Project Title

Regional Cooperation on Drought Prediction Science to Support Disaster Preparedness and Management 

Project Year

2013   

Project Number

PPSTI 04 2013A 

Project Session

Session 2   

Project Type

Standard 

Project Status

Completed Project   
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Project No.

PPSTI 04 2013A 

Project Title

Regional Cooperation on Drought Prediction Science to Support Disaster Preparedness and Management 

Project Status

Completed Project 

Publication (if any)

 

Fund Account

APEC Support Fund 

Sub-fund

ASF: Human Security 

Project Year

2013 

Project Session

Session 2 

APEC Funding

108,720 

Co-funding Amount

199,800 

Total Project Value

308,520 

Sponsoring Forum

APEC Policy Partnership on Science, Technology and Innovation (PPSTI) 

Topics

Science and Technology 

Committee

SOM Steering Committee on Economic and Technical Cooperation (SCE) 

Other Fora Involved

 

Other Non-APEC Stakeholders Involved

 

Proposing Economy(ies)

Korea 

Co-Sponsoring Economies

Canada; China; Hong Kong, China; Malaysia; Russia; Thailand 

Expected Start Date

01/07/2013 

Expected Completion Date

31/12/2013 

Project Proponent Name 1

Yang Hyoung-Keun 

Job Title 1

Head, External Affairs Department 

Organization 1

APEC Climate Center 

Postal Address 1

1463 U-dong, Haeundae-gu, Busan 612-020, Korea 

Telephone 1

82-51 7453920 

Fax 1

82-51 7453949 

Email 1

hky@apcc21.org 

Project Proponent Name 2

Not Applicable 

Job Title 2

Not Applicable 

Organization 2

Not Applicable 

Postal Address 2

Not Applicable 

Telephone 2

Not Applicable 

Fax 2

Not Applicable 

Email 2

Not Applicable 

Declaration

Yang Hyoung-Keun 

Project Summary

This project aims to reduce the vulnerability of APEC member economies to the hazardous impacts of drought by hosting an international symposium with the theme Regional Cooperation on Drought Prediction Science to Support Disaster Preparedness and Management, to be held in Jakarta, Indonesia on 11-13 November, 2013. The 3-day conference will include presentations on drought prediction at multiple time-scales, drought impact assessment, the application of advance climate information to decision-making, the development of innovative Early Warning Systems, and methods for disseminating drought information to relevant stakeholders. Conference participants will be invited from National Meteorological and Hydrological Services (NMHSs), research institutions, government agencies, the private sector, and NGOs. Furthermore, the project will also deliver a structured training exercise on using drought indices along with spatial mapping of drought affected areas to build the capacity of scientists from developing economies to identify and assess drought vulnerability.

Relevance

Drought is a climate phenomenon wherein a region experiences less than normal precipitation over an extended period of time. Prolonged occurrences of drought can present significant challenges to agriculture, forestry, water resources management, urban planning, and food security. Climate change will increase the frequency, duration, and intensity of drought events, and to face these mounting challenges, economies and societies must develop systems to better prepare for and manage droughts and other natural disasters. Reliable drought prediction and monitoring enable decision-makers to make well-reasoned management decisions, coordinate responses of government agencies, direct emergency relief, and reduce vulnerability to drought-related hazards; thereby realizing the APEC mission of protection of human security in the region. Affirming the need to better prepare for drought, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Secretary-General, Michel Jarraud, has asserted “We need to move away from a piecemeal, crisis-driven approach and develop integrated risk-based national drought policies.”[1]

This project proposes to conduct an international symposium that will explore the importance of advance climate information for supporting drought preparedness and disaster management. This event will be the first of its kind to specifically examine drought in the Asia-Pacific region. APEC has a unique advantage in conducting this activity because economies in Southeast Asia, which are projected to experience increasingly severe drought conditions under climate change, will be able to learn from the experiences of economies that have historically suffered from drought, such as the United States, Australia, and China. Over three days, the event will examine topics such as the latest innovative techniques in drought and seasonal climate prediction, the development of Early Warning Systems (EWS), drought response and risk management planning, regional cooperation on drought response, and information transfer and communication networks. Leading experts will share knowledge on drought prediction techniques, including the selection of drought monitoring indices and determining the magnitude, spatial extent, trends, duration, and potential impacts of drought. Stakeholders and end-users will learn about the types of climate information that are available to support their decision-making and discuss with climate scientists the types and formats of information that would be most useful for them, to guide future research and development.  

The capacities of APEC economies to predict drought and future climate events vary greatly across the region. As part of the project activities, a structured training exercise will be conducted to educate participants from developing economies on computing and using various drought indices along with spatial modeling techniques to quantify and assess drought vulnerability in their economy. This training exercise will enhance the ability of these participants to create evidence-based strategies to develop drought resilience. The APEC Climate Center (APCC) will draw upon its expertise in conducting regional capacity building workshops to lead this training exercise.


[1] World Meteorological Organization. “Press Release No. 954.” Last modified 21 August 2012. Accessed 1 March 2013. http://www.wmo.int/pages/mediacentre/press_releases/PR_954_en.html.

Objectives

The project aims to reduce the vulnerability of APEC economies to the negative impacts of drought by building capacity in drought prediction and monitoring and sharing best practices for drought response planning. The project seeks to do this by fulfilling the following objectives:

1. To enhance the capability of member economies to accurately predict and monitor drought conditions through facilitating the exchange of the latest innovations in climate prediction;

2. To promote collaboration and information-sharing on drought prediction and preparedness between member economies and to bring together a diverse network of stakeholders in the APEC region that are impacted by drought;

3. To strengthen the framework for science-based decision-making by facilitating dialogue between climate researchers and end-users and addressing the challenges in disseminating policy-relevant climate information from scientists to stakeholders.

Achieving these objectives will help accomplish the APEC Climate Center’s mission to enhance the socio-economic well-being of member economies by utilizing up-to-date scientific knowledge, applying innovative climate prediction techniques, and providing reliable climate information and services.

Alignment

Through its efforts to improve scientific understanding of drought prediction and monitoring and to share best practices for drought preparedness and response, this project relates to “Emergency preparedness and disaster management”, one of the Rank 2 Funding criteria for all APEC-funded Projects in 2013. APEC strives to strengthen human security in the region and the APEC Leaders, in their Vladivostok Declaration, acknowledged “the vulnerabilities of our economies to natural and anthropogenic disasters, we reaffirm the importance of enhancing preventative measures, emergency preparedness, disaster resiliency and fostering of scientific and technical cooperation among APEC economies, communities and businesses in this regard.” According to internationally reported drought statistics, more than 2.1 billion people have been impacted by drought since 1990, with over 11 million fatalities; drought affects more people around the world than any other single type of natural disaster[1].

This project aligns with the Policy Partnership on Science, Technology, and Innovation (PPSTI)’s mission of “sharing best practices to promote science capacity […] and to enhance regional S&T connectivity among government, academic and private stake holders”. While the newly established PPSTI has not yet developed a work-plan or medium-term plan, this project addresses the goals and key priorities identified in the medium-term plan of the former incarnation of the PPSTI, the Industrial Science and Technology Working Group. The project aligns with Key Priority 1, namely to “enhance scientific and technological collaboration and cooperation to help address our common challenges.” 

In line with the project activities, the Vladivostok Declaration affirms APEC’s commitment to food security and the Niigata Action Plan on Food Security aims to “enhance regional capacity to mitigate, prepare for, respond to and recover from disasters affecting the agricultural sector, with a focus on the impacts of climate change and climate variability.” Because the agriculture sector is greatly affected by periods of drought, this project directly relates to the issue of food security. Access to information about impending drought allows farmers and agricultural managers to hedge against the risks posed by drought, through investment in drought-tolerant crop varietals or switching to water-efficient management techniques.


[1] EM-DAT: The International Disaster Database. “Result Disaster Profiles – Drought”. Last modified November 2012. Accessed 1 March 2013.http://www.emdat.be/result-disaster-profiles?disgroup=natural&period=1900242013&dis_type=Drought&Submit=Display+Disaster+Profile

TILF/ASF Justification

Developing economies are more vulnerable to extreme climate events, such as drought. However, most developing economies have inadequate technical capacity to produce high-quality drought information for their local areas of interest. 

On the final day of the event, a tutorial session will take place that is targeted to participants from developing economies. The tutorial session will be an introduction to using drought indices in concert with Geographic Information System (GIS) mapping. Through this activity, participants will be able to identify the areas at highest risk for drought in their economy, which will be useful for drought policy and disaster response planning. Drought vulnerability maps will be created by using drought indices, which integrate data on rainfall, streamflow, surface water, soil moisture, and other hydrological and topographical variables to monitor moisture supply and detect the conditions for emerging drought. The maps of drought vulnerability areas created with GIS can be used for drought risk zoning and determining which areas to target for drought relief and adaptation. The topic of this tutorial session was selected after consultation with the APCC Working Group, which is made up of representatives from the National Meteorological and Hydrological Services in 20 of the 21 member economies. GIS is a growing field and many representatives from developing economies expressed interest in learning more about applying GIS technology to meteorology and climatology.

Open Source GIS software, which is free of charge, will be used in order to reduce economic barriers to adopting this technology in developing economies. While more sophisticated software programs and more intensive training are certainly necessary for more robust scientific results, this training session will be a good opportunity to introduce the participants to using GIS technology and spatial analysis for drought management.

The symposium itself will address developing economies’ needs through sharing of latest drought research and best practices for drought management and encouraging dialogue between producers and users of climate information. The project will fund the participation and travel costs of representatives from developing economies to partake in the symposium and capacity building activities.

Beneficiaries and Outputs

The outputs of the project will be the conference proceedings and the tutorial module. The recommendations from the keynote speakers and experts during the final panel discussion will also be recorded and summarized. The beneficiaries will be the project participants, namely climate scientists, government officials, academics, decision-makers, representatives from the private sector, and other stakeholders in the region. APCC will strive to involve a balanced audience of participants and will actively seek out contributors from developing economies and women.

This project will benefit the producers and users of drought information in both developing and developed economies and will further global discourse on linking drought science and policy. Presentations will be made by the researchers and scientists that predict and monitor drought, as well as the government officials and other stakeholders that must process drought information to prepare for and recover from drought episodes. In this way, the symposium is a unique opportunity for these disparate groups to interact and share their knowledge, experiences, and ideas.

The issue of drought needs to be discussed at the levels of policy making, academic research, and private sector involvement to gain a clear understanding of the end-to-end process of producing and using drought information to mitigate and adapt to extreme climate events. Climate scientists need to understand how policy decisions are made and what the user requirements, such as lead-time, are for drought prediction and monitoring. On the other hand, users of drought information must build scientific literacy to understand how drought information is produced and the uncertainties inherent to forecasts. This project seeks to alter the typical linear flows of information transfer from producers to users by fostering a collaborative dialogue.

All participants will have the opportunity to share and learn best practices and highlight barriers to making drought information actionable in their respective economies, as well as relate regional initiatives that they are involved in. The conference sessions and project outputs in the form of proceedings, presentations, and other knowledge products will benefit all participants. The project outputs will be made available on the APCC website to assist participants with information recall and transfer. Because the sessions will allow producers of climate information to interface with end-users, the PO hope to promote lasting relationships that will continue beyond the confines of the project.

Dissemination

The results of this activity will be disseminated to the participants and other stakeholders through the distribution of the Conference Proceedings and Extended Abstract Book. The Conference Proceedings will include a summary of each presentation, as well as the dialogue from the question and answer sessions following each presentation and during the expert panel discussion. For the Extended Abstract book, each speaker will be asked to create an extended 3-page abstract describing the most salient points of their presentation, including methodology and figures. One hundred copies of the Extended Abstract Book will be published in hard copy and given to the participants and speakers at the event.  The Conference Proceedings will be published on the APCC website and distributed through the APCC mailing list, an international network that spans hundreds of climate scientists, research institutions, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), academics, and government officials.

The presentation slides and abstracts will also be made available to the public through the APCC website in order to extend the benefits of the event to those who were unable to attend. All publications will be prepared in compliance with APEC publication guides and copyrights and copies of the Abstract Book and Proceedings will be submitted to the Secretariat to be made available on the online APEC Publications Database.

Gender

Gender discrepancy is a notable issue in the atmospheric sciences. A 2001 report by the World Meteorological Organization estimated that a mere 23% of professionals working in National Hydrological and Meteorological Services are female.[1] The amount of women in senior positions in such organizations is even lower. Given the gender discrepancy among the pool of targeted participants, the PO will strive to involve women in the event and ensure that the ratio of female participants falls at the very least within the average range. At the APEC Climate Symposium 2012, 35% of the participants were female.  Furthermore, four of the seven members of the Organizing Committee for this project are women and will assure that the program design and agenda are gender equitable.

The project is expected to engage and develop the skills of both women and men equally. Participants from both genders will be given the opportunity to share their experiences during the conference sessions. The session facilitators will take care to solicit audience feedback from both female and male participants so that an even range of perspectives is shared.


[1] Henson, Bob. University Corporation of Atmospheric Research, “Women in Meteorology: How Long a Minority?” Last modified 2003. Acessed 1 March 2013.
http://www.ucar.edu/communications/quarterly/fall03/wmo.html.

Work Plan

In order to achieve the project by November 11-13, preparations began in advance of receiving the final notice of approval of APEC project funding. This has been made possible by the large contribution of self-funding from the APEC Climate Center and the Indonesian Agency for Meteorology, Climatology, and Geophysics.

A. Initial planning (May 2013)

The Project Organizer (PO) and the local host, the Indonesian Agency for Meteorology, Climatology, and Geophysics, will discuss shared tasks and the division of self-funding. Duties will include coordinating with participants, venue preparations, the assembly of abstract book, design of program materials, providing for refreshments and meals, etc.  The proponent will also discuss with the local hosts about arrangements for the venue, accommodation, and local transportation. The local host will estimate costs and make the necessary reservations.

The PO will convene an Organizing Committee composed of experts and leaders in the fields of drought prediction, monitoring, and response. The Committee will act as an advisory body on the content and design of the sessions and tutorial. The proponent will also liaise with the Chairs and/or Lead Shepherd of the Emergency Preparedness and Agricultural Technical Cooperation Working Groups to scope out opportunities for cross-fora collaboration.

Outputs: division of responsibilities, Organizing Committee

B. Program development (May-June 2013)

The 1st Announcement publicizing the symposium objectives, basic agenda, and call for abstracts will be released and widely disseminated.  Participants from developing economies and women will be particularly targeted. Keynote and expert speakers will be identified and sent invitations. Invitations will also be sent to specific government agencies and NGOs to ensure their representation.

Outputs: program design, invitations, 1st Announcement

C. Communication with participants (July-August 2013)

The PO will set up a website for participant registration and submission of abstracts. Participant registration and upload of abstracts will commence. Official letters of invitation from the local host will be issued in order to secure an Indonesian visa, for those participants that require it. The Monitoring Report detailing the progress of activities will be prepared and submitted to APEC by August 1.

Outputs: website, abstracts, visa invitation letters

D. Logistical arrangements and monitoring of progress (September-October 2013)

Registration of participants will be monitored and an expanded agenda of the conference sessions will be prepared. All information regarding accommodation, transportation, the welcoming reception, the program, etc. will be communicated to participants in a Second Announcement. PO justifications for non-APEC participants will be sent for APEC Secretariat approval, if needed. The appropriate Travel Undertaking paperwork will be sent to APEC-funded participants for their signature. The PO will work closely with the PPSTI Program Executive on airfare approvals. T

Outputs: Second Announcement, Monitoring Report, PO justifications (if needed), Travel Undertakings, final participants list

E. Conduct the event (November 11-13, 2013)

A press release will be issued by the organizers and local host. Final preparations for the venue, sessions, program, etc. will be made. The event will occur over three days, from August 26-28, 2013 in Jakarta, Indonesia.

A basic outline of the agenda for the symposium is shown below:

November 11

November 12

November 13

Morning Session

Opening Ceremony and Keynote Speeches

Drought Monitoring and Communication

Wrapping-up Session and Panel Discussion

Afternoon Session

Drought Prediction and Science at Multiple Time-Scales

Regional Cooperation on Drought Preparedness and Response

Tutorial Session

Outputs: press release, symposium, tutorial session

F. Follow-up activities (November-December 2013)

The proponent will send reimbursement instructions and thank you notes to participants. PO certifications for the contractor and participants will be sent to the APEC Secretariat. Conference proceedings, abstracts, presentation files, and other materials will be compiled, revised, and uploaded to the project website.

Outputs: PO certifications, thank you letters, reimbursements, conference proceedings

G. Evaluation (December 2013)

An internal evaluation will be conducted by APCC staff and the local host based on the APEC survey forms completed by participants and self-assessment. The Completion Report will be prepared and sent to APEC Secretariat.

Outputs: survey analysis, Completion Report

Risks

The expertise of the speakers and the openness of the participants will greatly impact the project’s outcomes and could pose a potential risk. For the project’s success, the PO assumes that the invited speakers are knowledgeable and cogent communicators, that the session facilitators are effective in structuring discussions and eliciting participation, and that the participants are eager to learn, receptive to new ideas and willing to apply and share new concepts in their workplace.

We aim to select participants that mid-level professionals in their respective fields. We will ask that the National Meteorological and Hydrological Services, research institutes, other government agencies, NGOs, and private sector representatives nominate the most qualified participant from their organization, which ensures that the participants are well-respected and influential in their home country.

The PO will communicate with the participants prior to the symposium to inform them of the objectives of the event, generate interest, and solicit feedback. It is likely that the project organizers will encounter difficulties in engaging women due to the relatively low numbers of women in the field of meteorology. The proponent will actively seek out female speakers and participants for each session and encourage their active involvement in all stages of the project. Our goal is a mix of male and female participants from both developing and developed countries, to ensure fairness and make certain that all voices are heard.

To ensure optimal program development and speaker selection, the proponent will convene an Organizing Committee composed of experts in drought prediction, monitoring, and response who will provide advice on the program and recommend of expert speakers. The theme and programming of this event were selected after evaluating participant feedback from last year’s APEC Climate Symposium 2012, so APCC is confident that the issues that will be discussed are relevant to the scientific and disaster management priorities of APEC economies.

Monitoring and Evaluation

A. Monitoring

The progress of the project will be monitored throughout the planning period (June – October), to ensure that the project is on track, within budget, on time, and successfully meeting its objectives. The proponent will also assess whether the potential risks associated with the project, particularly those associated with the selection of and communication with speakers and participants, have been sufficiently addressed in the preparation stages.

The work plan detailed above will be an essential tool for the project team to monitor and assess its progress. A similar work plan will be prepared for the 3rd party contractor that the PO plans to hire to help organize the local logistics in Indonesia. A self-funded monitoring visit by the PO to Jakarta to view the conditions of the venue, accommodation, and other preparations will also occur.

B. Evaluation

Following the project, the proponent will conduct a survey of the participants, using the Questionnaire for APEC Projects which are in the Category of Seminar, Symposium or Short-term Training Course as a template, along with additional questions that have been specifically tailored to the project. The survey will assess the effectiveness of the project in terms of participant satisfaction and transfer of knowledge and will solicit recommendations for improvement for future projects. Survey results will be disaggregated in terms of gender and member economy for more detailed analysis.

Once the participant responses have been tabulated and analyzed, the PO will also consult with the members of the Organizing Committee, keynote speakers, and session facilitators to conduct an evaluation on the design of the sessions, quality of the presentations, active involvement of male and female participants, and overall management of the project. The number of participants, the survey feedback, the balance between women and men, and between the APEC member economies will be used as performance indicators.

The proponent will also solicit feedback from the APEC Secretariat on how the project could have been better managed, particularly in terms of following the guidelines prescribed in the APEC Guidebook for Projects.

Linkages

Engagement: To increase linkages among APEC fora and to avoid overlap, the proponent plans to engage the Emergency Preparedness Working Group and Policy Partnership on Food Security in this project. A presentation was made at the 8th Emergency Preparedness Working Group Meeting, held in Medan, Indonesia, on July 2 to introduce the EPWG to the project and its objectives. EPWG members have promised to pass along the information about the project to the relevant institutions related to drought in their economies. The PPFS will also be invited to participate in the event, because strengthened food supply chains will be integral to overcoming the negative impacts of agricultural drought.

Representatives from NGOs and international bodies, such as the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), and the UN Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD) will also be invited to share their expertise on using climate information for drought preparedness and risk management planning. The private sector will also be engaged by inviting representatives from industries affected by drought, e.g. agribusiness, and providers of disaster insurance.

Previous work: The APEC Climate Center was established in 2005, with the agreement and support of all member economies, at the APEC Leader’s Summit in Busan, Korea. Since then, APCC has provided seasonal climate forecasts and other climate information products and services, conducted research and development activities, promoted the application of climate information for socioeconomic benefit, and organized capacity building initiatives in the region. APCC is situated in a unique position that allows it to interface with both climate scientists and policy makers based on its mandate and position in the APEC framework.

In 2012, APCC was granted funding for the project Harnessing and Using Climate Information for Decision Making (ASF-funded, IST 02-2012A), an international conference that explored the use of climate information in the agriculture sector. This event covered climate prediction at multiple time scales (climate variability and climate change) and the application of climate information at various stages in the agricultural value chain. Based on participant feedback, the proposed project will build upon the last conference to more deeply examine the benefit of climate prediction specifically for drought preparedness and disaster management. The APEC Leaders recognized the need for an institutionalized mechanism for sharing climate information in 2005, when they hailed the establishment of the APEC Climate Center. APCC has progressively delivered positive results on its APEC projects, continuously innovating, improving, and adding value in a sustainable fashion.

APEC’s comparative advantage: Because the issue of drought transcends national borders, global institutions like APEC are the best forum for addressing cooperative efforts to prepare for, respond to, and recover from drought and related natural disasters. Drought is a cross-cutting issue which impacts economic activities, food security, and livelihoods in both developed and developing countries – precisely the areas in which APEC furthers economic and technical cooperation.

While other regions have cooperative bodies for drought, such as the Pan-European Drought Dialogue Forum, no equivalent exists for the Asia-Pacific region and APEC is best suited to address this issue. . APEC’s expertise in regional economic integration and trade is necessary for addressing the issue of drought preparedness and response because strengthened food supply chains will be integral to overcoming the food shortages (crops and livestock) that result from agricultural drought. Moreover, increased regional trade in other goods will be necessary to compensate for the negative production impacts on industries affected by drought. Furthermore, APEC has a unique and distinct responsibility to conduct this activity because of the unique range of meteorological and climatological conditions within the APEC member economies. Member economies that have extensive experience dealing with drought, such as the United States, Australia, and China, have much to share with those economies that are projected to experience increasingly severe drought conditions under climate change, such as Southeast Asia

Existing global initiatives include the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) Drought Interest Group (DIG), a scientific group working on drought monitoring and prediction and the recent WMO/UN High-level Meeting on National Drought Policy. While these initiatives explore drought from either a purely scientific or policy oriented perspective, the proposed project improves upon their efforts by bringing together representatives from academia, governments, and the private sector to discuss the important issues of drought and disaster management. Representatives of the aforementioned global forums will be invited to the proposed event in order to share the perspectives of their initiatives.

Sustainability

This project has been designed to share perspectives from a variety of actors: scientists working on drought and climate, representatives from NHMSs who conduct operational forecasting, government officials, and representatives from the private sector. The project offers a unique opportunity for decision-makers to interface with climate scientists and communicate their drought prediction and monitoring needs. The goal is to facilitate interaction and build what will hopefully become enduring relationships among participants. A detailed contact list of the experts and participants that partook in the symposium will be provided to all contributors, to facilitate networking and collaboration after the event. The participants are expected to share their learning and experiences with colleagues after they return to their member economies. 

APCC will take the initiative to reach out to the participants 6 months after the event to monitor whether the participants have been able to use the lessons from the presentations and the tutorial session in their work, to inquire whether further technical support is needed, and solicit recommendations on follow-up activities. The participants will be asked to complete a survey that describes how the event has affected their work and what steps they have taken to share what they’ve learned with their colleagues and other stakeholders in their home economy.

The PO recognizes that the time allocated for the tutorial session is somewhat brief and participants are likely to have follow-up questions after the event. The APEC Climate Center is committed to supporting the participants following the event and participants will be given the contact information of the APCC instructors so that they are able to consult with them regarding the technical aspects of the tutorial session material. Depending on participant interest, the PO will consider hosting an on-line discussion or group chat session so that participants can discuss applications and challenges of the tutorial material.

This project is not a one-off initiative but part of a broader APEC Climate Center mission to foster linkages between forecast providers and their end-users. APCC will also conduct its own outreach initiatives to communicate with participants through surveys and networking to solicit feedback that will be integrated into developing its products and services. Through the APCC Working Group, which is made up of representatives from National Meteorological and Hydrological Services from 20 out of 21 APEC member economies, APCC will communicate the outcomes of the event to the APEC community. This project will build upon APCC’s proven track record of successful international cooperation and exchange of climate information and services.

Project Overseers

The Project Overseer will be Mr. Hyoung Keun Yang, the Head of the External Affairs Department at the APEC Climate Center. Mr. Yang has experience in international affairs from a diplomatic standpoint, as well as in the private sector. Prior to joining APCC, he was the Manager of the Corporate Affairs Group at Tesco Korea, where he was responsible for managing community relations and corporate social responsibility. In the past he has also held positions with the Permanent Mission of the Republic of Korea to the United Nations, Development Finance International, Incorporated, and the Federation of Korean Music Performers. Mr. Yang received his M.S. in Foreign Service and International Development from Georgetown University, USA in 2008.

The main scientific contact person will be Dr. Jinyoung Rhee, a member of the Scientific Organizing Committee for the project and a Research Fellow at APCC. Dr. Rhee earned her Ph.D. in Geography from the University of South Carolina, USA in 2007, where she developed a regional drought monitoring system for the Carolinas. Her previous work experience includes the Carolinas Integrated Sciences & Assessments at the University of South Carolina, where she worked as a Research Associate specializing in climatology, geographic information science, and drought monitoring. She has been involved in multiple NOAA-sponsored projects to improve the use of climate information for water-related decision making. Prior to coming to APCC, she conducted research for climate change adaptation, vulnerability, and risk management at the Korea Adaptation Center for Climate Change at the Korea Environment Institute. Her research interests include the use of geographic information systems and remote sensing for hydroclimatology, climate impacts on water resources, and climate change adaptation and risk management. At APCC, she pursues research that integrates GIS science and hydroclimatology, beginning with the development of remote sensing-based drought measures for water resources managers.

Cost Efficiency

The project offers a high return on investment for APEC. Eighty percent of the APEC funding requested will go directly to funding the travel and per diem of speakers and participants. The reason for hosting an event with such a large number of participants is to actively seek out perspectives from a range of actors across the region. The majority of the project will be financed by the APEC Climate Center and the Indonesian Agency for Meteorology, Climatology, and Geophysics, with a 35 percent contribution requested from the APEC Secretariat. Several experts from the APEC Climate Center’s international network of scientists have already agreed to cover the cost of their own airline tickets.

The selection of the venue for the symposium follows the host of the APEC meetings for that year. This is to ensure that the APEC Climate Center activities are conducted in a fair rotation of all economies and enables us to closely engage all economies in the region on pertinent issues. The local host, the Indonesian Agency for Meteorology, Climatology, and Geophysics (BMKG), will assist the PO in identifying the most cost-effective facilities and negotiating hotel rates to bring down project costs. Representatives from government agencies and universities within the Jakarta metropolitan area will be invited to take part in the event; their proximity to the project venue means they will be able to benefit from the symposium and tutorial session with no costs in terms of travel or per diem.

While the value of this project is difficult to quantify in dollar terms, the potential outcomes are clearly significant, as the project will build the capacities of member economies to better prepare for and respond to the negative economic impacts of drought.

Drawdown Timetable

Not Applicable

Direct Labour

The PO would like to contract the services of a third party to provide services to support the organizing of the symposium, tutorial session and related events. The tasks include, but are not limited to, the following:

- Identifying suitable venues and negotiating a cost-efficient venue and accommodation package

- Managing and coordinating all venue and accommodation matters

- Developing a promotional strategy to encourage local participation

- Contacting local media outlets and releasing press releases in the local language (Bahasa Indonesia) before and after the event

- Arranging the design, production and distribution of promotional materials, stationery, IDs, banners, name plates, etc.

-  Facilitating the visa invitation and application process

-  Collating abstracts and presentations of all speakers and active participants for distribution

-  Managing transportation of participants from the airport to the hotel and from accommodations to the symposium venue

-  Managing the registration and information desks, Internet corner, presentation system, and sound system, and providing technical support to presenters and participants during the tutorial session

-  Working closely with the PO in managing all administrative, logistical and technical issues

-  Helping manage the receptions, meals and coffee breaks provided to participants

-  Distributing and collecting completed evaluation and survey forms

The PO estimates that the above tasks will require 400 man hours.

Waivers

The proponent may request funding for non-APEC experts or speakers later on. However, the experts to be invited have not yet been determined at this stage and the PO will update the PPSTI Program Director and Program Executive as needed.

Are there any supporting document attached?

No 
Attachments
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Created at 26/08/2013 10:52  by Lucy Phua 
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Version HistoryVersion History

Project No.

Project Title

Project Status

Publication (if any)

Fund Account

Sub-fund

Project Year

Project Session

APEC Funding

Co-funding Amount

Total Project Value

Sponsoring Forum

Topics

Committee

Other Fora Involved

Other Non-APEC Stakeholders Involved

Proposing Economy(ies)

Co-Sponsoring Economies

Expected Start Date

Expected Completion Date

Project Proponent Name 1

Job Title 1

Organization 1

Postal Address 1

Telephone 1

Fax 1

Email 1

Project Proponent Name 2

Job Title 2

Organization 2

Postal Address 2

Telephone 2

Fax 2

Email 2

Declaration

Project Summary

Relevance

Objectives

Alignment

TILF/ASF Justification

Beneficiaries and Outputs

Dissemination

Gender

Work Plan

Risks

Monitoring and Evaluation

Linkages

Sustainability

Project Overseers

Cost Efficiency

Drawdown Timetable

Direct Labour

Waivers

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Consolidated QAF

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Monitoring Report Received

Completion Report Received

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