expert speakers and session chairs for the Expert Workshop will be important to the success of the project. EWG and EGCFE representatives will be asked to identify key contact persons in their economies knowledgeable in this topic area, who could be invited to participate and/or make presentations.

The project RFP will clearly stipulate the knowledge/experience in the water-energy nexus field required of the successful bidder, the need for engaging the categories of beneficiaries identified above, and experience in organization and management of expert workshops in relevant fields.

The beneficiaries will benefit in a number of ways:

a) Energy, coal, and power generation policymakers will benefit from up-to-date information on clean coal technology demonstrations and deployments aimed at reducing water use in power generation and production of SNG and chemicals.

b) Governments and the coal-based energy sector in developing APEC economies will benefit from capacity building through improved knowledge and access to current information.

c) The engineering and technology supply sectors will be better placed to identify new opportunities for deployment of more efficient and less water-intensive coal-based energy technologies in developing APEC economies.

d) The public stands to benefit through reduced emissions of environmental pollutants due to the use of more efficient and less polluting coal technologies, as well as less risk of water scarcity in susceptible regions.

Future generations may benefit from increased sustainability due to better availability of water resources, as well as the beneficial effects on global climate of reduced accumulation of CO2 in the atmosphere due to cleaner and more efficient coal use.

Dissemination

One key element of the success of any APEC project is its visibility within and beyond APEC, which depends to a significant extent on the dissemination strategy. It is proposed that following contractor selection and during the launching of the work the Project Overseer should make a brief presentation to the Energy Working Group during one of its meetings, preferably prior to the launch.

When the project is complete and the outputs available, APEC activities in the water-energy nexus area would gain more visibility through announcements by SCE and Senior Officials if this can be arranged. This would improve the standing of the final report and the probability of effective action on the recommendations.

The products of this project, including the final report and other materials, will be posted on the APEC, EWG, and EGCFE websites for viewing and downloading, and linked to other websites dealing with water issues related to coal-based energy production.

The results of the project will be shared with the Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF), the Global CCS Institute, the IEA/OECD, and other international fora active in this area.

The project results are targeted mainly at the potential beneficiaries identified in Section 7 above.

There is no intention to sell outputs arising from this project.

Gender

In many developing economies, women are the ones who are most affected by energy poverty, spending a great deal of time on wood and fuel collection. It is important to seek their perspective in policy making, and recognize the importance of their role in exploring sustainable energy solutions. Recognizing how local water resources affect men and women in the community would help to successfully integrate gender implications, both in water resource management, and in energy development that depends upon water resources and can conflict over demand for freshwater resources. Involving both men and women in the design and implementation of interventions can help to identify effective new solutions to water problems, increasing project effectiveness and efficiency. Some United Nations documents[1] highlight the issues involved.

The EWG and EGCFE always encourage participation of women from all APEC members in all its committees, projects, and activities. Women have served in the past as the principal investigators/lead authors of several EGCFE projects. Participation by women in the project steering committee will be encouraged, and the committee will encourage women to participate actively in the project.

The project RFP will stress the need to involve women in both planning and implementation stages. In the evaluation of submitted bids in response to the project RFP, specific attention will be given to qualified women proposed by the bidder. The EGCFE members involved will ensure that the winning submission adheres to the priorities of the Framework for the Integration of Women in APEC (“Accelerate the progress of integrating women in the mainstream of APEC processes and activities” and “Promote and encourage the involvement of women in all APEC fora”). The APEC Framework, as well as the Gender Analysis Guide and other relevant documents, will be made available to those involved in all aspects of the project; their application will be monitored throughout the project.

Having an adequate, dependable, and efficient supply of energy and clean water in the APEC Region benefits men and women equally with regards to economic development and protection of the environment. To the extent that the results of the project assist in reducing stress between water resources and energy availability, women in developing APEC economies may benefit through more adequate availability of provision of water resources and an improved environment through cleaner, more efficient coal use.


[1] http://www.unwater.org/topics/water-and-gender/en/

http://www.unido.org/fileadmin/user_media_upgrade/What_we_do/Topics/Women_and_Youth/GUIDANCENOTE_FINAL_WEB.pdf

http://www.undp.org/content/dam/undp/library/gender/Gender%20and%20Environment/PB4-AP-Gender-and-Energy.pdf

Work Plan

The project will be conducted by a contractor with up-to-date knowledge and expertise in the areas of focus of the water-energy nexus. The consultant will be responsible for organizing the workshop and providing the proceedings a synthesis of the results. He/she will be made aware of the potential risks and work the EGCFE to avoid or minimize them.  The consultant will also be informed that as APEC owns the copyrights of the project's outputs, all outputs (documents, multimedia, proceedings and reports) generated need to comply with the APEC publishing, logo and copyright guidelines before any payment is made. Basic 'Final Report' guidelines are found in the APEC Publications Guidelines. Workshop proceedings should be uploaded to the APEC Publications Database website and to the APEC EGCFE website.

The contractor will serve under the guidance of an APEC Project Steering Committee, which will be composed of EGCFE members, and possibly other government and industry representatives. The timeline will be the following:

a) November 2015: Issuance of an RFP.

b) January 2016: Selection of contractor to organize the Expert Workshop.

c) February 2016: Contractor submits an organizational plan for consideration by the project steering committee, consisting of proposed workshop program, suggested names of expert speakers from the public and private sector, and proposed timetable for the workshop and other program activities.

d) Spring 2016: APEC representatives invited to nominate experts to attend the Workshop.

e) June 2016: Contractor submits final proposed program and list of speakers and participants for the Workshop for approval.

f) September 2016: Workshop held.

g) October 2016: Proceedings of the Workshop and synthesis report summarizing the Workshop, including presentations, speakers' documents, briefing papers, and other relevant information, prepared and submitted to APEC for publication.  The report will contain suggestions, formed with input from the workshop participants, for follow-on work on water-energy nexus issues.  

As noted above, the present intention is to select a contractor by means of competitive bidding on the basis of an APEC RFP. However, consideration may be given, subject to agreement from APEC, that an efficient way to proceed with organizing the workshop may be to use the same contractor as was selected to carry out the first water-energy nexus project EWG 08 2014A, now under way. This would of course require that the contractor have appropriate experience in putting together international workshops of this kind.

Risks

Potential risks that the Project may face include:

a) Timely identification and selection of the most appropriate contractor via an RFP.

b) Timely decision on the scope and content of the workshop program and related events.

c)  Identification and selection of appropriate speakers for the workshop.

d)  Relevance and usefulness of the workshop presentations.

e)  Timely project completion and publication of the results.

f) Appropriate follow-up on implementation of the project recommendations.

As the project progresses, additional risks may emerge requiring mitigation and management.

The EGCFE has developed a set of criteria and scoring methodology for assessment of responses to RFPs and consultant selection. Use of this process facilitates objective assessment by a team of EWG/EGCFE experts and achievement of consensus on the appropriate choice among RFP responders.

The RFP will emphasize the importance of early action to develop the workshop program in sufficient detail to facilitate the identification of appropriate speakers and session chairs. This will be the key to success in lining up these important actors at an early stage. The organizational plan is the first deliverable following contractor selection. Its timeliness, quality and relevance will in turn serve to reduce the other risks identified above.

Progress in the ongoing first APEC project in the water-energy nexus field will be an important contributor to successfully scoping the workshop program.

Following consultant selection, the project steering committee and the consultant selected to carry out the project will be aware of the potential risks, as well as others that may be identified in the process, and will work together to avoid or minimize them. Appropriate follow-up will be discussed in the EGCFE and EWG.

Monitoring and Evaluation

Short-term indicators of success of the project will be:

a) The number of participants in the workshop;

b) The number of APEC economies represented;

c) The number of women participants and of those playing an active role (e.g. presenter, session chair etc.), and

d) The response to a questionnaire concerning the quality of the presentations and discussions, containing a quantitative rating such as a score between 0 and 5 for each item. This will be provided to the participants at the beginning of the workshop, with a request to complete and submit it at the end. The completed questionnaires will remain anonymous.

The best measure of success in the medium term will be the utilization of the combination of information contained in the Water-Energy Nexus project report supplemented by the new information developed by the Expert Workshop. To the extent that the results of the project assist in helping governments and industry to develop and implement strategies and policies to reduce stress between water resources and commercial energy availability, all APEC economies would benefit through more adequate availability of provision of water resources for consumption, agriculture, and other uses along with a cleaner environment.

This project will build on the ongoing water-energy nexus project by providing expert feedback on the report and input to the future work to be proposed by the EGCFE. It will also benefit from relevant work in progress elsewhere, and active coordination will prevent duplication. The final project report and proceedings of the Expert Workshop will be made available for downloading from the APEC and EGCFE web sites. The results of the project will be shared with the IEA/OECD and other international fora active in this area.

Evaluation indicators for the outputs could include the number of APEC economies who introduce substantive work on aspects of the water-energy nexus in their economy, and the number and nature of new proposals for dealing with related issues identified.

Feedback from members of the project steering committee, EGCFE members, and EWG members will be an indicator of success in the medium term.  The longer-term measures of success will be use of the project results by developing APEC economies in supporting their decision-making on how to handle the implications of the water-energy nexus and what policy measures are implemented to conserve scarce water resources while developing needed clean and efficient coal-fired power generation and production of SNG and chemical from coal. Feedback on this will be sought via significant coal-using EGCFE and EWG members, and from coal technology and water supply industry experts.

The response to question 9 above dealt with the measures taken to ensure the participation and engagement of women in the project. As regards gender, the degree of women involvement, in terms of responsibility and numbers, can be evaluated objectively at the conclusion of the project. Of particular interest in this regard, apart from the number and qualifications of women experts in the project, will be their input to the analysis, and the consequences of their input for the project results and conclusions, both as far as gender is concerned and in general.

Linkages

In addition to the obvious linkage with the first water-energy nexus project EWG 08 2014A, a self-funded APEC project under the APEC Energy Working Group involving the energy-water nexus is being developed entitled “Clean and Efficient Use of Energy and Water Resources: Initiating an APEC Road Map and Best Practices for the Energy-Water Nexus”. In that project, the United States and China, under APEC’s Energy Smart Communities’ Initiative (ESCI), will develop modelling capabilities to examine water use in energy production and energy use in water production to identify potential vulnerabilities, particularly in urban areas. The goals are to 1) standardize definitions and data collection to improve data and analysis, 2) gather relevant data from APEC economies, 3) determine data gaps, and 4) identify potential vulnerabilities along with adaptive strategies to help mitigate energy-water nexus impacts.

Coordination of the activities in the EGCFE energy-water nexus initiative described in this Proposal with the above project will be assured. The two projects approach the nexus from different viewpoints, with the emphasis of the EGCFE project being on technological issues for the more efficient use of water in energy production, while that of the EWG project is identification of potential vulnerabilities, particularly in urban areas.

The project has a potential to lead to future inward investment in projects in the coal-based energy sectors in developing APEC economies. The earlier deployment of clean and more efficient coal technologies for new energy facilities will also interface with APEC projects on carbon capture and sequestration (CCS), because plants using these technologies can be built so that they are capable of adding CCS in the future if necessary. In a number of APEC regions, the availability of water resources can be a barrier to the development of coal-based energy facilities.  This project may help to define ways to address such obstacles and facilitate investments.

For these reasons, APEC is an appropriate forum to undertake this project and this is a very appropriate use of APEC funds.

Sustainability

Taken together with the results of the previous projects cited above, the project’s long-term intended impacts are to put developing APEC economies with rapidly growing use of coal for electricity generation and production of SNG and chemicals in position to deploy more efficient clean coal technologies as effectively and economically as possible, and to build professional capabilities and capacity for achieving this. Long-term sustainability is a key objective of the EWG forum. The results of the project are likely to identify more detailed work needed on specific aspects of clean coal technology deployment in developing APEC economies, including the availability and utilization of needed water resources, which could be the object of future APEC projects. The results are likely to identify more clearly the barriers to CCT deployment due to the water-energy nexus in the situations different APEC economies find themselves, and further APEC work may be necessary to resolve the issues and find the most efficient way forward.

The project RFP will include a requirement that the chosen contractor draw conclusions from the work to date as to what further needs for APEC involvement the assessment has identified, and provide proposals regarding how best to proceed in the next phase of APEC water-energy nexus activities. These proposals should address issues that may arise in the implementation of the final report's recommendations, with particular emphasis on developing economies.

Project Overseers

The main point of contact will be Scott M. Smouse of the United States Department of Energy

Mr. Smouse has over 30 years experience in nearly every aspect of fossil energy utilization and power generation, especially coal-based technologies. Since 1996, he has coordinated all of NETL’s international activities, including working with senior Department and other U.S. government officials on a wide variety of bilateral and multilateral initiatives and projects. He has worked with senior government officials, industry, and academia from over 30 countries on a wide range of cooperative research, development, and demonstration projects; technology and market assessments; technology transfer; and policy analyses, primarily related to fossil energy production and utilization. He has chaired the APEC’s Expert Group on Clean Fossil Energy for about a dozen years and has served as the Lead Coordinator on Annex IV: Energy & Environmental Control Technologies under the Fossil Energy Cooperation Protocol between U.S. DOE and China’s Ministry of Science & Technology (MOST) since 2001. Also, he served a technical expert and U.S. representative on the Power Generation and Transmission and Cleaner Fossil Energy Task Forces of the Asia Pacific Partnership on Clean Development and Climate. He is also a representative to the Power Working Group under the Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership of the Clean Energy Ministerial.  He is a member of the U.S. Executive Committee to the International Energy Agency’s Clean Coal Centre and the Executive Board of the U.S.-China Energy & Environmental Technology Center.

Mr. Smouse also provides crosscutting support to Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF), especially the Capacity Building and Finance Task Forces. He was the lead author of the international sections of the 2010 report by the Carbon Capture & Storage Task Force to U.S. President Obama. He coordinates NETL’s interaction with other organizations with international objectives, including United States Energy Association, World Energy Council, Atlantic Council, Edison Electric Institute, and multilateral development banks. He holds a B.S. in Chemistry from Fairmont State College and a M.S. in Fuel Science (Combustion) from Penn State University. He previously held several positions in the U.S. private sector, with Pope, Evans & Robbins, Inc.; DUSCO Division of Dearborn Chemical Company, a W.R. Grace subsidiary; and Babcock & Wilcox Company.

Cost Efficiency

Not Applicable.

Drawdown Timetable

Not Applicable.

Direct Labour

Direct labour funded by APEC will consist of the consultant team and their secretarial assistance. Their total estimated hours are shown.

Dispensation of funds for consultant’s fees will be as follows: 20% upon submission of organizational plan for consideration by the project steering committee, 30% on approval of the final proposed program and list of speakers and participants for the Workshop, 30% on holding a successful Workshop, and the remaining 20% on publication by APEC of the Workshop proceedings and synthesis report.

Waivers

Not Applicable.

Are there any supporting document attached?

No 
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Gender

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